Victor  Pickard, PhD

Victor Pickard, PhD

University of Pennsylvania, Annenberg School for Communication

People Faculty Victor Pickard, Ph.D. Victor Pickard, Ph.D. C. Edwin Baker Professor of Media Policy and Political Economy

Expertise: Journalismpublic mediaFCCMedia PolicyPolitical EconomyMedia activismJournalism and DemocracyNet Neutrality

Victor Pickard is a Professor of Media Policy and Political Economy at the Annenberg School for Communication. Previously he taught at NYU and the University of Virginia and has held visiting appointments at Cornell, Goldsmiths, and LSE. He also worked on media policy in Washington, D.C. as a Senior Research Fellow at the media reform organization Free Press and the think tank New America, and as a Policy Fellow for Congresswoman Diane Watson.

Pickard has published over 100 articles, essays, and book chapters in leading scholarly journals and anthologies. He also has authored or edited six books, including the award-winning Democracy Without Journalism?: Confronting the Misinformation Society (Oxford University Press, 2020) and America’s Battle for Media Democracy: The Triumph of Corporate Libertarianism and the Future of Media Reform (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Other books include After Net Neutrality: A New Deal for the Digital Age (with David Berman; Yale University Press, 2019), Will the Last Reporter Please Turn out the Lights (with Robert McChesney; The New Press, 2011), The Future of Internet Policy (with Peter Decherney; Routledge, 2016), and Media Activism in the Digital Age (with Guobin Yang; Routledge, 2017).

Pickard has also co-authored three major reports. In 2009, he was the lead author of the first comprehensive report on the American journalism crisis, "Saving the News: Toward a National Journalism Strategy" (published by Free Press as part of the book Changing Media: Public Interest Policies for the Digital Age). In 2017, he co-authored the major report “Essential Principles for Contemporary Media and Communications Policymaking” (with Robert Picard; published by the Reuters Institute, University of Oxford). In 2018, he co-authored the report “The Media Democracy Agenda: The Strategy and Legacy of FCC Commissioner Michael Copps” (with Pawel Popiel; published by the Benton Foundation).

Pickard sits on the editorial board of 12 major communication journals and book series, and he has received numerous article and book awards, including the Frank Luther Mott/Kappa Tau Alpha Journalism book award, a James Tankard book award finalist, and the Harry W. Stonecipher Award for Distinguished Research on Media Law and Policy.

Pickard also maintains an active profile as a public scholar. He is a frequent commentator on public radio and he often speaks to the press about media-related issues. He has been interviewed about his research in leading news organizations such as NPR, the Washington Post, USA Today, and the New York Times. His op-eds and essays have appeared in venues like The Guardian, The Washington Post, Columbia Journalism Review, The Seattle Times, the Huffington Post, The Philadelphia Inquirer, Harvard Business Review, Jacobin, The Nation, and The Atlantic. He has delivered lectures and keynote addresses on campuses around the world. He is a board member for Free Press and he frequently collaborates with activists, policymakers, journalists, and community groups focused on media reform. Since 2012, he has co-directed the annual Consortium on Media Policy Studies (COMPASS) program in Washington D.C. With Sarah J. Jackson and Todd Wolfson, he co-directs the Media, Inequality & Change (MIC) Center.

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Cited By

Year

Will the last reporter please turn out the lights: The collapse of journalism and what can be done to fix it

325

2011

America's battle for media democracy: The triumph of corporate libertarianism and the future of media reform

286

2015

Managing the public sphere: Journalistic construction of the great globalization debate

275

2004

Assessing the radical democracy of Indymedia: Discursive, technical, and institutional constructions

229

2006

United yet autonomous: Indymedia and the struggle to sustain a radical democratic network

216

2006

No shades of gray: The binary discourse of George W. Bush and an echoing press

180

2004

Neoliberal visions and revisions in global communications policy from NWICO to WSIS

124

2007

Democracy without journalism?: Confronting the misinformation society

119

2020

Salvation or folly? The promises and perils of digital paywalls

100

2014

Cooptation and cooperation: institutional exemplars of democratic internet technology

87

2008

Can government support the press? Historicizing and internationalizing a policy approach to the journalism crisis

78

2011

Essential principles for contemporary media and communications policymaking

70

2017

Media failures in the age of Trump

69

2017

The battle over the FCC Blue Book: determining the role of broadcast media in a democratic society, 1945-8

61

2011

Saving the news: Toward a national journalism strategy

61

2009

What is bottom-up about global internet governance?

59

2005

“Whether the giants should be slain or persuaded to be good”: Revisiting the Hutchins Commission and the role of media in a democratic society

57

2010

Digital feudalism: Enclosures and erasures from digital rights management to the digital divide

56

2011

Social democracy or corporate libertarianism? Conflicting media policy narratives in the wake of market failure

54

2013

Transcending net neutrality: Ten steps toward an open Internet

53

2008

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