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Roy Herbst

Ensign Professor; Professor; Chief

Yale Cancer Center

Lung Cancer, Nsclc, Clinical Trials For Cancer, Yale Cancer Center, Immunotherapy

Dr. Herbst’s primary mission is the enhanced integration of clinical, laboratory, and research programs to bring new treatments to cancer patients. He has led the Phase I development of several of the new generation of targeted agents for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including gefitinib, erlotinib, cetuximab, and bevacizumab. More recently, he participated in the successful registration of pembrolizumab for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer, following the successful Yale-led KEYNOTE 10 study of the immune therapy drug commonly used to treat other cancers. He was co-leader for the BATTLE-1 clinical trial program, co-leads the subsequent BATTLE-2 clinical trial program, and served as a Co-program Leader of the Developmental Therapeutics Program for the YCC Support Grant. Dr. Herbst’s laboratory work is focused on immunotherapy angiogenesis; dual epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) inhibition in NSCLC, and targeting KRAS-activated pathways. More recently, he has explored predictive biomarkers for the use of immunotherapy agents. This work has been translated from the preclinical to clinical setting in multiple Phase II and III studies which he has led.

After earning a B.S. and M.S. degree from Yale University, Dr. Herbst earned his M.D. at Cornell University Medical College and his Ph.D. in molecular cell biology at The Rockefeller University in New York City, New York. His postgraduate training included an internship and residency in medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. His clinical fellowships in medicine and hematology were completed at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, respectively. Subsequently, Dr. Herbst completed a M.S. degree in clinical translational research at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Dr. Herbst is an author or co-author of more than 275 publications, including peer-reviewed journal articles, abstracts, and book chapters. His work has been published in many prominent journals, such as the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Clinical Cancer Research, Lancet, the New England Journal of Medicine, and Nature. His abstracts have been presented at the annual meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the World Conference on Lung Cancer, the Society of Nuclear Medicine Conference, and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer.

Dr. Herbst was a member of the National Cancer Policy Forum (1998-2014) for which he organized an Institute of Medicine meeting focused on policy issues in personalized medicine. He is a member of ASCO and, as a member of AACR, he chairs the Tobacco Task Force. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and an elected member of the Association of American Physicians. Dr. Herbst is also a member of the medical advisory committee for the Lung Cancer Research Foundation and chair of the communications committee for ASCO and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer.

He is currently the Vice Chair for Developmental Therapeutics for the Southwestern Oncology Group (SWOG) Lung Committee, Principal Investigator of the SWOG 0819 trial, and steering committee chair for the Lung Master Protocol (Lung MAP). Dr. Herbst was awarded the 2010 Waun Ki Hong Award for Excellence in Team Science by the Division of Cancer Medicine, UT-MDACC. The Alvin S. Slotnick Lecture Award for notable contributions to lung cancer research was bestowed upon him by Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center in 2014. That same year, the Bonnie Addario Foundation honored him with the Annual Addario Lectureship Award and the Bonnie J. Addario Excellence in Collaboration and Innovation Award. In 2015, the Clinical Research Forum presented his project “Predictive Correlates of Response to the Anti-PD-L1 Antibody MPDL3280A in Cancer Patients” its top Clinical Research Achievement Award in the United States for 2015. For his lifetime achievement in scientific contributions to thoracic cancer research, Herbst was awarded the 2016 Paul A. Bunn, Jr. Scientific Award by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer at IASLC 17th World Conference on Lung Cancer in Vienna, Austria. His work has been funded by ASCO, AACR, the United States Department of Defense, and the National Cancer Institute. In 2015, his team at Yale was awarded a lung cancer SPORE by the NCI, and he serves as a principal investigator for the AACR/ Stand Up to Cancer Dream Team grant.

EDUCATION & TRAINING
MMS	Harvard University, Clinical Translational Research (1997)
MD	Cornell University Medical College (1991)
PhD	Rockefeller University (1990)
BS	Yale University, Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry (1984)
MS	Yale University, Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry (1984)
Fellowship	Brigham and Women`s Hospital
Fellowship	Dana Farber Cancer Institute
Residency	Brigham and Women`s Hospital
HONORS & RECOGNITION
Elected to the Association of American Physicians
AAP (2015)

Addario Foundation Lectureship Award
Bonnie Addario Foundation (2014)

Alvin S. Slotnick Lecture Award for notable contributions to lung cancer research
Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center (2014)

