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    Ames Laboratory Awarded $5 Million to Improve Metal Powders for Advanced Manufacturing

    Ames Laboratory Awarded $5 Million to Improve Metal Powders for Advanced Manufacturing

    Ames Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been awarded $5 million from the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) to improve the production and composition of metal alloy powders used in additive manufacturing.

    Exploring the Fate of the Earth's Storehouse of Carbon

    Exploring the Fate of the Earth's Storehouse of Carbon

    A new study predicts that warming temperatures will contribute to the release into the atmosphere of carbon that has long been locked up securely in the coldest reaches of our planet.Soil and climate expert Katherine Todd-Brown of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is an author of the study, which was led by researchers at Yale.

    Where the Rains Come From

    Where the Rains Come From

    Intense storms have become more frequent and longer-lasting in the Great Plains and Midwest in the last 35 years. What has fueled these storms? The temperature difference between the Southern Great Plains and the Atlantic Ocean produces winds that carry moisture from the Gulf of Mexico to the Great Plains, according to a new study in Nature Communications.

    Glowing Crystals Can Detect, Cleanse Contaminated Drinking Water

    Glowing Crystals Can Detect, Cleanse Contaminated Drinking Water

    Motivated by public hazards associated with contaminated sources of drinking water, a team of scientists has successfully developed and tested tiny, glowing crystals that can detect and trap heavy-metal toxins like mercury and lead.

    Ultrafast Imaging Reveals Existence of 'Polarons'

    Ultrafast Imaging Reveals Existence of 'Polarons'

    UPTON, NY--Many people picture electrical conductivity as the flow of charged particles (mainly electrons) without really thinking about the atomic structure of the material through which those charges are moving. But scientists who study "strongly correlated electron" materials such as high-temperature superconductors and those with strong responses to magnetism know that picture is far too simplistic.

    Komodo Dragons Help Researchers Understand Microbial Health in Captive Animals

    Komodo Dragons Help Researchers Understand Microbial Health in Captive Animals

    Researchers at the University of California San Diego, the University of Colorado-Boulder, the University of Chicago and Argonne are the first to identify similarities in the way in which Komodo dragons and humans and their pets share microbes within closed environments.

    Genes, Early Environment Sculpt the Gut Microbiome

    Genes, Early Environment Sculpt the Gut Microbiome

    A new study finds that environment and genetics determine relative abundance of specific microbes in the gut. The findings represent an attempt to untangle the forces that shape the gut microbiome, which plays an important role in keeping us healthy.

    Ames Laboratory Scientists Create New Compound, First Intermetallic Double Salt with Platinum

    Ames Laboratory Scientists Create New Compound, First Intermetallic Double Salt with Platinum

    Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are being credited with creating the first intermetallic double salt with platinum.

    Scientists Trace 'Poisoning' in Chemical Reactions to the Atomic Scale

    Scientists Trace 'Poisoning' in Chemical Reactions to the Atomic Scale

    A combination of experiments, including X-ray studies at Berkeley Lab, revealed new details about pesky deposits that can stop chemical reactions vital to fuel production and other processes.

    Global Brain Initiatives Generate Tsunami of Neuroscience Data

    Global Brain Initiatives Generate Tsunami of Neuroscience Data

    New technologies are giving researchers unprecedented opportunities to explore how the brain processes, utilizes, stores and retrieves information. But without a coherent strategy to analyze, manage and understand the data generated by these new tools, advancements in the field will be limited. Berkeley Lab researchers and their collaborators offer a plan to overcome these big data challenges.

    X-Rays Capture Unprecedented Images of Photosynthesis in Action

    X-Rays Capture Unprecedented Images of Photosynthesis in Action

    An international team of scientists is providing new insight into the process by which plants use light to split water and create oxygen. In experiments led by Berkeley Lab scientists, ultrafast X-ray lasers were able to capture atomic-scale images of a protein complex found in plants, algae, and cyanobacteria at room temperature.

    New, Detailed Snapshots Capture Photosynthesis at Room Temperature

    New, Detailed Snapshots Capture Photosynthesis at Room Temperature

    New X-ray methods at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have captured the highest resolution room-temperature images of protein complex photosystem II, which allows scientists to closely watch how water is split during photosynthesis at the temperature at which it occurs naturally.

    New Tabletop Technique Probes Outermost Electrons of Atoms Deep Inside Solids

    New Tabletop Technique Probes Outermost Electrons of Atoms Deep Inside Solids

    Researchers at the Stanford PULSE Institute have invented a new way to probe the valence electrons of atoms deep inside a crystalline solid.

