Jeff   Freedman, PhD

Jeff Freedman, PhD

University at Albany, State University of New York

Research Faculty, Atmospheric Sciences Research Center

Expertise: Atmospheric SciencesMeteorologyRenewable Energy

Research Interests
As part of the Boundary Layer Meteorology and Renewable Energy Groups at ASRC, my main research focus is on renewable energy and atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) processes. This includes work on improving wind and solar power production forecasting, outage prediction modeling applications, developing instrumentation and improving modeling approaches for offshore wind energy, and using ASRC modeling and observational assets to better understand weather and climate influences on our renewable energy resource. A principal tool for my observational work is a Leosphere Windcube 100S scanning LiDAR. Of great value for my research is continuing collaboration with colleagues at ASRC, the New York State Mesonet, the Center of Excellence for Weather and Climate Analytics, and working with a very talented group of graduate students.

My previous work in the private sector (with Atmospheric Information Services and Envirolaw, companies I founded, and AWS Truepower, as Lead Research Scientist) included serving as a lead Principal Investigator for the first Wind Forecasting Improvement Project (WFIP), a three-year Department of Energy (DOE)/National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) study to demonstrate the value of additional atmospheric observations and model enhancements on wind energy production forecasts, the development of the Solar Wind Integrated Forecast Tool (SWIFT), a state-of-the-art forecasting service for Hawaii´s electric utilities, and a LiDAR-based study of the 3D wind field over Cranberry Lake in New York’s Adirondack Mountains, and developing an early roadmap for the legal and regulatory review of offshore wind energy projects in US coastal waters.

“In the U.S., a large percentage of people of color and other marginalized groups tend to live in poorer urban areas with limited access to air conditioning or clean air. Climate change is making these problems worse.”

Over the ocean, we have no such observations, so the models have to guess,” Freedman said, referring to satellite observations weather models currently use. “The more accurate you are in the forecast, the more confident in the energy you can generate.”

“There’s a perception in the public that natural gas is more benign than, let’s say, coal or oil."

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