Steven K. Libutti, MD, FACS, was appointed as Director of Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Vice Chancellor for Cancer Programs, Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences in January 2017. In addition to his leadership roles within Rutgers University, Dr. Libutti also serves as Senior Vice President of Oncology Services for RWJBarnabas Health, further strengthening the university’s partnership with the healthcare system. He is also a Professor of Surgery at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and an Affiliated Distinguished Professor in Genetics at the Rutgers School of Arts and Sciences Department of Genetics.

Most recently, Dr. Libutti served as Director for the Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care in New York City and was a Professor and Vice Chairman of the Department of Surgery and Professor in the Department of Genetics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System. A surgical oncologist, Dr. Libutti is an internationally known expert in endocrine surgery and the management of neuroendocrine tumors. He is the immediate Past President of the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons. His clinical practice focuses on gastrointestinal malignancies including cancers of the liver and pancreas.

The recipient of funding from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) for the past 20 years, Dr. Libutti is also a researcher whose work focuses on developing novel cancer therapies through an understanding of the tumor microenvironment and blood vessel formation in tumors. He is studying tumor neovascular formation and the interaction between tumor cells, endothelial cells and the components of the tumor microenvironment including fibroblasts and cancer stem cells. His work also focuses on a better understanding of the tumor suppressor genes MEN1 and FILIP1L.

After graduating magna cum laude from Harvard College, Dr. Libutti received his medical degree from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University. He remained at Presbyterian Hospital in New York where he completed his residency in surgery, followed by a fellowship at the NCI in surgical oncology and endocrine surgery. He continued at the NCI where he became a tenured Senior Investigator and Chief of the Tumor Angiogenesis Section in the Surgery Branch.  He has published over 280 peer reviewed journal articles, is Editor-in-Chief of the Nature Journal Cancer Gene Therapy, and holds seven U.S. patents. 

Clinical Expertise:
Neuroendocrine tumors, thyroid cancer, parathyroid tumors, pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, minimally invasive surgery, and clinical trials.


Title

Cited By

Year

von Hippel-Lindau disease

1388

2003

Phase I and pharmacokinetic studies of CYT-6091, a novel PEGylated colloidal gold-rhTNF nanomedicine

541

2010

Pulsed-high intensity focused ultrasound and low temperature–sensitive liposomes for enhanced targeted drug delivery and antitumor effect

438

2007

A mouse model of multiple endocrine neoplasia, type 1, develops multiple endocrine tumors

434

2001

Somatic and germline CACNA1D calcium channel mutations in aldosterone-producing adenomas and primary aldosteronism

408

2013

Systemic cancer therapy with a tumor-selective vaccinia virus mutant lacking thymidine kinase and vaccinia growth factor genes

389

2001

Tissue bonding and sealing composition and method of using the same

367

1993

Analysis of factors associated with outcome in patients with malignant peritoneal mesothelioma undergoing surgical debulking and intraperitoneal chemotherapy

365

2003

Tissue bonding and sealing composition and method of using the same

320

1994

MicroRNA dynamics in the stages of tumorigenesis correlate with hallmark capabilities of cancer

295

2009

Liposomes complexed to plasmids encoding angiostatin and endostatin inhibit breast cancer in nude mice

285

1999

Gene expression profiles derived from fine needle aspiration correlate with response to systemic chemotherapy in breast cancer

269

2002

Current advances in molecular imaging: noninvasive in vivo bioluminescent and fluorescent optical imaging in cancer research

249

2003

Forty-eight-hour fast: the diagnostic test for insulinoma

249

2000

Isolated hepatic perfusion with tumor necrosis factor and melphalan for unresectable cancers confined to the liver.

233

1998

Multiple neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas in von Hippel-Lindau disease patients: histopathological and molecular genetic analysis

231

1998

Clinical, genetic and radiographic analysis of 108 patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL) manifested by pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs)

224

2007

Characterization of a novel tumor-derived cytokine. Endothelial-monocyte activating polypeptide II.

221

1994

Somatostatin Receptor Imaging with 68Ga DOTATATE PET/CT: Clinical Utility, Normal Patterns, Pearls, and Pitfalls in Interpretation

219

2015

Advantages of mRNA amplification for microarray analysis

199

2002

What Does it Mean to be An NCI-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center?

Rutgers Cancer Institute is a National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, a designation reserved for those cancer centers who meet the highest of standards in research, treatment, prevention and education. Rutgers Cancer Institute expert explains why this distinction sets Rutgers Cancer Institute and RWJBarnabas Health apart.
17-Aug-2020 08:35:49 AM EDT

Rutgers Cancer Institute Offers Clinical Trial Examining Potential Treatment for COVID-19

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, a National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, is offering a clinical trial as a potential treatment for patients diagnosed with the coronavirus (COVID-19). The trial, which is not limited to cancer patients is exploring hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin.
03-Apr-2020 01:35:57 PM EDT

“We defined January of 2018 as the start of this integrated model with RWJBarnabas. Prior to that, analytic cancer cases at the cancer institute were around 3,000 a year. In 2018, with this new integrated model across the health system, we are at just over 10,000 combined. And again, to put that in perspective, there are 50,000 new cancer diagnoses a year in the state of New Jersey. So, in 2018, we represented approximately 20 percent of the new cancer diagnoses in the state.”

- Libutti: How Rutgers Cancer Institute became a New Jersey-sized colossus

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