AGS Refutes President Trump’s Claim That Physicians Are Over-Counting Covid-19 Deaths for Financial Gain, in Solidarity with the CMSS

27-Oct-2020 10:00 AM EDT, by American Geriatrics Society

Newswise — New York (Oct. 26, 2020) — With its more than 6,000 members continuing to care for older Americans affected by COVID-19 at the front-line of the nation’s pandemic response, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) today stood in solidarity with the Council of Medical Special Societies (CMSS) in condemning President Trump’s claim that hospitals and physicians are inflating the number of COVID-19 deaths for their own financial gain.

“This implication is a direct affront to the professionalism and ethics of physicians and other health professionals who serve at the front-line of this pandemic at great risk to themselves and their families, often without adequate personal protective equipment,” said the CMSS — a nonprofit scientific and educational organization representing more than 800,000 doctors belonging to 45 specialty societies, including the AGS — in a statement released Sunday evening. “Many physicians have taken pay cuts to ensure that struggling medical practices and healthcare facilities remain open for their patients. Although CMSS and its member societies should not have to defend the integrity of physicians and other clinicians during a national crisis, we stand with our members who are tirelessly working to serve the needs of their patients and their communities."

President Trump made his public allegation that healthcare workers are profiting by claiming false COVID-19 diagnoses at a Saturday night rally in Waukesha, WI. This is not the first time the Trump administration and Republican allies have suggested the official COVID-19 death toll, which stands at more than 225,490 as of Monday evening, is inflated.

“These baseless claims do a disservice to all health professionals and promulgate misinformation that hinders our nation’s efforts to get the COVID-19 pandemic under control,” the CMSS concluded in its collective response. “Every American deserves a strong public health response to the pandemic based on sound science and respect for those who provide care.”

About the American Geriatrics Society

Founded in 1942, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) is a nationwide, not-for-profit society of geriatrics healthcare professionals that has—for more than 75 years—worked to improve the health, independence, and quality of life of older people. Its nearly 6,000 members include geriatricians, geriatric nurses, social workers, family practitioners, physician assistants, pharmacists, and internists. The Society provides leadership to healthcare professionals, policymakers, and the public by implementing and advocating for programs in patient care, research, professional and public education, and public policy. For more information, visit AmericanGeriatrics.org.

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