logo
Latest News
    New microscopy method provides more details about nanocomposites

    New microscopy method provides more details about nanocomposites

    Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have developed a new microscopy approach for imaging gel nanocomposites in their natural state, which will reveal more useful information about their assembly and properties.

    Getting to the Root of Plant Simulations

    Getting to the Root of Plant Simulations

    Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory developed a new algorithm to bolster what once were static models of root dynamics, providing researchers a clearer picture of what's really happening beneath the soil. The work, published in the January 28 issue of the Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems, describes the dynamic root model and its use with the Energy Exascale Earth System Land Model (ELM), a component of the DOE's larger Energy Exascale Earth System Model (E3SM).

    Atomic Maps Reveal How Iron Rusts

    Atomic Maps Reveal How Iron Rusts

    Scientists discovered how iron atoms continually re-arrange on surfaces, offering insights into metal corrosion and soil remediation.

    Strain and Defects Grow in Tiny Magnetite Crystals When Oxidized

    Strain and Defects Grow in Tiny Magnetite Crystals When Oxidized

    Detailed 3D images show how nanoparticles change in reactions that purify contaminated water or power recyclable geochemical batteries.

    'Electron Shuttle' Protein Plays Key Role in Plant Cell-Wall Construction

    'Electron Shuttle' Protein Plays Key Role in Plant Cell-Wall Construction

    Scientists studying plant cell walls have discovered mechanistic details of a protein involved in the assembly of lignin, a key cell-wall component. The protein acts as a targeted "electron shuttle," delivering the "fuel" that drives the construction of one specific lignin building block. Controlling the flow of electrons by targeting shuttle proteins could be a new strategy for guiding plants to make desired products.

    Newly Devised Static Negative Capacitor Could Improve Computing

    Newly Devised Static Negative Capacitor Could Improve Computing

    In a new study, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, together with collaborators in France and Russia, have created a permanent static "negative capacitor," a device believed to have been in violation of physical laws until about a decade ago.

    A New View on a Very Old Problem: Evolution of the Photochemical Reaction Centers

    A New View on a Very Old Problem: Evolution of the Photochemical Reaction Centers

    Researchers offer insights into how a key piece of photosynthetic machinery changed over 3 billion years.

    Squeezed nanocrystals: A new model predicts their shape when blanketed under graphene

    Squeezed nanocrystals: A new model predicts their shape when blanketed under graphene

    In a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and Northeastern University, scientists have developed a model for predicting the shape of metal nanocrystals or "islands" sandwiched between or below two-dimensional (2D) materials such as graphene. The advance moves 2D quantum materials a step closer to applications in electronics.

    Ghostly X-ray images could provide key info for analyzing X-ray laser experiments

    Ghostly X-ray images could provide key info for analyzing X-ray laser experiments

    Computer simulations by scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory suggest that a new method could turn random fluctuations in the intensity of laser pulses from a nuisance into an advantage, facilitating studies of these fundamental interactions.

    Scientists Pioneer New Low-Temperature Chemical Conversion Process

    Scientists Pioneer New Low-Temperature Chemical Conversion Process

    In a recent study from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, chemists have identified a way to convert cyclohexane to cyclohexene or cyclohexadiene, important chemicals in a wide range of industrial processes.

    Through machine learning, new model holds water

    Through machine learning, new model holds water

    A new study from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory has achieved a pivotal breakthrough in the effort to mathematically represent how water behaves.

    Scientists capture live, atomic-level detail of nanoparticle formation

    Scientists capture live, atomic-level detail of nanoparticle formation

    Scientists at the Sensitive Instrument Facility of the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory achieved real-time atom rearrangement monitoring using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy during the synthesis of intermetallic nanoparticles (iNPs).

    Researchers Tap Rare Pristine Air to Reveal Pollution's Impact

    Researchers Tap Rare Pristine Air to Reveal Pollution's Impact

    Human-caused pollution spurs the production of climate-changing particles known as secondary organic aerosols much more than previously thought. Researchers made the finding by analyzing air samples that were captured aboard a research aircraft as it zig-zagged between pristine air over the Amazon rainforest and polluted air over the city of Manaus.