Best Doctors, New York Magazine
(2014)

Honorary Professor, University College London Cancer Center
University College London (2012)

Sikand Orator
Yale University (2011)

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE
National Cancer Institute (2012 - Present)
Thoracic Malignancy Steering Committee - National Cancer Institute

Kunle Odunsi

Deputy Director, Chair of Gynecologic Oncology

Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

Cancer, Cancer Therapy, Immunotherapy, Cancer Vaccines, Vaginal Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Uterine Cancer

Deputy Director, Chair of Gynecologic Oncology and the M. Steven Piver Professor of Gynecologic Oncology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute
Areas of expertise: Ovarian cancer, uterine cancer, cervical cancer, vaginal cancer, vulvar cancer, women’s cancers, immunotherapy, cancer vaccines, cancer therapies

Angela Alistar MD

Medical Director, GI Medical Oncology, Morristown Medical Center

Atlantic Health System

Gastrointestinal Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, Clinical Trials, gi medical oncology researcher, Precision Oncology, Immunotherapy, inmmuno-oncology, cancer metabolism

David Maloney

Medical Director, Cellular Immunotherapy Integrated Research Center at Fred Hutch

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

CAR T-cell therapy, Immunotherapy, Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell, Lymphoma, Leukemia, Myeloma, cancer immunotherapies, Blood Cancers, ofatumumab, Arzerra, Hematopoietic

Physician-scientist Dr. David Maloney is at the forefront of clinical trials to develop cell therapies for blood and other cancers, including understanding side effects of CAR T’s and how to deliver them in outpatient settings. A renowned researcher and clinician focusing on cancer immunotherapies and CAR T-cell therapies, he recently presented findings from the TRANSCEND trial for CD19 CAR T. This study showed that patients had improved quality-of-life (reduced fatigue and pain symptoms) starting six months after receiving CAR T-cell therapy. 

Dr. Maloney focuses on using genetically engineered T cells (such as CAR-T) to treat patients with leukemia, lymphoma, myeloma and selected other cancers without causing graft vs. host disease that has been associated with transplantation.  He was instrumental in developing and testing rituximab, the first antibody-based cancer drug on the market – one that has transformed the treatment of certain leukemias and lymphomas.

He is also an expert on blood-forming (hematopoietic) stem cell transplantation (HCT) in using a matched donor’s (allogeneic) or a patient’s own (autologous) stem cells in treatments for patients with hematologic malignancies. Recognizing that standard pre-transplant regimens are too toxic for many patients, Dr. Maloney and Fred Hutch colleagues are evaluating approaches that use antibodies to deliver radioactivity or cancer-killing drugs directly to tumors. They have also developed a less toxic, “reduced intensity” (nonmyeloablative) regimen that can more safely provide long-term remissions for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) and myeloma after allogeneic HCT.

Autologous HCT followed by reduced intensity allogenic HCT (tandem HCT) has proven effective for refractory NHL and myeloma patients. Dr. Maloney and colleagues have learned that nearly all of the anti-tumor activity of allogeneic HCT comes from the specific graft-vs-tumor activities of donor immune T cells, showing that antitumor immunity can be curative. Unfortunately, these T cells can also cause dangerous “graft-vs-host” effects on normal tissues.

Dr. Maloney continues exploring the use of antibodies as anti-cancer therapies, including newer anti-CD20 antibodies (e.g. ofatumumab, Arzerra®) for NHL patients, as well as radiolabeled antibodies, drug-carrying antibodies and unlabeled antibodies as targeted pre-transplant “conditioning” or as “maintenance” to extend remissions after allogeneic transplantation.

As medical director of the Cellular Immunotherapy Integrated Research Center at Fred Hutch, Dr. Maloney cares for patients at the Bezos Family Immunotherapy Clinic at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, the Hutch’s clinical-care partner. He is also professor of medicine in the Division of Oncology at the University of Washington.

Bonni Guerin MD

Medical Director, Breast Cancer Treatment and Prevention Program, Overlook Medical Center

Atlantic Health System

Breast Cancer, Immunotherapy, Clinical Trials

Bonni Lee Guerin, M.D. is a hematologist/oncologist and director of the Breast Cancer Treatment and Prevention Program at Overlook Medical Center, Summit, NJ where she also serves as chair of the Breast Panel, the Multidisciplinary Breast Tumor Board and director of Oncology Education.  

