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    Expanding the Stable of Workhorse Yeasts

    Expanding the Stable of Workhorse Yeasts

    So far industry has only harnessed a fraction of the yeast diversity available for biotechnological applications, including biofuel production. In the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team led by DOE Joint Genome Institute researchers aims to help boost the use of a wider range of yeasts.

    New Material Discovery Allows Study of Elusive Weyl Fermion

    New Material Discovery Allows Study of Elusive Weyl Fermion

    Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have discovered a new type of Weyl semimetal, a material that opens the way for further study of Weyl fermions, a type of massless elementary particle hypothesized by high-energy particle theory and potentially useful for creating high-speed electronic circuits and quantum computers.

    New Residential Water Heater Concept Promises High Efficiency, Lower Cost

    New Residential Water Heater Concept Promises High Efficiency, Lower Cost

    Scientists from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Florida has developed a novel method that could yield lower-cost, higher-efficiency systems for water heating in residential buildings.

    SLAC, Stanford Gadget Grabs More Solar Energy to Disinfect Water Faster

    SLAC, Stanford Gadget Grabs More Solar Energy to Disinfect Water Faster

    Researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have created a nanostructured device, about half the size of a postage stamp, that disinfects water much faster than the UV method by also making use of the visible part of the solar spectrum, which contains 50 percent of the sun's energy.

    Fermi Researchers Explore New Ways of Searching for Dark Matter

    Fermi Researchers Explore New Ways of Searching for Dark Matter

    Researchers working with more than six years of data from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have used novel approaches to search for cosmic signals that could reveal what mysterious dark matter is made of. The scientists looked for hypothetical axion particles, studied the gamma-ray emissions from a large satellite galaxy of our Milky Way and analyzed the faint glow of gamma rays that covers the entire sky.

    3-D Galaxy-mapping Project Enters Construction Phase

    3-D Galaxy-mapping Project Enters Construction Phase

    A 3-D sky-mapping project that will measure the light of millions of galaxies and explore the nature of dark energy has received approval to move forward with construction.

    New Results on the Higgs Boson and the Building Blocks of Matter Presented at ICHEP

    New Results on the Higgs Boson and the Building Blocks of Matter Presented at ICHEP

    Large Hadron Collider (LHC) performance surpasses expectations; results confirm the Higgs particle, show "bump" appears to be a statistical fluctuation, and offer insight into quark-gluon plasma at high energies complementary to those explored at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

    NOvA Shines New Light on How Neutrinos Behave

    NOvA Shines New Light on How Neutrinos Behave

    Scientists from the NOvA collaboration have announced an exciting new result that could improve our understanding of the behavior of neutrinos.

    Smarter Self-Assembly Opens New Pathways for Nanotechnology

    Smarter Self-Assembly Opens New Pathways for Nanotechnology

    Scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have developed a way to direct the self-assembly of multiple molecular patterns within a single material, producing new nanoscale architectures. This is a significant conceptual leap in self-assembly that could change the way we design and manufacture electronics.

    Argonne Discovery Yields Self-Healing Diamond-Like Carbon

    Argonne Discovery Yields Self-Healing Diamond-Like Carbon

    A group of tribologists - scientists who study the effect of friction in machines - and computational materials scientists at Argonne recently discovered a revolutionary diamond-like film that is generated by the heat and pressure of an automotive engine. The discovery of this ultra-durable, self-lubricating tribofilm - a film that forms between moving surfaces - was first reported yesterday in the journal Nature. It could have profound implications for the efficiency and durability of future engines and other moving metal parts that can be made to develop self-healing, diamond-like carbon tribofilms.

    New X-Ray Microscopy Technique Images Nanoscale Workings of Rechargeable Batteries

    New X-Ray Microscopy Technique Images Nanoscale Workings of Rechargeable Batteries

    An X-ray microscopy technique recently developed at Berkeley Lab has given scientists the ability to image nanoscale changes inside lithium-ion battery particles as they charge and discharge. The real-time images provide a new way to learn how batteries work, and how to improve them.

    Stanford-Led Team Reveals Nanoscale Secrets of Rechargeable Batteries

    Stanford-Led Team Reveals Nanoscale Secrets of Rechargeable Batteries

    An interdisciplinary team has developed a way to track how particles charge and discharge at the nanoscale, an advance that will lead to better batteries for all sorts of mobile applications.

