Yphtach (Yph) Lelkes is an Associate Professor at the Annenberg School for Communication. He studies public opinion, political psychology, and political communication.

His interests lie at the intersection of political communication, public opinion, and political psychology. In the broadest sense, he is interested in the antecedents, structure, and consequences of citizens’ political attitudes. He has focused on three, often overlapping, research questions: (1) What are the roots, structure, and consequences of affective polarization? (2) What is the impact of changes to the information environment on political attitudes? (3) What are the psychological underpinning and structure of political belief systems?

His work appears in top field journals in Communication (Journal of Communication, Journal of Computer Mediated Communication), Political Science (American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics), Psychology (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology), as well as general interest journals (PNAS, Nature Human Behavior). 

He takes a problem- rather than methods-based approach to social science. As such, he regularly employ traditional methods (such as surveys, lab & field experiments, and quasi-experiments) as well as more computationally intensive methods (using, e.g., geographic data, huge administrative datasets, and automated text analysis).

He is also the director of the Democracy and Information Group, where he explores these and related issues.

Before joining the University of Pennsylvania, he was faculty at the Amsterdam School of Communication. He received his Ph.D. from Stanford University.

Lelkes is a faculty affiliate at the Institute for the Study of Citizens and Politics and a fellow at the Amsterdam School of Communication Research. He also holds a secondary appointment in the Penn Political Science department.

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Cited By

Year

Affect, not ideologya social identity perspective on polarization

1784

2012

The origins and consequences of affective polarization in the United States

746

2019

The hostile audience: The effect of access to broadband internet on partisan affect

293

2017

Implicit and explicit prejudice in the 2008 American presidential election

265

2010

More than Ideology: Conservative–Liberal Identity and Receptivity to Political Cues

251

2010

Mass polarization: Manifestations and measurements

247

2016

Do needs for security and certainty predict cultural and economic conservatism? A cross-national analysis.

202

2014

Determinants of turnout and candidate choice in the 2008 US presidential election: Illuminating the impact of racial prejudice and other considerations

171

2009

Complete Anonymity Compromises the Accuracy of Self-Reports

160

2012

The association of religiosity and political conservatism: The role of political engagement

141

2012

The limits of partisan prejudice

120

2017

Are cultural and economic conservatism positively correlated? A large-scale cross-national test

117

2019

Selling ourselves short? How abbreviated measures of personality change the way we think about personality and politics

91

2018

Brevity is the soul of Twitter: The constraint affordance and political discussion

59

2019

Affective polarization and ideological sorting: a reciprocal, albeit weak, relationship

55

2018

Understanding partisan cue receptivity: Tests of predictions from the bounded rationality and expressive utility perspectives

43

2020

Policy over party: comparing the effects of candidate ideology and party on affective polarization

42

2021

Ideological Asymmetries in the American Party System: The Power of Ideology in Partisan Politics

41

2016

How Christians reconcile their personal political views and the teachings of their faith: Projection as a means of dissonance reduction

41

2012

Projecting confidence: How the probabilistic horse race confuses and demobilizes the public

40

2020

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