    Story Tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, April 2019

    Story Tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, April 2019

    ORNL used artificial intelligence to analyze data about bullying to reveal potential of broader impacts; flexible sensor wraps around power cables to monitor electrical loads from household appliances; ORNL is evaluating paths for licensing remotely operated microreactors; ORNL used carbon nanotubes to improve process that removes salt from water

    Putting a New Spin on Majorana Fermions

    Putting a New Spin on Majorana Fermions

    Scientists have proposed a new method for producing more robust Majorana fermions, a kind of quasiparticle that could act as stable bits of information in next-generation quantum computers.

    Breakthrough Study of Cell Signaling Holds Promise for Immune Research and Beyond

    Breakthrough Study of Cell Signaling Holds Promise for Immune Research and Beyond

    For the first time ever, scientists have imaged the process by which an individual immune system molecule is switched on in response to a signal from the environment. The new work provides an enormous leap forward in our understanding of how T cells detect viruses and may provide unique insights into autoimmune diseases and cancer immunotherapy.

    Ice Sheet Modeling Probes Antarctic Vulnerabilities

    Ice Sheet Modeling Probes Antarctic Vulnerabilities

    The BISICLES ice sheet model uses high performance computing resources at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) to systematically examine where the Antarctic Ice Sheet is vulnerable and the resulting potential for large contributions to sea level rise.

    ORNL investigates complex uranium oxides with help from CADES resources

    ORNL investigates complex uranium oxides with help from CADES resources

    To accelerate the process of identifying novel uranium oxide phases, an ORNL team studied 4,600 different potential crystal structures of uranium oxide compositions on Metis, a CADES high-performance computing cluster. An improved understanding of uranium oxides, which fuel the vast majority of the U.S. nuclear power fleet, could lead to the development of improved fuels or waste storage materials.

    Illuminating Water Filtration

    Illuminating Water Filtration

    UPTON, NY--For the first time, a team of researchers from Stony Brook University and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have revealed the molecular structure of membranes used in reverse osmosis. The research is reported in a recently published paper in ACS Macro Letters, a journal of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

    Modified deep-learning algorithms unveil features of shape-shifting proteins

    Modified deep-learning algorithms unveil features of shape-shifting proteins

    To function properly, proteins must morph into specific 3D shapes through a biophysical phenomenon called protein folding. Researchers at ORNL are using various deep-learning techniques to study the intermediate protein stages between the initial unfolded state and the final folded state, which are notoriously difficult to characterize. These methods could also help identify factors that cause proteins to "misfold" into dysfunctional shapes, a phenomenon often attributed as a leading factor in the development of diseases including Alzheimer's, cardiovascular disorders, and diabetes.

    Scaling forward

    Scaling forward

    An Argonne scientist has new ways of accelerating the development of new organic materials for electronics. The new approaches could have applications in other types of materials science research.

    Optical "tweezers" combine with X-rays to enable analysis of crystals in liquids

    Optical "tweezers" combine with X-rays to enable analysis of crystals in liquids

    Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have developed a new technique that combines the power of microscale "tractor beams" with high-powered X-rays, enabling them to see and manipulate crystals freely floating in solution.

    The Best Topological Conductor Yet: Spiraling Crystal Is the Key to Exotic Discovery

    The Best Topological Conductor Yet: Spiraling Crystal Is the Key to Exotic Discovery

    A team of researchers working at Berkeley Lab has discovered the strongest topological conductor yet, in the form of thin crystal samples that have a spiral-staircase structure. The team's result is reported in the March 20 edition of the journal Nature.

    Neutrons paint atomic portrait of prototypical cell signaling enzyme

    Neutrons paint atomic portrait of prototypical cell signaling enzyme

    Direct observations of the structure and catalytic mechanism of a prototypical kinase enzyme--protein kinase A or PKA--will provide researchers and drug developers with significantly enhanced abilities to understand and treat fatal diseases and neurological disorders such as cancer, diabetes, and cystic fibrosis. The discovery was made by an international team of researchers using macromolecular neutron crystallography at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble, France.

    Speeding the development of fusion power to create unlimited energy on Earth

    Speeding the development of fusion power to create unlimited energy on Earth

    A detailed examination of the challenges and tradeoffs in the development of a compact fusion facility with high-temperature super-conducting magnets.