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    Study shows a much cheaper catalyst can generate hydrogen in a commercial device

    Study shows a much cheaper catalyst can generate hydrogen in a commercial device

    SLAC and Stanford researchers have shown for the first time that a cheap catalyst can split water and generate hydrogen gas for hours on end in the harsh environment of a commercial electrolyzer - a step toward large-scale hydrogen production for fuel, fertilizer and industry.

    Unlocking the Biochemical Treasure Chest Within Microbes

    Unlocking the Biochemical Treasure Chest Within Microbes

    An international team of scientists lead by the Joint Genome Institute has developed a genetic engineering tool that makes producing and analyzing microbial secondary metabolites - the basis for many important agricultural, industrial, and medical products - much easier than before, and could even lead to breakthroughs in biomanufacturing.

    Scientists Pinpoint Cause of Harmful Dendrites and Whiskers in Lithium Batteries

    Scientists Pinpoint Cause of Harmful Dendrites and Whiskers in Lithium Batteries

    Scientists have uncovered a root cause of the growth of needle-like structures--known as dendrites and whiskers--that plague lithium batteries, sometimes causing a short circuit or failure. The defects are a major factor holding back the batteries from broader widespread use and further improvement.

    Argonne and University of Illinois to form hydrogen fuel cell coalition

    Argonne and University of Illinois to form hydrogen fuel cell coalition

    Argonne and University of Illinois announce intent to form the Midwest Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Coalition.

    Six Degrees of Nuclear Separation

    Six Degrees of Nuclear Separation

    For the first time, Argonne scientists have printed 3D parts that pave the way to recycling up to 97 percent of the waste produced by nuclear reactors. From left to right: Peter Kozak, Andrew Breshears, M Alex Brown, co-authors of a recent Scientific Reports article detailing their breakthrough. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)

    Shaping nanoparticles for improved quantum information technology

    Shaping nanoparticles for improved quantum information technology

    Argonne researchers find that semiconductor nanoparticles in the shape of rings have attractive properties for quantum networking and computation.

    Science Snapshots - Waste to fuel, moire superlattices, mining cellphones for energy data

    Science Snapshots - Waste to fuel, moire superlattices, mining cellphones for energy data

    Science Snapshots - Waste to fuel, moire superlattices, mining cellphones for energy data

    New Electrolyte Stops Rapid Performance Decline of Next-Generation Lithium Battery

    New Electrolyte Stops Rapid Performance Decline of Next-Generation Lithium Battery

    Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory have designed and tested a new electrolyte composition that could greatly accelerate the adoption of the next generation of lithium-ion batteries.

    Light My Fire: How to Startup Fusion Devices Every Time

    Light My Fire: How to Startup Fusion Devices Every Time

    Researchers have constructed a framework for starting and raising a fusion plasma to temperatures rivaling the sun in hundreds of milliseconds.

    Atomic-level Imaging Could Offer Roadmap to Metals with New Properties

    Atomic-level Imaging Could Offer Roadmap to Metals with New Properties

    A team of researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology has developed a new process that could help gain new insights into individual high-entropy alloys and help characterize their properties.

    Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, October 2019

    Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, October 2019

    ORNL story tips: Reaching the boiling point for HVACs; showcasing innovation for technology transfer; using neutrons to lend insight into human tissue; and heating the core in a fusion prototype experiment.

    Chromosome Connectors Take Center Stage for ORNL Scientists Studying Poplar

    Chromosome Connectors Take Center Stage for ORNL Scientists Studying Poplar

    An Oak Ridge National Laboratory team mapped the locations of centromeres in Populus trichocarpa (poplar), and a subsequent analysis on the Titan supercomputer showed that genetic variants in the DNA sequence at the centromere and the sequence of a protein structure this DNA wraps around show similar occurrence patterns.

    How long does memory last? For shape memory alloys, the longer the better

    How long does memory last? For shape memory alloys, the longer the better

    Ames Laboratory researchers heated shape memory alloys inside a transmission electron microscope (TEM), so that they could observe phase transitions in real time. The information could lead to more reliable SMAs for applications.

