Enhancing the Sensing Capabilities of Diamonds with Quantum Properties

When a nitrogen atom is next to the space vacated by a carbon atom, it forms what is called a nitrogen-vacancy center. Now, researchers have shown how they can create more NV centers, which makes sensing magnetic fields easier, using a relatively simple method that can be done in many labs. They describe their results this week in Applied Physics Letters.

PPPL Physicist Francesca Poli Named ITER Scientist Fellow

Article describes new ITER Scientist Fellow.

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Detecting Cosmic Rays from a Galaxy Far, Far Away

Where do cosmic rays come from? Solving a 50-year old mystery, a collaboration of researchers has discovered it's much farther than the Milky Way.

Comet or Asteroid? Hubble Discovers that a Unique Object is a Binary

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope helped an international team of astronomers find that an unusual object in the asteroid belt is, in fact, two asteroids orbiting each other that have comet-like features. These include a bright halo of material, called a coma, and a long tail of dust.

Laser-Free Method of Ion Cooling Has Range of Potential Uses

Prof. Daniel Zajfman's universal ion trap cools to a tenth of a degree above absolute zero. The new method does not depend on the type or the weight of the ion and, thus, might be used to investigate the properties of large biological molecules or nanoparticles, among other things.

Mathematicians Ask: What's in a Ripple?

When a fluid or a gas experiences a sudden disturbance, it often gives rise to a phenomenon known as an undular bore, consisting of rapid oscillations that spread. But how to describe what transpires? New mathematics research brings us closer to finding an answer.

A TOAST for Next Generation CMB Experiments

Computational cosmologists at Berkeley Lab recently achieved a critical milestone in preparation for upcoming CMB experiments: scaling their data simulation and reduction framework TOAST to run on all 658,784 Intel Knights Landing Xeon Phi processor cores on NERSC's Cori supercomputer. The team also implemented a new TOAST module to simulate the noise introduced when ground-based telescopes look at the CMB through the atmosphere.

$20 Million Statewide Grant to Further Plasma Research, Synthesize Novel Materials and Improve Technologies in Manufacturing Industries

UAB will be a fundamental player in the Alabama jurisdiction of the program, which has just five awardees, with primary goals of improving scientific research and building workforce capacity.

Fluorescence Microscopy on a Chip -- No Lenses Required

Fluorescence microscopy gives researchers power to illuminate the tiniest structures and capture the real-time activities of cells by tagging biological molecules with a rainbow of fluorescent dyes. Researchers have developed a system that enables scientists to rapidly image fluorescent cells grown inside the chip using a CMOS image sensor, the same technology found in the camera of a smartphone. The new system, described this week in AIP Advances, has numerous potential uses in biomedical research.

Running Roaches, Flapping Moths Create a New Physics of Organisms

Sand-swimming lizards, slithering robotic snakes, dusk-flying moths and running roaches all have one thing in common: They're increasingly being studied by physicists interested in understanding the shared strategies these creatures have developed to overcome the challenges of moving though their environments.

Optical and Electrical Bistability Study Sheds Light on Next-Gen High Speed Data Transfer

Today, electrical bistable devices are the foundation of digital electronics, but the bandwidth of these electronic computers is limited by the signal delay of time constants important to electronic logic operations. In an attempt to mitigate these problems, scientists have considered the development of an optical digital computer. This week, in the Journal of Applied Physics, researchers present their findings regarding the optical and electrical bistability of a single transistor operated at room temperature.

25 Years After the Last U.S. Nuclear Test

25 years ago today, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory conducted its last nuclear test. With the end of that era came the birth of stockpile stewardship and a new generation of science-focused weapon physicists.

$1.6 Million NSF Grant to Advance Understanding of 'Amorphous' Materials

A physics professor at Missouri University of Science and Technology will lead a four-year effort to spur research, development and commercial adoption of a new class of oxide semiconductors that outperform silicon-based transistors and could lead to new uses for flexible displays.

ASTRO Awards Early-Career Research Grants to Physician-Scientists

The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) is awarding $275,000 in research awards to four early-career scientists as part of the Society's efforts to retain and foster the intellectual research talent currently entering the field of radiation oncology.

New Evidence for Small, Short-Lived Drops of Early Universe Quark-Gluon Plasma?

UPTON, NY--Particles emerging from even the lowest energy collisions of small deuterons with large heavy nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)--a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility for nuclear physics research at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory--exhibit behavior scientists associate with the formation of a soup of quarks and gluons, the fundamental building blocks of nearly all visible matter.

Sensing with a Twist: A New Kind of Optical Nanosensor Uses Torque for Signal Processing

An international group of researchers have put a literal twist on this challenge, demonstrating a new nanoscale optomechanical resonator that can detect torsional motion at near state-of-the-art sensitivity. Their resonator, into which they couple light, also demonstrates torsional frequency mixing, a novel ability to impact optical energies using mechanical motions.

Boise State Biophysicist Awarded Grant to Study How the Genome Works

A biophysicist has been awarded a three-year National Institutes of Health Academic Research Enhancement Award to study and help explain the basic functions of the human genome.

WVU Physicists Chase New 'Wave' of Condensed Matter Research

Just one year after arriving at West Virginia University, physicist Lian Li is taking physics research to new frontiers. In collaboration with fellow WVU condensed matter experiment expert Cheng Cen, they are breaking the rules of classical physics in search of a solution to making computers faster than ever.

Getting to the Point (Mutations) in Re-Engineering Biofuel-Producing Bacterial Enzymes

Helping bacteria become more efficient when breaking down fibrous plant waste into biofuel could result in more affordable biofuels for our gas tanks and sustainable products such as bioplastics. One way to achieve this goal is to re-engineer the bacterial enzyme complexes, called cellulosomes, which serve as catalysts in the degradation process. Researchers discuss one method to produce cellulosomes in The Journal of Chemical Physics.

A One-of-a-Kind Star Found to Change Over Decades

Researchers at the University of Notre Dame recently found new evidence that lends support to an existing theory of how the unusual star emits energy.

Doctors Can Now Predict the Severity of Your Disease by Measuring Molecules

The simple new technique could offer vastly superior predictions of disease severity in a huge range of conditions with a genetic component, including Alzheimer's, autism, cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, schizophrenia and depression.

Solar Flares, Boron on Mars, Mapping the Universe, and More in the Space News Source

The latest in space and astronomy in the Space News Source

Physicists Propose New Way to Stabilize Next-Generation Fusion Plasmas

Recent experiments conducted on the DIII-D National Fusion Facility suggest that up to 40 percent of high-energy particles are lost during tokamak fusion reactions because of Alfven waves.

Hewlett Packard's Suhas Kumar Wins 2017 Klein Award

Suhas Kumar, a postdoctoral researcher at Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE), wants to develop next-generation information storage devices and better computers. His particular interest is a new type of electronic device, called a memristor, that could make future computer memories faster, more durable and more energy efficient than today's flash memory.