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    Battery testing and prototyping facility grows to meet demand for next-generation technologies

    Battery testing and prototyping facility grows to meet demand for next-generation technologies

    Argonne recently held a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the expanded Cell Analysis, Modeling and Prototyping (CAMP) facility.

    Solving a Plasma Physics Mystery: Magnetic Reconnection

    Solving a Plasma Physics Mystery: Magnetic Reconnection

    Magnetic reconnection causes space storms that can damage satellites and disrupt the grid. While it's a common process in the universe, plasma physics researchers don't fully understand why it occurs so abruptly and quickly. New research is supporting a theory that may hold the key.

    Buy or lease? In going solar, third-party systems perform better, research finds

    An analysis of 2,000 nonresidential solar systems in California found that third-party installations have a 4 percent better production yield than systems owned directly by the businesses.

    Making a Movie of Nanocrystals' Structural Evolution

    Making a Movie of Nanocrystals' Structural Evolution

    Capturing ultrafast atomic-scale motion could help scientists optimize the performance of materials with strong electronic correlations.

    Newly Detected Microquasar Gamma-Rays 'Call for New Ideas'

    Newly Detected Microquasar Gamma-Rays 'Call for New Ideas'

    The first-ever detection of highly energetic radiation from a microquasar has astrophysicists scrambling for new theories to explain the extreme particle acceleration. A microquasar is a black hole that gobbles up debris from a nearby companion star and blasts out powerful jets of material.

    Flowing salt water over this super-hydrophobic surface can generate electricity

    Flowing salt water over this super-hydrophobic surface can generate electricity

    Engineers have developed a super-hydrophobic surface that can be used to generate electrical voltage. When salt water flows over this specially patterned surface, it can produce at least 50 millivolts. The proof-of-concept work could lead to the development of new power sources for lab-on-a-chip platforms and other microfluidics devices. It could someday be extended to energy harvesting methods in water desalination plants, researchers said.

    New fuel cell concept brings biological design to better electricity generation

    New fuel cell concept brings biological design to better electricity generation

    Fuel cells have long been viewed as a promising power source. But most fuel cells are too expensive, inefficient, or both. In a new approach, inspired by biology, a University of Wisconsin-Madison team has designed a fuel cell using cheaper materials and an organic compound that shuttles electrons and protons.

    "Choosy" Electronic Correlations Dominate Metallic State of Iron Superconductor

    "Choosy" Electronic Correlations Dominate Metallic State of Iron Superconductor

    Observation could help scientists find the universal key ingredient in the recipe for high-temperature superconductivity.

    New research could lead to more energy-efficient computing

    New research could lead to more energy-efficient computing

    Computers in the future could be more energy-efficient, thanks to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York.

    Peering into 36-million-degree plasma with SLAC's X-ray laser

    Peering into 36-million-degree plasma with SLAC's X-ray laser

    a team of researchers has used an X-ray laser to measure, for the first time, how a plasma created by a laser blast expands in the hundreds of femtoseconds (quadrillionths of a second) after it's created. Their technique could eventually reveal tiny instabilities in the plasma that swirl like cream in a cup of coffee.

    Critical Materials Institute takes major step toward printed anisotropic magnets

    Critical Materials Institute takes major step toward printed anisotropic magnets

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Critical Materials Institute has taken a major step toward printed, aligned anisotropic magnets via additive manufacturing processes.

    Single Atoms Break Carbon's Strongest Bond

    Single Atoms Break Carbon's Strongest Bond

    Scientists have developed a new catalyst for breaking carbon-fluorine bonds, one of the strongest chemical bonds known. The discovery is a breakthrough for efforts in environmental remediation and chemical synthesis.

    The Promise of Deep Grooves

    The Promise of Deep Grooves

    Argonne's sequential infiltration synthesis technique could advance computer chip manufacturing as well as other industries.

