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    Cool Roofs Can Help Shield California's Cities Against Heat Waves

    Cool Roofs Can Help Shield California's Cities Against Heat Waves

    A new study by researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory shows that if every building in California sported "cool" roofs by 2050, these roofs would help contribute to protecting urbanites from the consequences of dangerous heatwaves.

    Scientists discover potential path to improving samarium-cobalt magnets

    Scientists discover potential path to improving samarium-cobalt magnets

    Scientists have discovered a potential tool to enhance magnetization and magnetic anisotropy, making it possible to improve the performance of samarium-cobalt magnets.

    Atomic 'Trojan Horse' Could Inspire New Generation of X-Ray Lasers and Particle Colliders

    Atomic 'Trojan Horse' Could Inspire New Generation of X-Ray Lasers and Particle Colliders

    An international team of researchers, including scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, has demonstrated a potentially much brighter electron source based on plasma that could be used in more compact, more powerful particle accelerators.

    Improving the Magnetic Bottle That Controls Fusion Power on Earth

    Improving the Magnetic Bottle That Controls Fusion Power on Earth

    The exhaustive detection method that discovered the error field in the initial run of the NSTX-U tokamak could serve as a model for error-field detection in future tokamaks.

    PPPL apprenticeship program offers young people chance to earn while they learn high-tech careers

    PPPL apprenticeship program offers young people chance to earn while they learn high-tech careers

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, in partnership with the New Jersey Department of Labor, has embarked on a new apprenticeship program to teach high-tech skills to young people through four years of on-the-job training and technical courses.

    Is your Supercomputer Stumped? There May Be a Quantum Solution

    Is your Supercomputer Stumped? There May Be a Quantum Solution

    A new study led by a physicist at Berkeley Lab details how a quantum computing technique called "quantum annealing" can be used to solve problems relevant to fundamental questions in nuclear physics about the subatomic building blocks of all matter. It could also help answer other vexing questions in science and industry, too.

    Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, August 2019

    Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, August 2019

    ORNL story tips: Training next-generation sensors to "see," interpret live data; 3D printing tungsten could protect fusion reactor components; detailed study estimated how much more, or less, energy U.S. residents might consume by 2050 based on seasonal weather shifts; astrophysicists used ORNL supercomputer to create highest-ever-resolution galactic wind simulations; new solar-thermal desalination method improves energy efficiency.

    Scientists Cook Up New Recipes for Taking Salt Out of Seawater

    Scientists Cook Up New Recipes for Taking Salt Out of Seawater

    Scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) investigating how to make desalination less expensive have recently hit on promising design rules for making so-called "thermally responsive" ionic liquids to separate water from salt.

    Krypton reveals ancient water beneath the Israeli desert

    Krypton reveals ancient water beneath the Israeli desert

    Getting reliable precipitation data from the past has proven difficult, as is predicting regional changes for climate models in the present. A combination of isotope techniques developed by researchers at Argonne and UChicago may help resolve both.

    Neutrons shed light on industrial catalyst for hydrogen production

    Neutrons shed light on industrial catalyst for hydrogen production

    Collaborators at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and U.S. universities used neutron scattering and other advanced characterization techniques to study how a prominent catalyst enables the "water-gas shift" reaction to purify and generate hydrogen at industrial scale.

    A shock to behold: Earthbound scientists complement space missions by reproducing the dynamics behind astronomical shocks

    A shock to behold: Earthbound scientists complement space missions by reproducing the dynamics behind astronomical shocks

    Article describes first laboratory measurement of the precursors to high-energy astronomical shocks.

    Science Snapshots: chromosomes, crystals, and drones

    Science Snapshots: chromosomes, crystals, and drones

    From Berkeley Lab: exploring human origins in the uncharted territory of our chromosomes; scientists grow spiraling new material; drones will fly for days with this new technology

    Expanding the limits of personalized medicine with high-performance computing

    Expanding the limits of personalized medicine with high-performance computing

    Imagine that you have a serious medical condition. Then imagine that when you visit a team of doctors, they could build an identical virtual 'twin' of the condition and simulate millions of ways to treat it until they develop an effective treatment. That is the vision of a team of scientists, led by Argonne National Laboratory.

