Expert Directory

Showing results 1 – 4 of 4

Domestic Violence, intimate partner abuse, Intimate Partner Violence, Homicide, intimate partner homicide, Health Outcomes, Research, Nurse, Johns Hopkins, Nursing, Pregnancies, Women's Health, Gun Control, Gun Control Laws, Abuse & Trauma, abuse preventio

Jacquelyn Campbell is a national leader in research and advocacy in the field of domestic violence or intimate partner violence (IPV). Her expertise is frequently sought by national and international policy makers in exploring IPV and its health effects on families and communities. 

Her most recent research in health sequelae has been foundational for the areas of the intersection of HIV and violence against women and how head injuries and strangulation from intimate partner violence can result in undiagnosed and untreated Traumatic Brain Injury. She has consistently advocated for addressing health inequities of marginalized women in this country and globally affected by experiences of violence.  

She has served as Principle Investigator on 14 federally funded collaborative research investigations through the National Institutes of Health, National Institutes of Justice, Department of Defense, the Department of Justice (Office of Violence Against Women), and Centers for Disease Control to examine intimate partner homicide and other forms of violence against women as well as interventions and policy initiatives to improve the justice and health care system response. This work has paved the way for a growing body of interdisciplinary knowledge about experiences of violence and health outcomes, risk assessment for lethal and near-lethal domestic violence, and coordinated system (justice, social services, and health) responses to address intimate partner violence.

Dr. Campbell has published more than 270 articles, 56 book chapters and seven books, in addition to developing the Danger Assessment, an instrument to assist abused women in accurately determining their level of danger. The Danger Assessment is also the basis of the Lethality Assessment Program (MNADV LAP) for first responders to assess risk of homicide of domestic violence survivors and connect those at high risk with domestic violence services. In collaboration with Dr. Nancy Glass, originator of myPlan, a decision aid for IPV survivors, she is leading an NIH-funded cultural adaptation of myPlan for immigrant and indigenous women.

Elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2000, Dr. Campbell also was the Institute of Medicine/American Academy of Nursing/American Nurses' Foundation Senior Scholar in Residence and was founding co-chair of the IOM Forum on the Prevention of Global Violence. Other honors include the Pathfinder Distinguished Researcher by the Friends of the National Institute of Health National Institute for Nursing Research, Outstanding Alumna and Distinguished Contributions to Nursing Science Awards, Duke University School of Nursing, the American Society of Criminology Vollmer Award, and being named one of the inaugural 17 Gilman Scholars at Johns Hopkins University. She is on the Board of Directors for Futures Without Violence, is an active member of the Johns Hopkins Women’s Health Research Group, and has served on the boards of the House of Ruth Battered Women's Shelter and four other shelters. She was a member of the congressionally appointed U.S. Department of Defense Task Force on Domestic Violence. 

Aging, Gerontolgoy, Aging In Place, Housing, housing access, Older Adults, Nursing Home, Community Health, Occupational Therapist, health disparites, Health Policy, Nurse Practitioner, Homebound Patients, low-income communities, health care savings, Nurse,

A number of years ago, while making house calls as a nurse practitioner to homebound, low-income elderly patients in West Baltimore, Sarah Szanton noticed that their environmental challenges were often as pressing as their health challenges. Since then she has developed a program of research at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing on the role of the environment and stressors in health disparities in older adults, particularly those trying to “age in place” or stay out of a nursing home. The result is a program called CAPABLE, which combines handyman services with nursing and occupational therapy to improve mobility, reduce disability, and decrease healthcare costs. She is currently examining the program's effectiveness through grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Innovations Office at the Center on Medicaid and Medicare Services. She is also conducting a study, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, of whether food and energy assistance improve health outcomes for low-income older adults. A former health policy advocate, Dr. Szanton aims her research and publications toward changing policy for older adults and their families.

Deborah Gross, DNSc, RN, FAAN

Endowed Chair in Psychiatric Nursing

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

Mental Health, mental health and children , Parenting, Parenting Advice, parenting intervention, Child Psychology, Suicide, Research, Nurse, Nursing, Johns Hopkins, Chicago Parent Program, Behavior, Behavior Problem, Community Health, Public School, Psycho

Deborah Gross is best known for her work in promoting positive parent-child relationships and preventing behavior problems in preschool children from low-income neighborhoods. At Johns Hopkins, she holds joint appointments at the School of Nursing, the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences in the School of Medicine, and the Department of Mental Health in the Bloomberg School of Public Health. Previously, as associate dean for research and a department chair at Rush University College of Nursing, Dr. Gross and colleagues developed the innovative Chicago Parent Program, which improves parenting behavior and reduces child behavior problems. The program currently is used in a number of settings, including Head Start centers in Chicago and New York City. Dr. Gross was a Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellow, and among her many recognitions are the Friends of the National Institute for Nursing Research President's Award for outstanding research, the American Academy of Nursing Edge Runner award honoring developers of model programs offering solutions to healthcare challenges, and induction into the Sigma Theta Tau Researchers Hall of Fame. She has served on numerous review panels for the National Institutes of Health and the Institute of Medicine, published more than 100 articles, book chapters, and abstracts, and currently serves on the editorial board of Research in Nursing & Health and Nursing Outlook.

Eileen Sullivan-Marx, PhD, RN, FAAN

Dean and Prof., NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing

New York University

Nursing, Nurses, Aging, Gerontolgoy, Medicaid, Medicare, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Primary Care, Advanced Practice Nurses, advanced practice nursing

Eileen Sullivan-Marx, PhD, RN, FAAN, is the dean of the New York University Rory Meyers College of Nursing and the Erline Perkins McGriff Professor of Nursing. She is a distinguished nursing leader, educator, and clinician known for research and innovative approaches in primary care, testing methods of payment for nurses particularly with Medicaid and Medicare, sustaining models of care using advanced practice nurses locally and globally, and developing health policy in community-based settings. 

With a strong belief in the integration of practice, research, education, and interdisciplinary team work, Sullivan-Marx has built and sustained models of team care including a private family practice, growing a Program of All Inclusive Care for Elders (PACE) from 75 to 525 people in five years that saved the state of Pennsylvania fifteen cents on the dollar in Medicaid funding, and launched numerous older adult team programs in academic centers as well as the Veterans Administration. 

Sullivan-Marx will serve as the president of the American Academy of Nursing from October 2019 through October 2021. She is active in regional, state, and national policy, and served as an American Political Science Congressional Fellow and Senior Advisor to the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services Office of Medicaid and Medicare Coordination in 2010, just after the passage of the Affordable Care Act. 

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