Expert Directory

Showing results 1 – 13 of 13

Domestic Violence, intimate partner abuse, Intimate Partner Violence, Homicide, intimate partner homicide, Health Outcomes, Research, Nurse, Johns Hopkins, Nursing, Pregnancies, Women's Health, Gun Control, Gun Control Laws, Abuse & Trauma, abuse preventio

Jacquelyn Campbell is a national leader in research and advocacy in the field of domestic violence or intimate partner violence (IPV). Her expertise is frequently sought by national and international policy makers in exploring IPV and its health effects on families and communities. 

Her most recent research in health sequelae has been foundational for the areas of the intersection of HIV and violence against women and how head injuries and strangulation from intimate partner violence can result in undiagnosed and untreated Traumatic Brain Injury. She has consistently advocated for addressing health inequities of marginalized women in this country and globally affected by experiences of violence.  

She has served as Principle Investigator on 14 federally funded collaborative research investigations through the National Institutes of Health, National Institutes of Justice, Department of Defense, the Department of Justice (Office of Violence Against Women), and Centers for Disease Control to examine intimate partner homicide and other forms of violence against women as well as interventions and policy initiatives to improve the justice and health care system response. This work has paved the way for a growing body of interdisciplinary knowledge about experiences of violence and health outcomes, risk assessment for lethal and near-lethal domestic violence, and coordinated system (justice, social services, and health) responses to address intimate partner violence.

Dr. Campbell has published more than 270 articles, 56 book chapters and seven books, in addition to developing the Danger Assessment, an instrument to assist abused women in accurately determining their level of danger. The Danger Assessment is also the basis of the Lethality Assessment Program (MNADV LAP) for first responders to assess risk of homicide of domestic violence survivors and connect those at high risk with domestic violence services. In collaboration with Dr. Nancy Glass, originator of myPlan, a decision aid for IPV survivors, she is leading an NIH-funded cultural adaptation of myPlan for immigrant and indigenous women.

Elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2000, Dr. Campbell also was the Institute of Medicine/American Academy of Nursing/American Nurses' Foundation Senior Scholar in Residence and was founding co-chair of the IOM Forum on the Prevention of Global Violence. Other honors include the Pathfinder Distinguished Researcher by the Friends of the National Institute of Health National Institute for Nursing Research, Outstanding Alumna and Distinguished Contributions to Nursing Science Awards, Duke University School of Nursing, the American Society of Criminology Vollmer Award, and being named one of the inaugural 17 Gilman Scholars at Johns Hopkins University. She is on the Board of Directors for Futures Without Violence, is an active member of the Johns Hopkins Women’s Health Research Group, and has served on the boards of the House of Ruth Battered Women's Shelter and four other shelters. She was a member of the congressionally appointed U.S. Department of Defense Task Force on Domestic Violence. 

History, Civil Rights, Reconstruction, Law

Donald Nieman is Binghamton University’s Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and also Professor of History. His research focuses on law, race, and civil rights in U.S. history, emphasizing the role that African Americans have played in using law and the Constitution to expand the nation’s understanding of citizenship, rights, politics, and the Constitution.

Sociology, Islam, islamic law, Conflict Resolution, Democratization, Politics

Larémont is a Carnegie Corporation Scholar on Islam, and a leading expert on political Islam, Islamic law, conflict resolution, democratization, and civil/military relations. His work focuses on North Africa and the Sahel.

Scotus, Supreme Court, criminal law, Constitution, Federal Courts

Epps is a nationally recognized expert on the Supreme Court. A former law clerk to Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, Epps focuses on criminal law and criminal procedure – and his scholarly approach draws upon history, philosophy, political science and economics. His research analyzes the criminal justice system using the tools and insights of structural public law and institutional design; he also researches and writes about constitutional theory and federal courts. His scholarship has appeared in the Harvard Law Review, the Yale Law Journal, the Michigan Law Review, and the NYU Law Review, and his writing for popular audiences has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, the Washington Post, Vox and The Atlantic.

Big Pharma, Health Policy, Drug Law, Drug Regulation, Health Law

Sachs is a renowned expert on health policy and drug law. She is a scholar of innovation policy whose work explores the interaction of intellectual property law, food and drug regulation and health law. Her work explores problems of innovation and access to new health care technologies. Sachs’ scholarship has or will have appeared in journals that include the Michigan Law Review, the Minnesota Law Review, the Harvard Law Review, the New England Journal of Medicine, and the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Environment, Climate Change, Law, Clean Air Act, Air Pollution

Janet McCabe is director of the Environmental Resilience Institute at Indiana University and a professor of practice at the IU McKinney School of Law.