    Seeing more clearly: Revised computer code accurately models an instability in fusion plasmas

    Seeing more clearly: Revised computer code accurately models an instability in fusion plasmas

    Subatomic particles zip around fusion machines known as tokamaks and sometimes merge, releasing large amounts of energy. Now, physicists have confirmed that an updated computer code could help to predict and ultimately prevent the particles from leaking from the magnetic fields confining them.

    Raphael Hermann: Conducting Quantum Materials Research That Resonates

    Raphael Hermann: Conducting Quantum Materials Research That Resonates

    Profiled is Raphael Hermann of the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, who conducts experiments to better understand materials for energy and information applications.

    Learning to Look

    Learning to Look

    Inoviruses are filamentous viruses with small, single-stranded DNA genomes. Applying machine learning to more than 70,000 microbial and metagenome datasets, a team led by JGI scientists identified more than 10,000 inovirus-like sequences compared to the 56 previously known inovirus genomes.

    ORNL scientists make fundamental discovery to creating better crops

    ORNL scientists make fundamental discovery to creating better crops

    A team of scientists led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory have discovered the specific gene that controls an important symbiotic relationship between plants and soil fungi, and successfully facilitated the symbiosis in a plant that typically resists it.

    New Laws of Attraction: Scientists Print Magnetic Liquid Droplets

    New Laws of Attraction: Scientists Print Magnetic Liquid Droplets

    Scientists at Berkeley Lab have 3D-printed a magnetic device out of liquids. Their findings could lead to printable liquid magnetic devices for a variety of applications such as artificial cells that deliver targeted cancer therapies to flexible liquid robots.

    A sharper focus: New computational technique resolves compressed X-ray data

    A sharper focus: New computational technique resolves compressed X-ray data

    With high-energy X-rays, such as those that will be produced by the upgrade to Argonne's Advanced Photon Source comes a potential hitch -- the more penetrating the X-rays are, the higher a likelihood that researchers could run into problems with the image data. In a new study, researchers at Argonne have found a novel way to combat this image degradation.

    A Graphene Superconductor That Plays More Than One Tune

    A Graphene Superconductor That Plays More Than One Tune

    Researchers at Berkeley Lab have developed a graphene device that switches from a superconducting material that conducts electricity without losing any energy, to an insulator that resists the flow of electric current - all with a simple flip of a switch.

    After blasting a molecule with light, researchers watch its structure vibrate and change in real time

    After blasting a molecule with light, researchers watch its structure vibrate and change in real time

    A new study describes how a team of researchers watched a molecule vibrate after they excited it with ultraviolet light.

    Scientists deepen understanding of the magnetic fields that surround the Earth and other planets

    Scientists deepen understanding of the magnetic fields that surround the Earth and other planets

    Now, a team of scientists has completed research into waves that travel through the magnetosphere, deepening understanding of the region and its interaction with our own planet, and opening up new ways to study other planets across the galaxy.

    Light dark matter is a thousand times less likely to bump into regular matter than previous astrophysical analyses allowed

    Light dark matter is a thousand times less likely to bump into regular matter than previous astrophysical analyses allowed

    A team led by scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University has narrowed down how strongly dark matter particles might interact with normal matter. Based on the number and distribution of small satellite galaxies seen orbiting our Milky Way, the team found this interaction to be at least a thousand times weaker than the strongest interaction allowed by previous astrophysical analyses.

    New Sensor Could Shake Up Earthquake Response Efforts

    New Sensor Could Shake Up Earthquake Response Efforts

    An optical sensor developed at Berkeley Lab could speed up the time it takes to evaluate whether buildings are safe to occupy after a major earthquake. After four years of extensive peer-reviewed research and simulative testing at the University of Nevada's Earthquake Engineering Laboratory, the Discrete Diode Position Sensor (DDPS) will be deployed for the first time this summer in a multi-story building at Berkeley Lab - which sits adjacent to the Hayward Fault, considered one of the most dangerous faults in the United States.

    The best of both worlds: how to solve real problems on modern quantum computers

    The best of both worlds: how to solve real problems on modern quantum computers

    Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory, along with researchers at Clemson University and Fujitsu Laboratories of America, have developed hybrid algorithms to run on size-limited quantum machines and have demonstrated them for practical applications.