Christopher G. Myers, PhD is an associate professor in Management and Organization and the founding Faculty Director of the Center for Innovative Leadership at the Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School. He also holds a joint faculty appointment in the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine (Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine) and core faculty appointments in the Hopkins Business of Health Initiative and Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety & Quality.

His research examines learning, leadership development, and innovation in organizations, specifically analyzing how people learn vicariously from others’ knowledge and experience at work. He focuses on studying health care organizations and other knowledge-intensive work settings. His work has been published in premier academic journals in the fields of management, organizational psychology, medicine, and health care, as well as in leading practice-oriented publications and editorials. Before joining Johns Hopkins, he was an assistant professor of organizational behavior at the Harvard Business School. 

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Cited By

Year

Learning Agility: In Search of Conceptual Clarity and Theoretical Grounding

251

2012

Leadership Development: A Review and Agenda for Future Research

176

2014

Why Companies are Becoming B Corporations

98

2016

The Relational Nature of Leadership Identity Construction: How and When it Influences Perceived Leadership and Decision-making

90

2015

Coactive Vicarious Learning: Toward a Relational Theory of Vicarious Learning in Organizations

86

2018

Health Care Providers Can Use Design Thinking to Improve Patient Experiences

45

2017

Is Your Company Encouraging Employees to Share What They Know?

43

2015

Making Management Skills a Core Component of Medical Education

34

2017

Cooperation in Multicultural Negotiations: How the Cultures of People With Low and High Power Interact

33

2016

Social Media as a Platform for Surgical Learning: Use and Engagement Patterns Among Robotic Surgeons.

27

2018

The Next Wave of Hospital Innovation to Make Patients Safer

24

2016

The Hierarchical Face: Higher Rankings Lead to Less Cooperative Looks

21

2012

Resilience in action: Leading for resilience in response to COVID-19

20

2020

Learning Agility: Many Questions, a Few Answers, and a Path Forward

19

2012

Excising the “surgeon ego” to accelerate progress in the culture of surgery

15

2018

Covid-19 Created an Elective Surgery Backlog. How Can Hospitals Get Back on Track?

11

2020

"My Bad!": How Internal Attribution and Ambiguity of Responsibility Affect Learning from Failure

11

2014

Gender Bias in Collaborative Medical Decision Making: Emergent Evidence.

10

2020

The Conceptual and Empirical Value of a Positive Lens: An Invitation to Organizational Scholars to Develop Novel Research Questions

9

2021

Performance Benefits of Reciprocal Vicarious Learning in Teams

9

2021

Seeing Others’ Big Triumphs, We May Feel More Motivated than Usual to Succeed

When we perceive that a peer’s accomplishment has risen above the usual standard of “good work” and can be rated an “exceptional” success, our motivation to learn is enhanced, according to a new study in Academy of Management Discoveries.
05-May-2021 09:50:04 AM EDT

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