From July 2013 to January 2017, McCabe was the acting assistant administrator for the Office of Air and Radiation (OAR) at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and was nominated by President Barack Obama to be assistant administrator of that office. She joined EPA in November 2009, serving as the principal deputy to the assistant administrator of OAR. 

Prior to joining EPA, McCabe was executive director of Improving Kids’ Environment, Inc., a children’s environmental health advocacy organization based in Indianapolis, Ind., and was an adjunct faculty member at the IU School of Medicine, Department of Public Health, and at the School of Public and Environmental Affairs. From 1993 to 2005, she held several leadership positions in the Indiana Department of Environmental Management’s Office of Air Quality and was the office’s assistant commissioner from 1998 to 2005. 

Before coming to Indiana in 1993, McCabe served as assistant attorney general for environmental protection for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and assistant secretary for Environmental Impact Review. McCabe grew up in Washington, DC and graduated from Harvard College in 1980 and Harvard Law School in 1983.

Ge Bai, PhD, CPA

Associate Professor of Accounting, Health Policy, and Management

Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School

healthcare administration, finace, Accounting, healthcare pricing, Healthcare Management, Health Policy, Healthcare Access, healthcare business, healthcare decision making, Healthcare economics, healthcare information, Healthcare Law

Ge Bai, PhD, CPA is an associate professor of Accounting at Johns Hopkins Carey Business School and associate professor of Health Policy & Management at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She is an expert on health care pricing, policy, and management. Dr. Bai has testified before House Ways and Means Committee, written for the Wall Street Journal, and published her studies in leading academic journals such as the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, JAMA Internal Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, and Health Affairs. Her work has been widely featured in ABC, Atlantic, CBS, CNN, Forbes, Fox News, Los Angeles Times, NBC, New York Times, NPR, The Guardian, U.S. News & World Report, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and other media and used in government regulations and congressional testimonies.  

Health Law, Public Health, Human Rights

James Hodge is a national expert on emergency legal preparedness, obesity laws and policies, vaccination laws and public health information privacy. 
His work on these and other topics has been cited in various publications including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post and additional regional newspapers, social media cites and journals.

Hodge is the Peter Kiewit Foundation Professor of Law at the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law and Director of the Center for Public Health Law and Policy at ASU. Through scholarship, teaching, and applied projects, Professor Hodge delves into multiple areas of health law, public health law, global health law, ethics, and human rights.

Professor Hodge advises numerous federal, state, and local governments on public health law and policy issues and has lectured extensively on diverse topics in international locations including Sydney, Toronto and Barcelona. 

Riaz Tejani, Ph.D. anthropology, JD

Associate Professor of Business Ethics

University of Redlands

Business Ethics, law and ethics, education and ethics

Riaz Tejani is an Associate Professor of Business Ethics. His research examines problems in legal and business ethics with a focus on race and class inequality, access to justice, and higher education. Riaz's first book, Law Mart: Justice, Access, and For-Profit Law Schools (2017), is an ethnographic account of for-profit legal education during and after the global financial crisis. His second book, Law and Society Today (forthcoming 2019), critically surveys contemporary themes in socio-legal studies after "law and economics". Riaz serves on the National Advisory Council of the non-profit research center Law School Transparency, and his recent articles have appeared in American Ethnologist, U.C. Irvine Law Review, and Political and Legal Anthropology Review. His work has been cited or reviewed in outlets including the Harvard Law Review, Yale Law Journal Forum, Annual Review of Law and Social Science, The Nation, Huffington Post, Salon, and NPR. 

law and business , policy planning, Public Policy, Politics, International Relations

Anne-Marie Slaughter is the CEO of New America, a think ​and action ​tank dedicated to renewing the promise of America, bringing us closer to our nation's highest ideals. She is also the Bert G. Kerstetter '66 University Professor Emerita of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University. From 2009–2011, she served as director of policy planning for the United States Department of State, the first woman to hold that position. Upon leaving the State Department she received the Secretary’s Distinguished Service Award for her work leading the Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review, as well as meritorious service awards from USAID and the Supreme Allied Commander for Europe. Prior to her government service, Dr. Slaughter was the Dean of Princeton University's School of Public and International Affairs (formerly the Woodrow Wilson School) from 2002–2009 and the J. Sinclair Armstrong Professor of International, Foreign, and Comparative Law at Harvard Law School from 1994-2002.

Dr. Slaughter has written or edited eight​ books, including ​The Chessboard and the Web: Strategies of Connection in a Networked World (2017)​, Unfinished Business: Women, Men, Work, Family (2015), The Idea That Is America: Keeping Faith with Our Values in a Dangerous World (2007)​, and ​A New World Order (2004), ​as well as over 100 scholarly articles. She was the convener and academic co-chair, with Professor John Ikenberry, of the Princeton Project on National Security, a multi-year research project aimed at developing a new, bipartisan national security strategy for the United States. In 2012 she published the article “Why Women Still Can’t Have It All,” in the Atlantic, which quickly became the most-read article in the history of the magazine and helped spawn a renewed national debate on the continued obstacles to genuine full male-female equality.

