Expert Directory

Showing results 1 – 9 of 9

Domestic Violence, intimate partner abuse, Intimate Partner Violence, Homicide, intimate partner homicide, Health Outcomes, Research, Nurse, Johns Hopkins, Nursing, Pregnancies, Women's Health, Gun Control, Gun Control Laws, Abuse & Trauma, abuse preventio

Jacquelyn Campbell is a national leader in research and advocacy in the field of domestic violence or intimate partner violence (IPV). Her expertise is frequently sought by national and international policy makers in exploring IPV and its health effects on families and communities. 

Her most recent research in health sequelae has been foundational for the areas of the intersection of HIV and violence against women and how head injuries and strangulation from intimate partner violence can result in undiagnosed and untreated Traumatic Brain Injury. She has consistently advocated for addressing health inequities of marginalized women in this country and globally affected by experiences of violence.  

She has served as Principle Investigator on 14 federally funded collaborative research investigations through the National Institutes of Health, National Institutes of Justice, Department of Defense, the Department of Justice (Office of Violence Against Women), and Centers for Disease Control to examine intimate partner homicide and other forms of violence against women as well as interventions and policy initiatives to improve the justice and health care system response. This work has paved the way for a growing body of interdisciplinary knowledge about experiences of violence and health outcomes, risk assessment for lethal and near-lethal domestic violence, and coordinated system (justice, social services, and health) responses to address intimate partner violence.

Dr. Campbell has published more than 270 articles, 56 book chapters and seven books, in addition to developing the Danger Assessment, an instrument to assist abused women in accurately determining their level of danger. The Danger Assessment is also the basis of the Lethality Assessment Program (MNADV LAP) for first responders to assess risk of homicide of domestic violence survivors and connect those at high risk with domestic violence services. In collaboration with Dr. Nancy Glass, originator of myPlan, a decision aid for IPV survivors, she is leading an NIH-funded cultural adaptation of myPlan for immigrant and indigenous women.

Elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2000, Dr. Campbell also was the Institute of Medicine/American Academy of Nursing/American Nurses' Foundation Senior Scholar in Residence and was founding co-chair of the IOM Forum on the Prevention of Global Violence. Other honors include the Pathfinder Distinguished Researcher by the Friends of the National Institute of Health National Institute for Nursing Research, Outstanding Alumna and Distinguished Contributions to Nursing Science Awards, Duke University School of Nursing, the American Society of Criminology Vollmer Award, and being named one of the inaugural 17 Gilman Scholars at Johns Hopkins University. She is on the Board of Directors for Futures Without Violence, is an active member of the Johns Hopkins Women’s Health Research Group, and has served on the boards of the House of Ruth Battered Women's Shelter and four other shelters. She was a member of the congressionally appointed U.S. Department of Defense Task Force on Domestic Violence. 

Deborah Gross, DNSc, RN, FAAN

Endowed Chair in Psychiatric Nursing

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

Mental Health, mental health and children , Parenting, Parenting Advice, parenting intervention, Child Psychology, Suicide, Research, Nurse, Nursing, Johns Hopkins, Chicago Parent Program, Behavior, Behavior Problem, Community Health, Public School, Psycho

Deborah Gross is best known for her work in promoting positive parent-child relationships and preventing behavior problems in preschool children from low-income neighborhoods. At Johns Hopkins, she holds joint appointments at the School of Nursing, the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences in the School of Medicine, and the Department of Mental Health in the Bloomberg School of Public Health. Previously, as associate dean for research and a department chair at Rush University College of Nursing, Dr. Gross and colleagues developed the innovative Chicago Parent Program, which improves parenting behavior and reduces child behavior problems. The program currently is used in a number of settings, including Head Start centers in Chicago and New York City. Dr. Gross was a Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellow, and among her many recognitions are the Friends of the National Institute for Nursing Research President's Award for outstanding research, the American Academy of Nursing Edge Runner award honoring developers of model programs offering solutions to healthcare challenges, and induction into the Sigma Theta Tau Researchers Hall of Fame. She has served on numerous review panels for the National Institutes of Health and the Institute of Medicine, published more than 100 articles, book chapters, and abstracts, and currently serves on the editorial board of Research in Nursing & Health and Nursing Outlook.

