Should the United States Rethink Its Nuclear Weapons Policies?

Podcast by James M. Lindsay
Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)

Host

James M. Lindsay

Senior Vice President, Director of Studies, and Maurice R. Greenberg Chair Full Bio

Episode Guests

Elbridge Colby

Co-Founder and Principal, The Marathon Initiative


Lori Esposito Murray

President, Committee for Economic Development

Show Notes

In this special Election 2020 series of The President’s Inbox, James M. Lindsay sits down each week with two experts with different views on how the United States should handle its foreign policy challenges. This week, he discusses arms control and U.S. nuclear policy with Elbridge Colby, cofounder and principal at the Marathon Initiative, and Lori Esposito Murray, president of the Committee for Economic Development.

 

Read Lindsay’s takeaways from their conversation and find further readings on his blog, The Water’s Edge.

 

The special Election 2020 episodes of The President’s Inbox are made possible in part by a grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

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