Lewis  Nelson, MD

Lewis Nelson, MD

Rutgers New Jersey Medical School

Chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine and Chief of the Division of Medical Toxicology

Expertise: Emergency MedicineToxicologyHealthAddiction MedicineOpioid

Lewis S. Nelson, MD is Professor and Chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine and Chief of the Division of Medical Toxicology at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School; Chief of Service for the Emergency Department at University Hospital of Newark, and Senior Consultant to the New Jersey Poison Information & Education System. Dr. Nelson is board certified in emergency medicine, medical toxicology, and addiction medicine. His areas of interest include non-opioid pain relief strategies, opioid use, addiction and withdrawal management, and health policy focused on issues related to medication safety and substance use. He is the senior editor of the textbook “Goldfrank’s Toxicologic Emergencies", active on several professional boards, and a long-standing consultant to CDC, DHS, and FDA regarding opioid use, terrorism, and medical safety respectively.

Lewis Nelson, chief of the Division of Medical Toxicology for Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, said that amount indicates enough to cause a fatal overdose in someone taking the drug for the first time.

“I think it’s very difficult to tease out cause of death and overdose,” said Dr. Lewis Nelson of Rutgers University. “Overall, I think the quality of evidence was fairly poor.”

GHB “has serious safety concerns, both in terms of its abuse liability and its addictive potential,” said Dr. Lewis S. Nelson, the director of medical toxicology at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School.


Title

Cited By

Year

Goldfrank's toxicologic emergencies

984

2002

The toxicology of bath salts: a review of synthetic cathinones

719

2012

Goldfrank's toxicologic emergencies

399

2018

Body packing—the internal concealment of illicit drugs

359

2003

Adverse events associated with ketamine for procedural sedation in adults

311

2008

Adverse events associated with dietary supplements: an observational study

299

2003

Severe toxicity following synthetic cannabinoid ingestion

236

2011

Goldfrank's Toxicologic Emergency

236

2006

Clinical policy: critical issues in the prescribing of opioids for adult patients in the emergency department

217

2012

Prescription drug abuse: insight into the epidemic

213

2010

Goldfrank's Toxicologic Emergencies, (ebook)

211

2014

Transdermal fentanyl: pharmacology and toxicology

197

2009

Handbook of poisonous and injurious plants

186

2007

A strategy of escalating doses of benzodiazepines and phenobarbital administration reduces the need for mechanical ventilation in delirium tremens

173

2007

The use of analgesics in patients with acute abdominal pain

167

1997

Cocaine-associated myocardial infarction: mortality and complications

167

1995

Addressing the opioid epidemic

164

2015

Acute cyanide toxicity: mechanisms and manifestations

157

2006

Tricyclic antidepressant poisoning: an evidence-based consensus guideline for out-of-hospital management

154

2007

Use of hemodialysis and hemoperfusion in poisoned patients

149

2008

More and More Young Children Are Accidentally Ingesting Cannabis Edibles

For the fourth year in a row the NJ Poison Control Center has seen an increase in calls concerning children who accidentally consumed cannabis (marijuana, THC) edibles. Last year (2021), the NJ Poison Control Center assisted in the medical treatment of more than 150 children who were accidentally exposed to cannabis edibles — nearly 100 children 5-years-old and younger; more than 55 children between the ages of 6 and 12.
27-Apr-2022 11:05:45 AM EDT

Why are Fentanyl Deaths Rising?

A Rutgers expert discusses the rise of fentanyl deaths nationwide—and how they can be averted
28-Feb-2022 08:05:16 AM EST

Reports of fentanyl-related passive toxicity has led to the release of hyperbolic warnings and burdensome recommendations by Drug Enforcement Administration, including the use of extensive personal protective equipment, such as gloves, paper coveralls, eye protection, and even particulate respirators. We believe that such responses to passive casualties from fentanyl are excessive and may actually interfere with the ability of first responders and others to do their jobs.

- ‘Passive’ fentanyl exposure: more myth than reality

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