David Odde is the Medtronic Professor of Engineering in Medicine at the University of Minnesota. Trained as a chemical engineer at the University of Minnesota and Rutgers University, Odde joined the newly created Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Minnesota in 1999 where he is a professor and Associate Director for Strategic Research Initiatives in the Institute for Engineering in Medicine. 
In his research, Odde’s group builds computer models of cellular and molecular self-assembly and force-generation-dissipation dynamics, and tests the models experimentally using digital microscopic imaging of living cells ex vivo and in engineered microenvironments. His group seeks to bring an engineering approach that uses physics-based modeling and analysis to understand, predict, and control disease outcomes (oddelab.umn.edu). Dr. Odde is an elected Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES), the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering (IAMBE), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and is the Director of the Physical Sciences in Oncology Center at the University of Minnesota (psoc.umn.edu), which is focused on modeling the mechanics of cancer cell migration in biologically relevant contexts. 

Dr. Odde is a featured speaker in ASME's VisualizeMED virtual conference, April 14-15.


Title

Cited By

Year

Traction dynamics of filopodia on compliant substrates

655

2008

Laser‐guided direct writing of living cells

317

2000

Laser-guided direct writing for applications in biotechnology

289

1999

Laser‐guided direct writing for three‐dimensional tissue engineering

268

2005

Mechanochemical model of microtubule structure and self-assembly kinetics

242

2005

Estimates of lateral and longitudinal bond energies within the microtubule lattice

230

2002

Potential for control of signaling pathways via cell size and shape

215

2006

Rapid microtubule self-assembly kinetics

193

2011

Stable kinetochore-microtubule attachment constrains centromere positioning in metaphase

185

2004

Microtubule assembly dynamics at the nanoscale

176

2007

Chromosome congression by Kinesin-5 motor-mediated disassembly of longer kinetochore microtubules

174

2008

Rapid dynamics of the microtubule binding of ensconsin in vivo

161

2001

Microtubule bending and breaking in living fibroblast cells

150

1999

Tension-dependent regulation of microtubule dynamics at kinetochores can explain metaphase congression in yeast

142

2005

Kinetics of microtubule catastrophe assessed by probabilistic analysis

131

1995

Determinants of maximal force transmission in a motor-clutch model of cell traction in a compliant microenvironment

124

2013

Laser-guided manipulation of non-atomic particles

124

2004

Micropatterning of living cells by laser-guided direct writing: application to fabrication of hepatic–endothelial sinusoid-like structures

117

2006

Regulation of the MEX-5 gradient by a spatially segregated kinase/phosphatase cycle

116

2011

Tensile force-dependent neurite elicitation via anti-β1 integrin antibody-coated magnetic beads

115

2003

Leveraging Modeling and Simulation in Medicine at VisualizeMED

ASME’s VisualizeMED: Modeling and Simulation in Medicine will take place on April 14-15, 2021. This two-day virtual event is enabling the transformation of modeling and simulation in medicine by bringing together industry experts of technology and masters of technique who are effectively implementing it with the goal to increase the application and adoption on a global scale.
09-Mar-2021 12:30:48 PM EST

"Modeling and simulation [...] can identify the drug treatments that are less likely to be effective and the ones that are more likely to be effective".

- https://www.newswise.com/coronavirus/fast-tracking-clinical-trials-vaccine-delivery-and-personal-protective-equipment-through-engineering-live-virtual-event-for-march-11-3pm-et/?article_id=747245

"It would by itself potentially cut costs in half and if we could go further and be more iterative in how we develop therapies and predict in advance and start to track failures that are happening early in clinical trials and could pull the plug on them or redirect [them]".

- https://www.newswise.com/coronavirus/fast-tracking-clinical-trials-vaccine-delivery-and-personal-protective-equipment-through-engineering-live-virtual-event-for-march-11-3pm-et/?article_id=747245

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