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    Existing State Laws Collectively Require a 50% Increase in U.S. Renewable Electricity

    Existing State Laws Collectively Require a 50% Increase in U.S. Renewable Electricity

    State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have contributed to more than half of all renewable electricity growth in the United States since 2000. Most state RPS requirements will continue to rise through at least 2020, if not beyond, and collectively these policies will require substantial further growth in U.S. renewable electricity supplies, according to a new report from Berkeley Lab.

    Story Tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, April 2016

    Story Tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, April 2016

    ORNL researchers focus on minimizing impact of natural and man-made disasters hit; Aberrated probes helping to detect magnetic properties in materials; Thermoelectric heat pump dryer potentially uses 40 percent less energy; ORNL researchers discover structures designed to monitor fish movement are potential obstacles

    World's Fastest Electron Diffraction Snapshots of Atomic Motions in Gases

    World's Fastest Electron Diffraction Snapshots of Atomic Motions in Gases

    Scientists have made a significant advance toward making movies of extremely fast atomic processes with potential applications in energy production, chemistry, medicine, materials science and more. Using a superfast, high-resolution "electron camera," a new instrument for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, researchers have captured the world's fastest UED images of nitrogen molecules rotating in a gas, with a record shutter speed of 100 quadrillionths of a second.

    Scientists Study the Insulator-Superconductor Transition of Copper-Oxide Compound in Fine Detail

    Scientists Study the Insulator-Superconductor Transition of Copper-Oxide Compound in Fine Detail

    Using a highly controlled deposition technique, scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have synthesized ultrathin films containing multiple samples of a copper-oxide compound to study the compound's electronic behavior at near-absolute-zero temperature.

    Berkeley Lab Working on Key Components for LCLS-II X-ray Lasers

    Berkeley Lab Working on Key Components for LCLS-II X-ray Lasers

    As part of a unique new X-ray laser project that will produce up to 1 million ultrabright X-ray pulses per second, Berkeley Lab researchers are managing the development of a new breed of electron "gun" and chains of powerful magnetic devices that cause electrons to emit ultrabright X-rays.

    Scientists Push Valleytronics One Step Closer to Reality

    Scientists Push Valleytronics One Step Closer to Reality

    Berkeley Lab scientists have taken a big step toward the practical application of "valleytronics," which is a new type of electronics that could lead to faster and more efficient computer logic systems and data storage chips in next-generation devices. They experimentally demonstrated, for the first time, the ability to electrically generate and control valley electrons in a two-dimensional semiconductor.

    Low-Cost and Lightweight

    Low-Cost and Lightweight

    For the first time, researchers have been able to see what makes this titanium alloy so strong - and then make it stronger.

    X-Rays Reveal How a Solar Cell Gets Its Silver Stripes

    X-Rays Reveal How a Solar Cell Gets Its Silver Stripes

    The silver electrical contacts that carry electricity out of about 90 percent of the solar modules on the market are also one of their most expensive parts. Now scientists from two Department of Energy national laboratories have used X-rays to observe exactly how those contacts form during manufacturing.

    ORNL Surges Forward with 20-Kilowatt Wireless Charging for Vehicles

    ORNL Surges Forward with 20-Kilowatt Wireless Charging for Vehicles

    A 20-kilowatt wireless charging system demonstrated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has achieved 90 percent efficiency and at three times the rate of the plug-in systems commonly used for electric vehicles today.

    Proving the Genetic Code's Flexibility

    Proving the Genetic Code's Flexibility

    In Angewandte Chemie International Ed., DOE Joint Genome Institute and Yale University researchers report that microorganisms recognize multiple codons for selenocysteine. The finding builds on studies indicating that an organism's genetic vocabulary is not as constrained as had been long held.

    Argonne Continues to Pave Way for Improved Battery Performance Testing

    Argonne Continues to Pave Way for Improved Battery Performance Testing

    Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have demonstrated that the placement and type of a tiny measurement device called a reference electrode enhances the quantity and quality of information that can be extracted from lithium-ion battery cells during cycling.

    Revealing the Fluctuations of Flexible DNA in 3-D

    Revealing the Fluctuations of Flexible DNA in 3-D

    Scientists have captured the first high-resolution 3-D images from individual double-helix DNA segments attached to gold nanoparticles, which could aid in the use of DNA segments for nanoscale drug-delivery systems, markers for biological research, and components for electronic devices.

