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    The cold eyes of DUNE

    The cold eyes of DUNE

    Scientists at several DOE national laboratories working on the upcoming Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment are developing integrated electronic circuitry that can operate in DUNE's detectors at temperatures below minus 200 degrees Celsius.

    Doubts about basic assumption for the universe

    Doubts about basic assumption for the universe

    No matter where we look, the same rules apply everywhere in space: countless calculations of astrophysics are based on this basic principle. A recent study by the Universities of Bonn and Harvard, however, has thrown this principle into question.

    Amanda Early, Fermilab education program leader, selected STEP UP ambassador

    Amanda Early, Fermilab education program leader, selected STEP UP ambassador

    Amanda Early is one of 79 physics educators selected to be a STEP UP Program ambassador. STEP UP ambassadors are high school physics teachers that train others on how to effectively reduce barriers for women in physics. The program mobilizes thousands of teachers to help engage young women in physics and inspire them to pursue physics in college.

    A step ahead in the race toward ultrafast imaging of single particles

    A step ahead in the race toward ultrafast imaging of single particles

    New research from Argonne National Laboratory takes a step toward the "holy grail" of imaging: the ability to see the structure of a single, free-form molecule at atomic resolution.

    Are gamma-ray bursts powered by a star's collapsing magnetic fields?

    Are gamma-ray bursts powered by a star's collapsing magnetic fields?

    When a massive star in a distant galaxy collapses, forming a black hole, two giant jets of light-emitting plasma shoot from its core.

    Evaluating Embryo Quality with Ultrasensitive Protein Detection

    Evaluating Embryo Quality with Ultrasensitive Protein Detection

    Infertility is estimated to affect 9% of reproductive-aged couples globally, and many couples turn to assisted reproductive technology. Selecting embryos with maximum development potential plays a pivotal role in obtaining the highest rate of success in ART treatment. Researchers can evaluate the quality of an embryo by detecting the content of proteins secreted. In Biomicrofluidics, a method to detect trace proteins secreted by embryos using microfluidic droplets and multicolor fluorescence holds promise to select embryos for ART.

    Frank Hill Retires from the NSO

    Frank Hill Retires from the NSO

    One of the National Science Foundation's National Solar Observatory's longest serving scientists, Frank Hill, retired March 30, 2020, capping more than 35-years of tenure. He held a variety of roles including assistant astronomer, scientist, senior scientist and program director. Hill's latest position was as associate director of the National Solar Observatory's Integrated Synoptic Program (NISP).

    Personalized Microrobots Swim Through Biological Barriers, Deliver Drugs to Cells

    Personalized Microrobots Swim Through Biological Barriers, Deliver Drugs to Cells

    Biohybrid robots on the micrometer scale can swim through the body and deliver drugs to tumors or provide other cargo-carrying functions. To be successful, they must consist of materials that can pass through the body's immune response, swim quickly through viscous environments and penetrate tissue cells to deliver cargo. In this week's APL Bioengineering, researchers fabricated biohybrid bacterial microswimmers by combining a genetically engineered E. coli MG1655 substrain and nanoerythrosomes, small structures made from red blood cells.

    Simulations Show Extreme Opinions Can Lead to Polarized Groups

    Simulations Show Extreme Opinions Can Lead to Polarized Groups

    In this week's Chaos, researchers use a theoretical model to examine what effect extreme views have on making the entire system more polarized. The group's network-based model extends a popular approach for studying opinion dynamics, called the Cobb model, and is based on the hypothesis that those with opinions farther from the middle of a political spectrum are also less influenced by others, a trait known to social scientists as "rigidity of the extreme."

    Bubble Dynamics Reveal How to Empty Bottles Faster

    Bubble Dynamics Reveal How to Empty Bottles Faster

    Researchers from the Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee have discovered how to make bottles empty faster, which has wide-ranging implications for many areas beyond the beverage industry. In this week's Physics of Fluids, they explore this bottle-emptying phenomenon from the perspective of bubble dynamics on a commercial bottle by using high-speed photography. Image analysis allowed them to conceptualize various parameters, such as liquid film thickness, bubble aspect ratio, rise velocity and bottle emptying modes.

    The four horsemen of the COVID-19 pandemic

    The four horsemen of the COVID-19 pandemic

    It is clear that we must prioritize identifying and alleviating the conditions that made the Covid-19 pandemic possible.