    ORNL Optimizes Formula for Cadmium-Tellurium Solar Cells

    ORNL Optimizes Formula for Cadmium-Tellurium Solar Cells

    Solar cells based on cadmium and tellurium could move closer to theoretical levels of efficiency because of some sleuthing by researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

    Story Tips From the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, August 2016

    Story Tips From the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, August 2016

    ORNL's PenDoc combines mass spectrometry with direct sampling to identify materials in seconds; ORNL study providing watershed-scale understanding of mercury in soils and sediments; Salt, ammonia key ingredients of high-efficiency heating system; ORNL taking closer look at microscopic soot particles, advanced combustion engines; Steel-concrete storage vessel may be ticket to clearing path for hydrogen-powered vehicles; Study examines climate change, power demands; ORNL gains better understanding of how defects in complex oxides alter behavior; Natural barrier stores carbon underground longer than previously thought.

    Scientists Model The "Flicker" of Gluons in Subatomic Smashups

    Scientists Model The "Flicker" of Gluons in Subatomic Smashups

    A new study just published in Physical Review Letters reveals that a high degree of gluon fluctuation--a kind of flickering rearrangement in the distribution of gluon density within individual protons--could help explain some of the remarkable results at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) -- a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility for nuclear physics research at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory -- and also in nuclear physics experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Europe.

    New Silicon Structures Could Make Better Biointerfaces

    New Silicon Structures Could Make Better Biointerfaces

    A team of researchers have engineered silicon particles one-fiftieth the width of a human hair, which could lead to "biointerface" systems designed to make nerve cells fire and heart cells beat.

    A New Leaf: Scientists Turn Carbon Dioxide Back Into Fuel

    A New Leaf: Scientists Turn Carbon Dioxide Back Into Fuel

    In a new study from Argonne and the University of Illinois at Chicago, researchers have found a way to convert carbon dioxide into a usable energy source.

    Diamonds Help Generate New Record for Static Pressures for Study

    Diamonds Help Generate New Record for Static Pressures for Study

    An international team working at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory has devised a method for achieving 1 terapascal of static pressure - vastly higher than any previously reached.

    ORNL-Led Study Analyzes Electric Grid Vulnerabilities in Extreme Weather Areas

    ORNL-Led Study Analyzes Electric Grid Vulnerabilities in Extreme Weather Areas

    Climate and energy scientists have developed a new method to pinpoint which electrical service areas will be most vulnerable as populations grow and temperatures rise.

    Teasing Out the Microbiome of the Kansas Prairie

    Teasing Out the Microbiome of the Kansas Prairie

    PNNL scientists have untangled a soil metagenome - all the genetic material recovered from a sample of soil - more fully than ever before, reconstructing portions of the genomes of 129 species of microbes. While it's only a tiny proportion of the species in the sample, it's a leap forward for scientists who have had only a fraction of that success to date.

    SLAC X-Ray Studies Help NASA Develop Printable Electronics for Mars Mission

    SLAC X-Ray Studies Help NASA Develop Printable Electronics for Mars Mission

    Plans begin decades in advance for a tremendous effort such as the first manned mission to Mars. The details are as fine - and essential - as how astronauts will breathe and eat and track their health.

    When the Going Gets Tough, the Tough Get Growing

    When the Going Gets Tough, the Tough Get Growing

    While relentless bright light brings many forms of cyanobacteria to their knees - figuratively, of course - Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 does the opposite, thriving and growing at a rate that far outpaces most of its peers. Now researchers know why: It triples in size to accommodate a rapid expansion of the cellular machinery it uses to build proteins.

    All E-Cigarettes Emit Harmful Chemicals, but Some Emit More Than Others

    All E-Cigarettes Emit Harmful Chemicals, but Some Emit More Than Others

    While previous studies have found that electronic cigarettes emit toxic compounds, a new study from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has pinpointed the source of these emissions and shown how factors such as the temperature, type, and age of the device play a role in emission levels, information that could be valuable to both manufacturers and regulators seeking to minimize the health impacts of these increasingly popular devices.

    New Nontoxic Process Promises Larger Ultrathin Sheets of 2D Nanomaterials

    New Nontoxic Process Promises Larger Ultrathin Sheets of 2D Nanomaterials

    Scientists have developed a novel way to produce two-dimensional nanosheets by separating bulk materials with nontoxic liquid nitrogen. The environmentally friendly process generates a 20-fold increase in surface area per sheet, which could expand the nanomaterials' commercial applications.

    Newly Discovered Material Property May Lead to High Temp Superconductivity

    Newly Discovered Material Property May Lead to High Temp Superconductivity

    Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory have discovered an unusual property of purple bronze that may point to new ways to achieve high temperature superconductivity.