She is the principal investigator of numerous clinical trials exploring new ways to incorporate the latest advances in the management of breast cancer. She is also actively involved in the delivery of highly-specialized immunotherapy, IL-2, for the treatment of melanoma and kidney cancer.

As a medical oncologist with more than 20 years of experience, Dr. Guerin is dedicated to providing the most up to date, cutting edge treatment while looking at each of her patients as an individual. Her philosophy is one of collaboration, working with all members of the care team to provide the best outcome possible. Dr. Guerin believes that compassion and being a good listener, traits she learned from her mother, help tailor a treatment plan that reflects not only the highest order of medical care, but also one that uniquely reflects each and every patient. Dr. Guerin believes it is just as much about living well as it is living long.

Dr. Guerin earned her M.D. at SUNY Stony Brook in 1988, continued her residency at Vanderbilt University in Nashville and completed her fellowship in oncology/hematology at University of California San Diego Cancer Center.  She is board certified in clinical oncology and internal medicine.

Since 2002, Dr. Guerin has served as chair of the Women’s Oncology Forum, Network for Oncology Communication and Research (NOCR) – a national organization.  She is a diplomate of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and is a recipient of the Pfizer Award for Excellence in Biochemical Research and a Member of the Expert Panel Consensus Guidelines for Systemic Therapy of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.  

She has been named by Castle Connelly as one of NY/Metro Top Doctors for the last 10 years, as well as a Top Doctor for Women's Health. She has recently been honored by Curemonos, a New Jersey non-profit organization dedicated to supporting medically underserved women with breast cancer, was the keynote speaker at the American Cancer Society Relay for Life in Chatham, NJ; and was honored at the Society’s 2019 Diamond Ball, in Woodland Park, NJ. 

Her interests are in breast cancer, hepatobiliary cancer and immunotherapy.  

Raphael Gottardo

Scientific Director, Translational Data Science Integrated Research Center

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

data-driven immunotherapy, technology convergence, Data science research, translational data, Computational Biology, Computational Science, Bioinformatics, Biostatistics, Stochastic, Flow Cytometry, data-driven research, high-speed genome sequencing

Dr. Raphael Gottardo is a computational biologist who specializes in applying rapidly evolving ideas in data science to solving problems in cancer and related diseases. As scientific director of the Translational Data Science Integrated Research Center, he is at the center of the busy intersection of biology, data science and technology at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

His goal is to expand data-driven innovations for patients by cultivating a cross-disciplinary environment in which doctors and laboratory scientists work seamlessly with their colleagues in biostatistics and computational sciences to take advantage of the flood of information made possible by advanced technologies. 

The aim is to bring scientific discoveries from research labs to the bedside sooner using data-driven approaches. To do so, bench scientists and clinical researchers from many corners of the Hutch work collaboratively with experts in data science.

Much of his work is focused on profiling the cellular components of the human immune system – using data science to understand how to make immunotherapies work better for patients. 

“It’s when you get into the details that it really becomes interesting,” he said. “The immune system is very complex, and it turns out we don’t know a whole lot about it yet. Looking at these single-cell technologies generating massive amounts of data has brought me to really cool statistical and computational challenges.”

Dr. Gottardo’s own research involves the development of computational tools for vaccine and immunology studies, including high-throughput experiments that may use flow cytometry or high-speed genome sequencing. His current studies include:
•	Statistical and computational analysis of flow cytometry data
•	Development of statistical and computational methods for single-cell genomics
•	Immune responses to malaria and HIV infection and immunization within the Human Immunology Project Consortium (HIPC)
•	Development of the HIPC database and research portal (www.immunespace.org)
•	Contribution to the Bioconductor project, an open computing resource for genomics
•	Leadership for the Vaccine and Immunology Statistical Center of the Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
•	Leadership for the Vaccine Statistical Support (VSS) Global Health Vaccine Accelerating Platform (GH-VAP) of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Dr. Gottardo is the J. Orin Edson Foundation Endowed Chair at Fred Hutch and a member of the Vaccine and Infectious Disease and Public Health Sciences Divisions. He, along with other Fred Hutch researchers, is co-leading a collaboration with the Allen Institute for Immunology to chart the human immune system by harnessing big data and emerging technologies.

An affiliate professor of statistics at the University of Washington, he teaches courses in stochastic modeling, bioinformatics and statistical computing and supervises biostatistics and statistics doctoral students on statistical-methods research for high-dimensional omics data analysis

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