Kevin  Van Den Wymelenberg, PhD

Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg, PhD

University of Oregon

Interim Director, School of Architecture & Environment; Professor Institute for Health in the Built Environment (IHBE) Director, Energy Studies Building Lab (ESBL) Director, Biology of the Built Environment (BioBE) Codirector

Expertise: indoor microbiologyIndoor Air QualityAir QualityEnergy EfficiencyCOVID -19

Dr. Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg studies indoor air quality and microbiology and energy efficiency. A professor of architecture at the University of Oregon, he founded the Institute for Health in the Built Environment and directs Biology and the Built Environment Center and the Energy Studies in Buildings Laboratory. His work seeks to facilitate integration amongst a broad network of researchers and practitioners on issues concerning health, comfort, and sustainability in the human ecosystem in order to support human, community and plentary health. He has a PhD in the Built Environment from the University of Washington. He has consulted on several hundred new construction and major renovation projects with architects and engineers and several of these projects have been recognized with AIA’s Committee on the Environment Top 10 Awards. He has been invited to speak at the National Academy of Sciences Engineering and Medicine, the US House of Representatives, and many scientific and design conferences.  He has authored over 100 articles related to building design, operation and performance.  He has completed secured over $15M in funded research on topics of energy and indoor environmental quality for organizations such as the National Science Foundation, United States Environment Protection Agency, United States Department of Energy, United States Department of Agriculture, The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance and several others. 

“Intentional humidification is not often incorporated into indoor spaces due to cost or maintenance concerns, but should be considered since it can support increased viral particle deposition as shown in this study, as well as support our bodies’ natural

A series of studies — performed in an enclosed box, a 9-by-14-foot room and the hospital rooms of Covid-19 patients — suggested that the AerosolSense sampler could capture the coronavirus even when present at low levels, said Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg, wh

“I really believe our building operators of the future and our designers will be thinking about how to shape the microbiome,” he says.

"We've designed buildings for 100-year floods," he says. "Now we have to learn to design for the 100-year flu."

If schools have to pick one area to concentrate on, Van Den Wymelenberg said, it should be aerosol transmission. “Surfaces are easier to understand and less scary” than containing airborne particles. “It’s a much more complicated problem, but it is solvab


Title

Cited By

Year

2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic: built environment considerations to reduce transmission

297

2020

Revealing occupancy patterns in an office building through the use of occupancy sensor data

262

2013

Patterns of occupant interaction with window blinds: A literature review

212

2012

A critical investigation of common lighting design metrics for predicting human visual comfort in offices with daylight

190

2014

The effect of luminance distribution patterns on occupant preference in a daylit office environment

157

2010

Oversizing of HVAC system: Signatures and penalties

99

2011

Evaluating a new suite of luminance-based design metrics for predicting human visual comfort in offices with daylight

74

2016

Understanding controls, behaviors and satisfaction in the daylit perimeter office: A daylight design case study

73

2012

Visual comfort, discomfort glare, and occupant fenestration control: developing a research agenda

59

2014

Daylight exposure modulates bacterial communities associated with household dust

58

2018

Building upon current knowledge and techniques of indoor microbiology to construct the next era of theory into microorganisms, health, and the built environment

52

2020

Assessment of human exposure to triclocarban, triclosan and five parabens in US indoor dust using dispersive solid phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography tandem …

52

2018

Cleanliness in context: reconciling hygiene with a modern microbial perspective

45

2017

Evaluating human visual preference and performance in an office environment using luminance-based metrics

41

2012

Antimicrobial chemicals associate with microbial function and antibiotic resistance indoors

40

2018

Accurate measurement of daylit interior scenes using high dynamic range photography

40

2016

Identification of SARS‐CoV‐2 RNA in healthcare heating, ventilation, and air conditioning units

35

2021

Improving the accuracy of measurements in daylit interior scenes using high dynamic range photography

34

2016

Facing the challenges of integrated design and project delivery

33

2008

Towards an integrated framework for predicting visual comfort conditions from luminance-based metrics in perimeter daylit spaces

31

2015

Ventilation, humidity are key to limiting virus spread, study says

The researchers found that increased viral load in nasal samples was associated with higher viral loads in the air and on surfaces in the room. In addition, increased filtration and ventilation significantly reduced viral loads in the air and on surfaces. And higher relative humidity reduced viral particles in the air by half, while leading to more viral particles on surfaces, where they are less likely to spread disease.
16-Feb-2022 01:25:44 PM EST

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