Organizational Change, Resilience, Risk Management, Medical Mistakes, Uncertainty, Organization, Johns Hopkins, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School

Kathleen M. Sutcliffe, PhD, is the Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Business and Medicine at Johns Hopkins University. Her research explores how organizations and their members cope with uncertainty and unexpected surprises, and how organizations can be designed to be more reliable and resilient. She is currently investigating these issues in healthcare as well as in wild-land firefighting, oil and gas exploration, and other dynamic high-risk industries. Her 2019 book, Still Not Safe: Patient Safety and the Middle-Managing of American Medicine, looks at how the health care industry has responded to medical errors over the last 20 years.

Health Care, Health Care Policy, health care economics, Public Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Of Public Health, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School

Dan Polsky is a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Health Policy and Economics at Johns Hopkins University. Prior to joining Hopkins served as Executive Director of the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics from 2012 - 2019 and was a professor at the University of Pennsylvania in the Perelman School of Medicine and the Wharton School of Business. His research seeks an advanced understanding of the cost and quality tradeoff of health care intervention that addresses care, access, coverage, and payment.

causal inference, Economics, Behavioral Economics, Behavioral Science, Environmental Policy, Johns Hopkins, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School

Paul J. Ferraro, PhD, is the Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Business and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Ferraro has a joint faculty appointment in the Whiting School of Engineering and the Carey Business School. His research focuses on behavioral economics and the design and evaluation of environmental programs in the private and public sectors. Because these research areas are multi-disciplinary and applied, he collaborates with scientists and engineers from a variety of social, natural and physical science disciplines, as well as practitioners in the field.

Phillip Phan, PhD

Alonzo and Virginia Decker Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship

Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School

Technology Transfer and Commercialization, Entreprenership, Medicine, strategic management , Technology, Johns Hopkins, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School

Phillip Phan, PhD, is the Alonzo and Virginia Decker Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship and joined the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School in 2008. He is a professor in the research track with expertise in the areas of technology entrepreneurship and strategic management.

Marketing, Consumer decision-making, Decision Making, Inequality, Inefficiency, marketing cues, comparison shopping, consumer judgment, Preferences, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School

Meng Zhu is an associate professor at the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School and specializing in marketing and consumer decision-making. She joined the Carey Business School after receiving her PhD from Carnegie Mellon University. Her research interests include consumer judgment and decision-making, contextual influences on preference construction, the causes of and solutions to inefficiency and inequality, and the impact of marketing cues and comparison standards.

prosocial behavior, Intrinsic Reward, Extrinsic Values, Moral Behavior, moral decisions, Global Health, Experimental Economics, development economics, Labor, Human Resources, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School, Johns Hopkins Medicine

Mario Macis, PhD (Economics, University of Chicago) is an associate professor in the research track with expertise in the areas of prosocial behavior, morally controversial transactions, global health, experimental economics, development economics, and labor economics. He is also Affiliate Faculty at the JHU Berman Institute of Bioethics, Associate Faculty at the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality at JHU Medicine, Faculty Research Fellow in the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), and Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA). Dr. Macis has been a consultant for the World Bank, the International Labor Organization, the National Marrow Donor Program, and the United Nations Development Programme.

Health Economics, Children's Health, development economics, Health Policy, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School, congestion pricing

Emilia Simeonova, PhD (Economics from Columbia University in 2008) joined Johns Hopkins Carey Business School in 2013 from Tufts University. Between 2011-2012 she was a research fellow at the Center for Health and Wellbeing at Princeton University. Emilia’s research interests in the economics of health care delivery, patient adherence to therapy and the interaction between physicians and patients, racial disparities in health outcomes, the long-term effects of shocks to children's health and intergenerational transmission of health.  Her research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the Swedish Research Council and the Danish Academy of Sciences. 

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