Jennifer Chatman is a world-renowned researcher, teacher & consultant on leveraging organizational culture for firm performance and leading high-performance teams.

Chatman is the Paul J. Cortese Distinguished Professor of Management and a faculty member in the Management of Organizations (MORS) Group at Berkeley Haas. In her research, teaching, and consulting work, she focuses on how organizations can leverage culture for strategic success and how diverse teams can optimize performance. Her award-winning research has shown, for example, how emphasizing innovation in the context of a strong culture increases firms’ financial success, how narcissistic leaders create organizational cultures lower in collaboration and integrity, and how norms to cooperate can cause members to blur differences among them, even if those differences are useful for group performance—suggesting that collaboration should be calibrated in diverse teams.

Chatman is the Co-Director of the Berkeley Culture Initiative, the Assistant Dean for Learning Strategies at the Haas School of Business, an Editor for the journal Research in Organizational Behavior, and runs the Leading High Performance Cultures executive education program. She has served in many other leadership roles at Haas and UC Berkeley over the years. Chatman earned her PhD at Berkeley Haas, and her BA in Psychology from UC Berkeley.


Title

Cited By

Year

People and organizational culture: A profile comparison approach to assessing person-organization fit

6281

1991

People and organizational culture: A profile comparison approach to assessing person-organization fit

6278

1991

People and organizational culture: A profile comparison approach to assessing person-organization fit

6278

1991

Organizational commitment and psychological attachment: The effects of compliance, identification, and internalization on prosocial behavior.

6173

1986

Organizational commitment and psychological attachment: The effects of compliance, identification, and internalization on prosocial behavior.

6170

1986

Organizational commitment and psychological attachment: The effects of compliance, identification, and internalization on prosocial behavior.

6170

1986

Organizational commitment and psychological attachment: The effects of compliance, identification, and internalization on prosocial behavior.

6170

1986

Matching people and organizations: Selection and socialization in public accounting firms.

3354

1991

Matching people and organizations: Selection and socialization in public accounting firms.

3354

1991

Improving interactional organizational research: A model of person-organization fit

2833

1989

Culture as Social Control: Corporations, cults and commitment

1550

1996

Culture as social control: Corporations, cults, and commitment.

1550

1996

Assessing the relationship between industry characteristics and organizational culture: how different can you be?

1243

1994

Being different yet feeling similar: The influence of demographic composition and organizational culture on work processes and outcomes

1117

1998

The influence of demographic heterogeneity on the emergence and consequences of cooperative norms in work teams

975

2001

Building organizational commitment: A multifirm study

749

1990

Personality, organizational culture, and cooperation: Evidence from a business simulation

704

1995

The thinking organization

535

1986

Knowing your place: self-perceptions of status in face-to-face groups.

496

2006

THE INFLUENCE OF PROPORTIONAL AND PERCEPTUAL CONFLICTCOMPOSITION ON TEAM PERFORMANCE.

495

2000

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“We have a hard time distinguishing the features that make for a good leader from the features that are associated with narcissism. The whole point of an organization is to try to do something together”.

- Prof. Jennifer Chatman on Elon Musk & Narcissism

"Getting people to join a multilevel marketing company usually involves a small initial hurdle, maybe they have some success selling a little bit and they buy a little bit more. So there's a kind of escalation cycle that occurs".

- People who sell for multilevel marketing companies look wildly successful on Facebook, but the reality is much more complicated

"Jargon masks real meaning. People use it as a substitute for thinking hard and clearly about their goals and the direction that they want to give others".

- 6 Words and Phrases You Should Immediately Ban from Your Vocabulary

Media contact name : Ute Frey

Media office Phone : +15106420342

Media email : frey@haas.berkeley.edu

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