    New Report Outlines Steps to Govern Solar Radiation Management Technologies

    New Report Outlines Steps to Govern Solar Radiation Management Technologies

    New Report Outlines Steps to Govern Solar Radiation Management Technologies

    Story Tips From the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, October 2018

    Story Tips From the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, October 2018

    ORNL story tips: Recycled hard drives give magnets new life in motors; new organ-on-a-chip design to test radiation effects on cells that mimic breathing; supercomputers analyze molecules that could increase yield of certain rare earth elements important for energy applications

    Kennesaw State University: Finding New Clues

    Black holes are mysterious, but new research into black holes may shed light on the origins of life in the universe. David Garofalo, Kennesaw State University assistant professor of physics, co-authored a paper published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. The findings: the breaking up or ripping of magnetic fields near black holes may explain the way jets of energy come from black holes or contribute to that understanding.

    By Jove! Methane's Effects on Sunlight Vary by Region

    By Jove! Methane's Effects on Sunlight Vary by Region

    Solar energy absorption by methane is 10 times stronger over desert regions such as the Sahara Desert and Arabian Peninsula than elsewhere on Earth, and nearly three times more powerful in the presence of clouds. This result advances science beyond the existing "global annual-mean estimate" of methane forcing by providing insights into its remarkable spatial variability. This research enabled the first global spatially-resolved calculations of methane forcing, showing strong regional patterns.

    No Longer Whistling in the Dark: Scientists Uncover a Little-Understood Source of Waves Generated Throughout the Universe

    No Longer Whistling in the Dark: Scientists Uncover a Little-Understood Source of Waves Generated Throughout the Universe

    Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and other laboratories, using data from a NASA four-satellite mission that is studying reconnection, have developed a method for identifying the source of waves that help satellites determine their location in space.

    New biofuel production system powered by a community of algae and fungi

    New biofuel production system powered by a community of algae and fungi

    MSU scientists have a new proof of concept for a biofuel production platform that uses two species of marine algae and soil fungi. It lowers cultivation and harvesting costs and increases productivity, factors that currently hold back biofuels from being widely adopted.

    Multimodal Imaging Shows Strain Can Drive Chemistry in a Photovoltaic Material

    Multimodal Imaging Shows Strain Can Drive Chemistry in a Photovoltaic Material

    A unique combination of imaging tools and atomic-level simulations has allowed a team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory to solve a longstanding debate about the properties of a promising material that can harvest energy from light.

    Study of tiny vortices could lead to new self-healing materials, other advances

    Study of tiny vortices could lead to new self-healing materials, other advances

    Argonne scientists hope that tiny vortices, driven by various magnetic fields, will be able to move microscopic particles.

    How a Molecular Signal Helps Plant Cells Decide When to Make Oil

    How a Molecular Signal Helps Plant Cells Decide When to Make Oil

    Scientists identify new details of how a sugar-signaling molecule helps regulate oil production in plant cells. The work could point to new ways to engineer plants to produce substantial amounts of oil for use as biofuels or in the production of other oil-based products.

    Neutrons Produce First Direct 3D Maps of Water During Cell Membrane Fusion

    Neutrons Produce First Direct 3D Maps of Water During Cell Membrane Fusion

    New 3D maps of water distribution during cellular membrane fusion could lead to new treatments for diseases associated with cell fusion. Using neutron diffraction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, scientists made the first direct observations of water in lipid bilayers modeling cell membrane fusion.

    Chemists Demonstrate Sustainable Approach to Carbon Dioxide Capture From Air

    Chemists Demonstrate Sustainable Approach to Carbon Dioxide Capture From Air

    Chemists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have demonstrated a practical, energy-efficient method of capturing carbon dioxide directly from air. If deployed at large scale and coupled to geologic storage, the technique may bolster the portfolio of responses to global climate change.

    Nucleation a boon to sustainable nanomanufacturing

    Nucleation a boon to sustainable nanomanufacturing

    Young-Shin Jun, professor of energy, environmental & chemical engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, and Quingun Li, a former doctoral student in her lab, are the first to measure the activation energy and kinetic factors of calcium carbonate's nucleation, both key to predicting and controlling the process.