Dr. Brent Goldfarb is an Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship in the M&O Department at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business. Goldfarb's research focuses on how the production and exchange of technology differs from more traditional economic goods, with a focus on the implications on the role of startups in the economy. He focuses on such questions as how do markets and employer policies affect incentives to discover new commercially valuable technologies and when is it best to commercialize them through new technology-based firms? Why do radical technologies appear to be the domain of startups? And how big was the dot.com boom? Copies of Dr. Goldfarb's publications and working papers have been downloaded over 1200 times.

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Cited By

Year

Bottom-up versus top-down policies towards the commercialization of university intellectual property

728

2003

Form or substance: the role of business plans in venture capital decision making

270

2009

The effect of government contracting on academic research: Does the source of funding affect scientific output?

200

2008

Appropriability and commercialization: Evidence from MIT inventions

146

2008

Was there too little entry during the Dot Com Era?

127

2007

Affect and the framing effect within individuals over time: Risk taking in a dynamic investment simulation

125

2010

Are angels different? An analysis of early venture financing

101

2013

Scientific apophenia in strategic management research: Significance tests & mistaken inference

77

2016

Diffusion of general-purpose technologies: understanding patterns in the electrification of US Manufacturing 1880–1930

65

2005

Scholarship and inventive activity in the university: complements or substitutes?

43

2009

Inventing the entrepreneurial university

32

2004

Optimal inertia: when organizations should

29

2006

Demand vs. supply driven innovations: US and Swedish experiences in academic entrepreneurship

25

2001

Searching for ghosts: business survival, unmeasured entrepreneurial activity and private equity investment in the dot-com era

24

2005

Small ideas, big ideas, bad ideas, good ideas:'get big fast'and dot com venture creation

17

2006

Entrepreneurial team formation

13

2020

Federal funding and the rate and direction of inventive activity

13

2018

Bubbles and crashes: The boom and bust of technological innovation

9

2019

Finance of new industries

9

2012

The origins of firm strategy: Learning by economic experimentation and strategic pivots in the early automobile industry

4

2020

The Most Successful Startups Mix Friendships and Business to Build Teams, Research Finds

New research in the Academy of Management Journal shows startups can foster team dynamics, fundraising and productivity, and maximize profit earnings through a hybrid formation strategy wherein founders both like each other due to shared values/experiences and have proper complementary skills/capabilities.
20-Sep-2021 01:00:29 PM EDT

Maryland Smith-Led Research Draws Inaugural Panmure House Prize

Maryland Smith’s Rachelle Sampson is the inaugural recipient of The Panmure House Prize, an annual award of $75,000 to emerging leaders in academia who are planning to produce outstanding research on the long-term funding of innovation.
19-Aug-2021 06:05:47 PM EDT

Maryland Smith Experts Weigh Bitcoin’s Viability as a Currency and Asset

With Bitcoin’s recent hot streak, finance expert David Kass and “Bubbles and Crashes” co-author Brent Goldfarb, both professors at Maryland Smith, share their views on the cryptocurrency’s viability as a market asset and currency for trade.
04-Mar-2021 02:10:46 PM EST

Bubbles and Crashes Author: Investors Can Learn from Luckin Coffee Plunge

Successful entrepreneurs are good storytellers. But sometimes the story is more fiction than nonfiction. Maryland Smith expert Brent Goldfarb explains the evolution and implications of Luckin Coffee’s fictionalized narrative.
03-Apr-2020 08:05:02 PM EDT

"It is extraordinarily difficult to change these sorts of conventions without some sort of government coercion, and even then, it is hard," Goldfarb said. "Just as the United States was unable to shift to the metric system, I see little chance that we'd change all our calendars, computer programs, and intuitive thinking to get rid of leap years and have a constant calendar."

- Forget leap days, start every year on a Monday - professors propose new calendar

"This is a win for Uber," said Brent Goldfarb, academic director at the Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship at the University of Maryland, College Park. "Putting in front of them an extra regulatory hoop or two to jump through isn't going to restrain them much. The basic model is approved."

- Uber, Lyft secure future in Maryland with passage of ride-share law

"Just as the United States was unable to shift to the metric system, I see little chance that we'd all change our calendars, computer programs and intuitive thinking to get rid of leap years and have a constant calendar," he told the paper.

- Tired of Leap Day? Wish Christmas was always on a Monday? Get on board with the permanent calendar

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