Dr. Slaughter is a contributing editor to the Financial Times and writes a bi-monthly column for Project Syndicate. She provides frequent commentary for both mainstream and new media and curates foreign policy news for over 140,000 followers on Twitter. Foreign Policy magazine named her to their annual list of the Top 100 Global Thinkers in 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012. She received a B.A. from Princeton, an M.Phil and D.Phil in international relations from Oxford, where she was a Daniel M. Sachs Scholar, and a J.D. from Harvard. 

Evan Starr , Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Management & Organization

University of Maryland, Robert H. Smith School of Business

Entrepreneurship, Innovation, Noncompete Labor Agreements, Employee Mobility, Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Labor Economics, law and economics, Strategic Human Capital

Evan Starr is an Assistant Professor of Management & Organization at the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan and a bachelor's degree from Denison University. He originally hails from Claremont, California. Starr's current research examines issues at the intersection of human capital accumulation, employee mobility, entrepreneurship, and innovation. In a recent set of projects utilizing employee-employer matched data and survey data that he and coauthors developed, Starr examined the use and impacts of noncompete agreements and their enforceability on the provision of firm-sponsored training, employee mobility and earnings, and on the creation, growth, and survival of new ventures.

Edward Maguire

Professor, School of Criminology & Criminal Justice

Arizona State University (ASU)

Policing, Protest, Riots, Law Enforcement

Edward Maguire is an expert on policing and violence. His research involves the application of criminology to the study of crime and justice issues in the developing world. 

His recent research has focused on procedural justice and legitimacy, police response to protests, gangs and gang violence, officer safety and wellness, and evaluating the impact of violent crime control initiatives.

Maguire is a professor of criminology and criminal justice, where he also serves as an associate director of the Center for Violence Prevention and Community Safety. 

He has also written and edited five books and more than 90 journal articles and book chapters on various themes related to policing, violence, gangs, research methodology, and comparative criminology. 

His most recent work includes "Transforming the Police: Thirteen Key Reforms," which he co-edited with his ASU criminology colleagues. The book offer fresh, research-based perspectives to help law enforcement officials make better-informed decisions about running their agencies and best apply strategies and tactics.

Paul Schiff Berman

Walter S. Cox Professor of Law

George Washington University

Law, Globalization, U.S. Courts, Supreme Court

Paul Schiff Berman, the Walter S. Cox Professor of Law at The George Washington University Law School, is one of the world’s foremost theorists on the effect of globalization on the interactions among legal systems. He recently edited The Oxford Handbook of Global Legal Pluralism (Oxford University Press 2020) is the author of over sixty scholarly works, including Global Legal Pluralism: A Jurisprudence of Law Beyond Borders, published by Cambridge University Press in 2012. He was also among the first legal scholars to focus on legal issues regarding online activity, and he is co-author of one of the leading casebooks in the field.

In addition to his scholarly work, Professor Berman has extensive experience in university and law school administration, having served as Vice Provost for Online Education and Academic Innovation at The George Washington University from 2013-16; Dean of The George Washington University Law School from 2011-13; and Dean of the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University from 2008-11. Professor Berman has previously served as the Jesse Root Professor of Law at the University of Connecticut School of Law, where he taught from 1998-2008. For the 2006–07 academic year, Professor Berman was a Visiting Professor and Visiting Research Scholar at Princeton University in the Program in Law and Public Affairs. Since 2016, he has been a visiting global scholar at Queen Mary University of London, in 2014 he was a Distinguished Visiting Lecturer at the Centre for Transnational Studies at the University of Bremen, Germany, and in 2018, he was Distinguished Visiting Professor at Southern Cross University in Australia. He also has served two terms on the Organizing Committee of the Association for the Study of Law, Culture, and the Humanities and was Chair of the International Law and Technology Interest Group of the American Society of International Law.

Professor Berman graduated summa cum laude from Princeton University in 1988 and earned his law degree from New York University in 1995. During law school, he served as Managing Editor of the NYU Law Review and received the University Graduation Prize for the graduating law student with the highest cumulative grade point average. He later clerked for Chief Judge Harry T. Edwards of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg of the Supreme Court of the United States.

Prior to entering law school, Professor Berman was a Professional Theater Director in New York City and Artistic Director of Spin Theater, a not-for-profit theater company. He was also administrative director of two other not-for-profit theater companies in New York City: The Wooster Group and Richard Foreman’s Ontological-Hysteric Theatre at St. Mark’s Church.

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