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    Rust never sleeps

    Rust never sleeps

    PNNL researchers have been able to observe in unprecedented detail how rust happens.

    Argonne Researchers Develop New Method to Reduce Quantum Noise

    Argonne Researchers Develop New Method to Reduce Quantum Noise

    New method for alleviating the effects of "noise" in quantum information systems addresses a challenge that scientists around the globe are working to meet in the race toward a new era of quantum technologies.

    Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, February 4, 2019

    Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, February 4, 2019

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory used machine learning to map vegetation in Alaskan tundra; ORNL taps machine learning to better predict home-to-work commuting; Univ of South Carolina investigates oxygen-reducing perovskites in fuel cells using ORNL neutrons; decades of data showed salt purity trends leading to inconsistent corrosion of alloys.

    New Approach Gets Better View of Carbon Deeper Underground

    New Approach Gets Better View of Carbon Deeper Underground

    Characterizing carbon stored in deeper sediments below soils is critical for understanding the stability and dynamics of Earth's carbon pool.

    CSI: Neutrinos Cast No Shadows

    CSI: Neutrinos Cast No Shadows

    New crime scene investigation technique offers a hard look at the traces that particles leave before fleeing the scene.

    Novel electron microscopy offers nanoscale, damage-free tracking of isotopes in amino acids

    Novel electron microscopy offers nanoscale, damage-free tracking of isotopes in amino acids

    Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory described in the journal Science the first use of an electron microscope to directly identify isotopes in amino acids at the nanoscale without damaging the samples, which could open a new pathway for deeper, more comprehensive studies of the basic building blocks of life.

    Superinsulators to Become Scientists' Quark Playgrounds

    Superinsulators to Become Scientists' Quark Playgrounds

    Scientists widely accept the existence of quarks, the elusive fundamental particles that make up protons and neutrons. But information about their properties is still lacking.

    ArgoNeuT Hits a Home Run with Measurements of Neutrinos in Liquid Argon

    ArgoNeuT Hits a Home Run with Measurements of Neutrinos in Liquid Argon

    Scientists developed a method to better distinguish the tracks that particles leave behind in liquid argon.

    Optimizing Electric Fields Yields Better Catalysts

    Optimizing Electric Fields Yields Better Catalysts

    A careful consideration of electric fields could lead to faster industrial processes that use less energy and release less waste.

    Revealed: Structure of Proton in Liquid Water

    Revealed: Structure of Proton in Liquid Water

    Findings could rewrite textbooks about molecular structure for solvent ubiquitous in chemistry and biology.

    Community Matters When Using Algae to Produce Energy

    Community Matters When Using Algae to Produce Energy

    Algae that turn carbon dioxide into fuel feedstock are enhanced by surrounding bacteria.

    New Probe for the Secrets of Complex Interfaces

    New Probe for the Secrets of Complex Interfaces

    Element-selective method reveals interfacial properties of materials used for water purification, catalysis, energy conversion, and more.

    How to Escape a Black Hole: Simulations Provide New Clues to What's Driving Powerful Plasma Jets

    How to Escape a Black Hole: Simulations Provide New Clues to What's Driving Powerful Plasma Jets

    New simulations led by researchers working at the Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have combined decades-old theories to provide new insight about the driving mechanisms in plasma jets that allows them to steal energy from black holes' powerful gravitational fields and propel it far from their gaping mouths.

    Getting To Know the Microbes that Drive Climate Change

    Getting To Know the Microbes that Drive Climate Change

    The genetics of viruses living along a permafrost thaw gradient may help scientists better predict the pace of climate change.

    Taking magnetism for a spin:

    Taking magnetism for a spin:

    Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have discovered the relaxation dynamics of a zero-field state in skyrmions, a spinning magnetic phenomenon that has potential applications in data storage and spintronic devices.

    A Challenging Future for Tropical Forests

    A Challenging Future for Tropical Forests

    Mortality rates of moist tropical forests are on the rise due to environmental drivers and related mechanisms.

    Stronger, lighter, greener

    Stronger, lighter, greener

    A new award-winning magnet technology invented at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory could help drive the nation's transition from gas-powered vehicles to electric and hybrid power more rapidly, at lower cost, and in a more environmentally friendly way.

    Science Up-Close: Developing a Cookbook for Efficient Fusion Energy

    Science Up-Close: Developing a Cookbook for Efficient Fusion Energy

    To develop a future fusion reactor, scientists need to understand how and why plasma in fusion experiments moves into a "high-confinement mode" where particles and heat can't escape. Scientists at the Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory simulated the transition into that mode starting from the most basic physics principles.

    Peering into the Mist: How Water Vapor Changes Metal at the Atomic Level

    Peering into the Mist: How Water Vapor Changes Metal at the Atomic Level

    New insights into molecular-level processes could help prevent corrosion and improve catalytic conversion.

    Neutron science publications reach new highs at ORNL's flagship facilities

    Neutron science publications reach new highs at ORNL's flagship facilities

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor and the Spallation Neutron Source at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have reached new levels of increased science productivity. In 2018, a record high of more than 500 scientific instrument publications were produced between HFIR and SNS--based on neutron beamline experiments conducted by more than 1,200 US and international researchers who used the world-leading facilities.

    Fiery sighting: A new physics of eruptions that damage fusion experiments

    Fiery sighting: A new physics of eruptions that damage fusion experiments

    Feature describes first direct sighting of a trigger for bursts of heat that can disrupt fusion reactions.

    Microbial Types May Prove Key to Gas Releases from Thawing Permafrost

    Microbial Types May Prove Key to Gas Releases from Thawing Permafrost

    Scientists discover key types of microbes that degrade organic matter and release carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere.

    An effect that Einstein helped discover 100 years ago offers new insight into a puzzling magnetic phenomenon

    An effect that Einstein helped discover 100 years ago offers new insight into a puzzling magnetic phenomenon

    Experiments at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have seen for the first time what happens when magnetic materials are demagnetized at ultrafast speeds of millionths of a billionth of a second: The atoms on the surface of the material move, much like the iron bar did. The work, done at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser, was published in Nature earlier this month.

    Found: A precise method for determining how waves and particles affect fusion reactions

    Found: A precise method for determining how waves and particles affect fusion reactions

    Like surfers catching ocean waves, particles within plasma can ride waves oscillating through the plasma during fusion energy experiments. Now a team of physicists led by PPPL has devised a faster method to determine how much this interaction contributes to efficiency loss in tokamaks.

    Discovery adapts natural membrane to make hydrogen fuel from water

    Discovery adapts natural membrane to make hydrogen fuel from water

    In a recent study from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, scientists have combined two membrane-bound protein complexes to perform a complete conversion of water molecules to hydrogen and oxygen.