    Nature-Inspired Nanotubes That Assemble Themselves, with Precision

    Nature-Inspired Nanotubes That Assemble Themselves, with Precision

    Berkeley Lab scientists have discovered a family of nature-inspired polymers that, when placed in water, spontaneously assemble into hollow crystalline nanotubes. What's more, the nanotubes can be tuned to all have the same diameter of between five and ten nanometers, depending on the length of the polymer chain.

    A View of the Colorful Microcosm Within a Proton

    A View of the Colorful Microcosm Within a Proton

    UPTON, NY--The proton sounds like a simple object, but it's not. Inside, there's a teeming microcosm of quarks and gluons with properties such as spin and "color" charge that contribute to the particle's seemingly simplistic role as a building block of visible matter. By analyzing the particle debris emitted from collisions of polarized protons at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), scientists say they've found a new way to glimpse that internal microcosm.

    New Catalyst is Three Times Better at Splitting Water

    New Catalyst is Three Times Better at Splitting Water

    With a combination of theory and clever, meticulous gel-making, scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the University of Toronto have developed a new type of catalyst that's three times better than the previous record-holder at splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen - the vital first step in making fuels from renewable solar and wind power.

    Scientists Part the Clouds on How Droplets Form

    Scientists Part the Clouds on How Droplets Form

    A new Berkeley Lab study reveals that much more is happening at the microscopic level of cloud formation than previously thought. The findings could help improve the accuracy of climate change models.

    Moving Microswimmers with Tiny Swirling Flows

    Moving Microswimmers with Tiny Swirling Flows

    Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a way to use a microscopic, swirling flow to rapidly clear a circle of tiny bacteria or swimming robots.

    Unlocking the Secrets of Gene Expression

    Unlocking the Secrets of Gene Expression

    Using cryo-electron microscopy, Berkeley Lab scientist Eva Nogales and her team have made a breakthrough in our understanding of how our molecular machinery finds the right DNA to copy for making proteins, showing with unprecedented detail the role of a powerhouse transcription factor known as TFIID. The study was published this week in Nature.

    ORNL Researchers Invent Tougher Plastic with 50 Percent Renewable Content

    ORNL Researchers Invent Tougher Plastic with 50 Percent Renewable Content

    Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory made a better thermoplastic by replacing styrene with lignin, a brittle, rigid polymer that, with cellulose, forms the woody cell walls of plants.

    Physicist Tyler Abrams Models Lithium Erosion in Tokamaks

    Physicist Tyler Abrams Models Lithium Erosion in Tokamaks

    Physicist Tyler Abrams has led experiments on a facility in the Netherlands called Magnum-PSI showing that combining lithium with the hydrogen isotope deuterium substantially reduced lithium erosion.

    ORNL-NIST Team Explores Nanoscale Objects and Processes with Microwave Microscopy

    ORNL-NIST Team Explores Nanoscale Objects and Processes with Microwave Microscopy

    Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the National Institute of Standards and Technology demonstrated a nondestructive way to observe nanoscale objects and processes in conditions simulating their normal operating environments.

    Bump in LHC Data Has Physicists Electrified

    Bump in LHC Data Has Physicists Electrified

    In December, the ATLAS and CMS experiments reported what could be the first hint of a new massive particle that spits out two photons as it decays. Now, physicists are presenting their latest analyses at the Moriond conference in La Thuile, Italy, including a full investigation of this mysterious bump. After carefully checking, cross-checking and rechecking the data, both experiments have come to the same conclusion--the bump is still there.

    New Carbon Capture Membrane Boasts CO2 Highways

    New Carbon Capture Membrane Boasts CO2 Highways

    A new, highly permeable carbon capture membrane developed at Berkeley Lab could lead to more efficient ways of separating carbon dioxide from power plant exhaust, preventing the greenhouse gas from entering the atmosphere and contributing to climate change.

    Replacement for Silicon Devices Looms Big with ORNL Discovery

    Replacement for Silicon Devices Looms Big with ORNL Discovery

    Two-dimensional electronic devices could inch closer to their ultimate promise of low power, high efficiency and mechanical flexibility with a processing technique developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

    'Disruptive Device' Brings Xenon-NMR to Fragile Materials

    'Disruptive Device' Brings Xenon-NMR to Fragile Materials

    Scientists have developed a device that enables NMR spectroscopy, coupled with a powerful molecular sensor, to analyze molecular interactions in viscous solutions and fragile materials such as liquid crystals. In a first, their method allows the sensor, hyperpolarized xenon gas, to be dissolved into minute samples of substances without disrupting their molecular order.