The DOE Science News Source is a Newswise initiative to promote research news from the Office of Science of the DOE to the public and news media.
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Newswise: Feeding Sugars to Algae Makes Them Fat
Released: 25-Jun-2019 1:05 AM EDT
Feeding Sugars to Algae Makes Them Fat
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Some microscopic green algae stop photosynthesizing and start accumulating fats and/or other valuable molecules when certain changes happen. However, scientists don’t know the details of those swift metabolic changes. A team examined a green microalga to better understand this process. After a few days of feeding this microbe sugar, it completely dismantles its photosynthetic apparatus while accumulating fat. In contrast, after the team stopped feeding it sugar, the microbe returned to its normal metabolism.

Newswise: Scientists show how one cause of weak enamel unfolds on the molecular level
Released: 25-Jun-2019 1:05 AM EDT
Scientists show how one cause of weak enamel unfolds on the molecular level
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Scientists have shown how a tiny flaw in a protein results in damaged enamel that is prone to decay in people with a condition known as amelogenesis imperfecta. Such patients don’t develop enamel correctly because of a single amino acid defect in the critical enamel protein called amelogenin.

Newswise: Explaining Light-Nuclei Production in Heavy-Ion Nuclear Collisions
Released: 24-Jun-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Explaining Light-Nuclei Production in Heavy-Ion Nuclear Collisions
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Pairs of sub-atomic particles may catalyze reactions that happened moments after the Big Bang.

Newswise: Explaining Light-Nuclei Production in Heavy-Ion Nuclear Collisions
Released: 24-Jun-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Explaining Light-Nuclei Production in Heavy-Ion Nuclear Collisions
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Pairs of sub-atomic particles may catalyze reactions that happened moments after the Big Bang.

Newswise:Video Embedded scientists-hit-pay-dirt-with-new-microbial-research-technique
VIDEO
21-Jun-2019 8:00 PM EDT
Scientists hit pay dirt with new microbial research technique
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Long ago, during the European Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci wrote that we humans “know more about the movement of celestial bodies than about the soil underfoot.” Five hundred years and innumerable technological and scientific advances later, his sentiment still holds true. But that could soon change. A new study in Nature Communications details how an improved method for studying microbes in the soil will help scientists understand both fine-grained details and large-scale cycles of the environment.

Newswise: STAR Gains Access to
Released: 21-Jun-2019 2:05 PM EDT
STAR Gains Access to "Wimpy" Quarks and Gluons
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Low-momentum (wimpy) quarks and gluons contribute to proton spin, offering insights into protons’ behavior in all visible matter.

Newswise: STAR Gains Access to
Released: 21-Jun-2019 2:05 PM EDT
STAR Gains Access to "Wimpy" Quarks and Gluons
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Low-momentum (wimpy) quarks and gluons contribute to proton spin, offering insights into protons’ behavior in all visible matter.

Newswise: Flipping the Script with Reverse D-Shaped Plasmas
Released: 21-Jun-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Flipping the Script with Reverse D-Shaped Plasmas
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Mirrored D shape demonstrates surprisingly high pressures in a tokamak, indicating a shape change may be in order for next-generation fusion reactors.

Newswise: Flipping the Script with Reverse D-Shaped Plasmas
Released: 21-Jun-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Flipping the Script with Reverse D-Shaped Plasmas
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Mirrored D shape demonstrates surprisingly high pressures in a tokamak, indicating a shape change may be in order for next-generation fusion reactors.

Newswise:Video Embedded scientists-make-first-high-res-movies-of-proteins-forming-crystals-in-a-living-cell
VIDEO
Released: 21-Jun-2019 12:05 PM EDT
Scientists make first high-res movies of proteins forming crystals in a living cell
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Scientists have made the first observations of proteins assembling themselves into crystals, one molecule at a time, in a living cell. The method they used to watch this happen – an extremely high-res form of molecular moviemaking ­– could shed light on other important biological processes and help develop nanoscale technologies inspired by nature.


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