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University of California, Irvine

"People need to keep in mind that policing in the United States is an outgrowth of white plantation owners desire to keep Black bodies on their plantations"

 

Sabrina Strings, Ph.D. is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Irvine. A certified yoga teacher, her work on yoga has been featured in The Feminist Wire, Yoga International, and LA Yoga. Sabrina is also an award-winning author with publications in diverse venues including, The New York Times, Scientific American, Ethnic and Racial Studies, and Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society. Her book, Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fat Phobia (NYU Press 2019), was recently re-released as an audiobook and is available on Audible, iTunes, and Google Play. Stay up to date on her latest writings, travel and speaking engagements at SabrinaStrings.com or follow her on Twitter @SaStrings.

To interview Dr. Strings, please contact Patricia Harriman

 

“What we are experiencing right now is a pandemic in which there is this massive social movement and these two things are deeply connected. We need to keep that in mind. It’s because of the fact that people, especially Black people, are unemployed and underemployed, and then also facing racial profiling from police and then also not having enough food to feed their children.”

-Sabrina Strings Ph.D

“The problem that we're facing is an institutionalized problem. To the extent that policing in this country has a culture of maintaining a blue line, then we are able to see how systemically we're not able to get justice for the Black people who are often the targets of police violence.”

-Sabrina Strings Ph.D

“People need to keep in mind that policing in the United States is an outgrowth of white plantation owners desire to keep Black bodies on their plantations.”

-Sabrina Strings Ph.D

 

“If police want to show that they are being accountable in their actions, what they can do is that they can actually have community involvement in their policing decisions. They can train the officers to work within the community and not just to manage or control the community.”

-Sabrina Strings Ph.D

“For many of us, we feel that we are second class citizens because we know that at any moment an Amy Cooper can swoop through and call the police on us and threaten our lives.”

-Sabrina Strings Ph.D

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