    The Milky Way's Satellites Help Reveal Link Between Dark Matter Halos and Galaxy Formation

    The Milky Way's Satellites Help Reveal Link Between Dark Matter Halos and Galaxy Formation

    Just like we orbit the sun and the moon orbits us, the Milky Way has satellite galaxies with their own satellites. Drawing from data on those galactic neighbors, a new model suggests the Milky Way should have an additional 100 or so very faint satellite galaxies awaiting discovery.

    Capturing 3D microstructures in real time

    Capturing 3D microstructures in real time

    Argonne researchers have invented a machine-learning based algorithm for quantitatively characterizing material microstructure in three dimensions and in real time. This algorithm applies to most structural materials of interest to industry.

    Preparing for exascale: Eliminating disruptions on the path to sustainable fusion energy

    Preparing for exascale: Eliminating disruptions on the path to sustainable fusion energy

    With the world's most powerful path-to-exascale supercomputing resources at their disposal, William Tang and colleagues are combining computer muscle and AI to eliminate disruption of fusion reactions in the production of sustainable clean energy.

    An innovative model of the dynamic magnetic field that surrounds Mercury

    An innovative model of the dynamic magnetic field that surrounds Mercury

    The first detailed model of the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetic field that surrounds Mercury, findings that could lead to improved understanding of the stronger field around Earth.

    Story Tips: Molding matter atom by atom and seeing inside uranium particles

    Story Tips: Molding matter atom by atom and seeing inside uranium particles

    Story Tips: Molding matter atom by atom and seeing inside uranium particles, from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    CMS upgrade will shine light on Higgs boson

    CMS upgrade will shine light on Higgs boson

    Cornell is leading a $77 million effort, beginning April 1, to upgrade the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN).

    Scientists See Energy Gap Modulations in a Cuprate Superconductor

    Scientists See Energy Gap Modulations in a Cuprate Superconductor

    Scientists studying high-Tc superconductors at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have definitive evidence for the existence of a state of matter known as a pair density wave--first predicted by theorists some 50 years ago. Their results show that this phase coexists with superconductivity in a well-known bismuth-based copper-oxide superconductor.

    Celebrating 30 Years of Hubble: Discoveries Continue to Wow Scientists, Public

    Celebrating 30 Years of Hubble: Discoveries Continue to Wow Scientists, Public

    Peering into the darkness to see what we could not previously see, the Hubble Space Telescope has been delighting scientists and the general public with revealing details and images of galaxies and celestial phenomena. The American Institute of Physics recognizes and celebrates the momentous occasion of the 30th anniversary of its launch and Physics Today is highlighting the anniversary in its April issue with a look back at the history of the telescope and analysis of Hubble's discoveries over the past 30 years.

    Uncertain Climate Future Could Disrupt Energy Systems

    Uncertain Climate Future Could Disrupt Energy Systems

    An international team of scientists has published a new study proposing an optimization methodology for designing climate-resilient energy systems and to help ensure that communities will be able to meet future energy needs given weather and climate variability. Their findings were recently published in Nature Energy.

    Atomic Magnetometer Points to Better Picture of Heart Conductivity

    Atomic Magnetometer Points to Better Picture of Heart Conductivity

    Mapping the electrical conductivity of the heart would be a valuable tool in diagnosis and disease management, but doing so would require invasive procedures, which aren't capable of directly mapping dielectric properties. Significant advances have recently been made that leverage atomic magnetometers to provide a direct picture of electric conductivity of biological tissues, and in Applied Physics Letters, new work in quantum sensors points to ways such technology could be used to examine the heart.

    Extreme High-Frequency Signals Enable Terabits-Per-Second Data Links

    Extreme High-Frequency Signals Enable Terabits-Per-Second Data Links

    Using the same technology that allows high-frequency signals to travel on regular phone lines, researchers tested sending extremely high-frequency, 200 GHz signals through a pair of copper wires. The result is a link that can move data at rates of terabits per second, significantly faster than currently available channels. In Applied Physics Letters, the scientists discuss their work using experimental measurements and mathematical modeling to characterize the input and output signals in a waveguide.

    High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory Tests Speed of Light

    High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory Tests Speed of Light

    New measurements confirm, to the highest energies yet explored, that the laws of physics hold no matter where you are or how fast you're moving.

    Argonne and CERN weigh in on the origin of heavy elements

    Argonne and CERN weigh in on the origin of heavy elements

    Nuclear physicists from Argonne National Laboratory led an international physics experiment conducted at CERN that utilizes novel techniques developed at Argonne to study the nature and origin of heavy elements in the universe.