    Supercomputing, neutrons unite to unravel structures of intrinsically disordered protein

    Supercomputing, neutrons unite to unravel structures of intrinsically disordered protein

    Using the Titan supercomputer and the Spallation Neutron Source at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, scientists have created the most accurate 3D model yet of an intrinsically disordered protein, revealing the ensemble of its atomic-level structures.

    Argonne National Laboratory to Join ATOM to Transform Drug Discovery with Artificial Intelligence

    Argonne National Laboratory to Join ATOM to Transform Drug Discovery with Artificial Intelligence

    Argonne to become newest member of Accelerating Therapeutics for Opportunities in Medicine (ATOM) consortium.

    ORNL scientists shed light on microbial 'dark matter' with new approach

    ORNL scientists shed light on microbial 'dark matter' with new approach

    Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have demonstrated a way to isolate and grow targeted bacteria using genomic data, making strides toward resolving the grand challenge of uncultivated microbial "dark matter" in which the vast majority of microorganisms remain unstudied in the laboratory.

    Scientists finally find superconductivity in exactly the place they have been looking for decades

    Scientists finally find superconductivity in exactly the place they have been looking for decades

    SLAC and Stanford scientists prove a well-known model of material behavior applies to high-temperature superconductors, giving them a new tool for understanding how these weird materials conduct electricity with no loss.

    Shocking heat waves stabilize single atoms

    Shocking heat waves stabilize single atoms

    Single atom catalysts are highly desirable, but difficult to stabilize. Argonne scientists are part of a team that is using repeated high temperature shockwaves to synthesize high-stability and high-efficiency single atom catalysts.

    Researchers home in on extremely rare nuclear process

    Researchers home in on extremely rare nuclear process

    A hypothetical nuclear process known as neutrinoless double beta decay ought to be among the least likely events in the universe. Now the international EXO-200 collaboration, which includes researchers from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, has determined just how unlikely it is: In a given volume of a certain xenon isotope, it would take more than 35 trillion trillion years for half of its nuclei to decay through this process - an eternity compared to the age of the universe, which is "only" 13 billion years old.

    ORNL develops, deploys AI capabilities across research portfolio

    ORNL develops, deploys AI capabilities across research portfolio

    To accelerate promising artificial intelligence applications in diverse research fields, ORNL has established a labwide AI Initiative. This internal investment brings the lab's AI expertise, computing resources and user facilities together to facilitate analyses of massive datasets.

    Seeing sound: Scientists observe how acoustic interactions change materials at the atomic level

    Seeing sound: Scientists observe how acoustic interactions change materials at the atomic level

    By using sound waves, scientists have begun to explore fundamental stress behaviors in a crystalline material that could form the basis for quantum information technologies.

    Today's forecast: How to predict crucial plasma pressure in future fusion facilities

    Today's forecast: How to predict crucial plasma pressure in future fusion facilities

    Feature describes improved model for forecasting the crucial balance of pressure at the edge of a fusion plasma.

    Science Snapshots: messenger proteins, new TB drug, artificial photosynthesis

    Science Snapshots: messenger proteins, new TB drug, artificial photosynthesis

    Science Snapshots: messenger proteins, new TB drug, artificial photosynthesis

    Plastics, Fuels and Chemical Feedstocks From CO2? They're Working on It

    Plastics, Fuels and Chemical Feedstocks From CO2? They're Working on It

    Four SUNCAT scientists describe recent research results related to the quest to capture CO2 from the smokestacks of factories and power plants and use renewable energy to turn it into industrial feedstocks and fuels.

    Getting a look under the hood of topological insulators

    Getting a look under the hood of topological insulators

    Because of topological insulators' unique electronic properties and their potential use in spintronic devices and even conceivably as transistors for quantum computers, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory investigated the dynamics of the conducting surface electrons in these materials.