    Argonne Researchers Study How Reflectivity of Biofuel Crops Impacts Climate

    Argonne Researchers Study How Reflectivity of Biofuel Crops Impacts Climate

    Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory have conducted a detailed study of the albedo (reflectivity) effects of converting land to grow biofuel crops. Based on changes in albedo alone, their findings reveal that greenhouse gas emissions in land use change scenarios represent a net warming effect for ethanol made from miscanthus grass and switchgrass, but a net cooling effect for ethanol made from corn.

    Engineering a More Efficient System for Harnessing Carbon Dioxide

    Engineering a More Efficient System for Harnessing Carbon Dioxide

    A team from the Max-Planck-Institute (MPI) for Terrestrial Microbiology in Marburg, Germany has reverse engineered a biosynthetic pathway for more effective carbon fixation that is based on a new CO2-fixing enzyme that is nearly 20 times faster than the most prevalent enzyme in nature responsible for capturing CO2 in plants by using sunlight as energy.

    Supercomputer Simulations Help Develop New Approach to Fight Antibiotic Resistance

    Supercomputer Simulations Help Develop New Approach to Fight Antibiotic Resistance

    Supercomputer simulations at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have played a key role in discovering a new class of drug candidates that hold promise to combat antibiotic resistance. In a study led by the University of Oklahoma with ORNL, the University of Tennessee and Saint Louis University, lab experiments were combined with supercomputer modeling to identify molecules that boost antibiotics' effect on disease-causing bacteria.

    A New Way to Image Solar Cells in 3-D

    A New Way to Image Solar Cells in 3-D

    Berkeley Lab scientists have developed a way to use optical microscopy to map thin-film solar cells in 3-D as they absorb photons.

    X-Ray Laser Gets First Real-Time Snapshots of a Chemical Flipping a Biological Switch

    X-Ray Laser Gets First Real-Time Snapshots of a Chemical Flipping a Biological Switch

    Scientists have used the powerful X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to make the first snapshots of a chemical interaction between two biomolecules - one that flips an RNA "switch" that regulates production of proteins, the workhorse molecules of life.

    Simulations Show Swirling Rings, Whirlpool-Like Structure in Subatomic 'Soup'

    Simulations Show Swirling Rings, Whirlpool-Like Structure in Subatomic 'Soup'

    Powerful supercomputer simulations of high-energy collisions between atomic cores provide new insights about the complex structure of a superhot fluid called the quark-gluon plasma.

    Solar Cells Get Boost with Integration of Water-Splitting Catalyst Onto Semiconductor

    Solar Cells Get Boost with Integration of Water-Splitting Catalyst Onto Semiconductor

    Berkeley Lab scientists have found a way to engineer the atomic-scale chemical properties of a water-splitting catalyst for integration with a solar cell, and the result is a big boost to the stability and efficiency of artificial photosynthesis. The research comes out of the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP), established to develop a cost-effective method of turning sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide into fuel.

    Scientists, Interns Bring Structural Biology's 'Magic Bullet' Technique to X-Ray Lasers

    Scientists, Interns Bring Structural Biology's 'Magic Bullet' Technique to X-Ray Lasers

    To understand the three-dimensional shape of a protein, scientists often rely on information from similar molecules. But sometimes, the protein is so unique that it's not possible to find a close relative.

    Accelerating Cancer Research with Deep Learning

    Accelerating Cancer Research with Deep Learning

    Using the Titan supercomputer at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility, a DOE Office of Science User Facility located at ORNL, Tourassi's team applied deep learning to extract useful information from cancer pathology reports, a foundational element of cancer surveillance. Working with modest datasets, the team obtained preliminary findings that demonstrate deep learning's potential for cancer surveillance.

    PPPL Physicists Build Diagnostic That Measures Plasma Velocity in Real Time

    PPPL Physicists Build Diagnostic That Measures Plasma Velocity in Real Time

    Physicists at PPPL have developed a diagnostic that provides crucial real-time information about the ultrahot plasma swirling within doughnut-shaped fusion machines known as tokamaks.

    Study: Carbon-Hungry Plants Impede Growth Rate of Atmospheric CO2 

    Study: Carbon-Hungry Plants Impede Growth Rate of Atmospheric CO2 

    New findings suggest the rate at which CO2 is accumulating in the atmosphere has plateaued in recent years because Earth's vegetation is grabbing more carbon from the air than in previous decades.