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    On the Path Toward Bionic Enzymes

    On the Path Toward Bionic Enzymes

    Berkeley Lab chemists have successfully married chemistry and biology to create reactions never before possible. They did this by replacing the iron normally found in the muscle protein myoglobin with iridium, a noble metal not known to be used by living systems.

    Weird, Water-Oozing Material Could Help Quench Thirst

    Weird, Water-Oozing Material Could Help Quench Thirst

    Nanorods created by PNNL researchers have an unusual property - spontaneously emitting water. After further development, the nanorods could be used for water harvesting and purification, or sweat-gathering fabric.

    New X-Ray Method Allows Scientists to Probe Molecular Explosions

    New X-Ray Method Allows Scientists to Probe Molecular Explosions

    A team led by researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory used the high-intensity, quick-burst X-rays provided by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to look at how the atoms in a molecule change when the molecule is bombarded with X-rays.

    X-Ray Experiments Show Hewlett Packard Team How Memristors Work

    X-Ray Experiments Show Hewlett Packard Team How Memristors Work

    In experiments at two Department of Energy national labs - SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory - scientists at Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) have experimentally confirmed critical aspects of how a new type of microelectronic device, the memristor, works at an atomic scale.

    Opening Neurotransmission's Gatekeepers

    Opening Neurotransmission's Gatekeepers

    In 2015, Harel Weinstein's team used the Titan supercomputer at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to produce the first end-to-end simulation of a sodium ion, the fuel that powers neurotransmitter sodium symporters, moving from the synapse into the cell via the dopamine transporter (DAT), the gatekeeper for the neurotransmitter dopamine that is associated with reward-motivated behavior.

    Drying Arctic Soils Could Accelerate Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Drying Arctic Soils Could Accelerate Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    A new study published in Nature Climate Change indicates soil moisture levels will determine how much carbon is released to the atmosphere as rising temperatures thaw Arctic lands.

    Neutrons Reveal Unexpected Magnetism in Rare-Earth Alloy

    Neutrons Reveal Unexpected Magnetism in Rare-Earth Alloy

    Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and their collaborators used neutron scattering to uncover magnetic excitations in the metallic compound ytterbium-platinum-lead. Surprisingly, this three-dimensional material exhibits magnetic properties that one would conventionally expect if the connectivity between magnetic ions was only one-dimensional. A better understanding of those behaviors could lead to applications in quantum computing and improved storage device technologies.

    Researchers Gear Up Galaxy-Seeking Robots for a Test Run

    Researchers Gear Up Galaxy-Seeking Robots for a Test Run

    A prototype system that will test a planned array of 5,000 robots for a sky-mapping instrument is taking shape at Berkeley Lab. Dubbed ProtoDESI, the scaled-down, 10-robot system will run through a series of tests on a telescope in Arizona from August-September.

    DNA Shaping Up to be Ideal Framework for Rationally Designed Nanostructures

    DNA Shaping Up to be Ideal Framework for Rationally Designed Nanostructures

    Scientists developed two DNA-based nanostructure self-assembly approaches: one allows the same nanoparticles to be connected into a variety of 3D structures; the other facilitates the integration of different nanoparticles and DNA frames into interconnecting modules.

    New Material Has Potential to Cut Costs and Make Nuclear Fuel Recycling Cleaner

    New Material Has Potential to Cut Costs and Make Nuclear Fuel Recycling Cleaner

    Researchers are investigating a new material that might help in nuclear fuel recycling and waste reduction by capturing certain gases released during reprocessing more efficiently than today's technology. The metal-organic framework captures gases at ambient temperature, eliminating an energy-intensive step.

    New Material Has Potential to Cut Costs and Make Nuclear Fuel Recycling Cleaner

    New Material Has Potential to Cut Costs and Make Nuclear Fuel Recycling Cleaner

    Researchers are investigating a new material that might help in nuclear fuel recycling and waste reduction by capturing certain gases released during reprocessing. Conventional technologies to remove these radioactive gases operate at extremely low, energy-intensive temperatures. By working at ambient temperature, the new material has the potential to save energy, make reprocessing cleaner and less expensive. The reclaimed materials can also be reused commercially.

    Butterfly Effects: X-Rays Reveal the Photonic Crystals in Butterfly Wings That Create Color

    Butterfly Effects: X-Rays Reveal the Photonic Crystals in Butterfly Wings That Create Color

    Scientists used X-rays to discover what creates one butterfly effect: how the microscopic structures on the insect's wings reflect light to appear as brilliant colors to the eye.

    New Mathematics Accurately Captures Liquids and Surfaces Moving in Synergy

    New Mathematics Accurately Captures Liquids and Surfaces Moving in Synergy

    A new mathematical framework developed at Berkeley Lab, published in the June 10 issue of Science Advances, allows researchers to capture fluid dynamics coupled to interface motion at unprecedented detail. The framework, called "interfacial gauge methods", developed by Robert Saye, a Luis W. Alvarez Fellow in the Mathematics Group at Berkeley Lab, rewrites the equations governing incompressible fluid flow in a way that is more amenable to accurate computer modeling.

    A New Way to Control Oxygen for Electronic Properties

    A New Way to Control Oxygen for Electronic Properties

    Researchers at Argonne found they could use a small electric current to introduce oxygen voids, or vacancies, that dramatically change the conductivity of thin oxide films.

     Messina Discusses Rewards, Challenges for New Exascale Project

    Messina Discusses Rewards, Challenges for New Exascale Project

    The exascale initiative has an ambitious goal: to develop supercomputers a hundred times more powerful than today's systems. Argonne Distinguished Fellow Paul Messina, who has been tapped to lead a DOE/NNSA project designed to pave the way, speaks on the potential for exascale and the challenges along the way.

    Massive Trove of Battery and Molecule Data Released to Public

    Massive Trove of Battery and Molecule Data Released to Public

    The Materials Project, a Google-like database of material properties aimed at accelerating innovation, has released an enormous trove of data to the public, giving scientists working on batteries, fuel cells, photovoltaics, thermoelectrics, and a host of other advanced materials a powerful tool to explore new research avenues.

    Provisional Names Announced for Superheavy Elements 113, 115, 117, and 118

    Provisional Names Announced for Superheavy Elements 113, 115, 117, and 118

    The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) Inorganic Chemistry Division has published a Provisional Recommendation for the names and symbols of the recently discovered superheavy elements 113, 115, 117, and 118.

    ORNL Research Finds Magnetic Material Could Host Wily Weyl Fermions

    ORNL Research Finds Magnetic Material Could Host Wily Weyl Fermions

    An elusive massless particle could exist in a magnetic crystal structure, revealed by neutron and X-ray research from a team of scientists led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee.

    New Chemical 'Sponges' Designed to Soak Up Toxic Cancer-Fighting Drugs After Targeting Tumors

    New Chemical 'Sponges' Designed to Soak Up Toxic Cancer-Fighting Drugs After Targeting Tumors

    Researchers at Berkeley Lab are developing and testing materials for a new device that can be inserted via a tiny tube into a vein and soak up cancer-fighting drugs after they deliver a dose to tumors--and before they can widely circulate in the body.

    Copper Is Key in Burning Fat

    Copper Is Key in Burning Fat

    A new study led by a Berkeley Lab scientist and UC Berkeley professor establishes for the first time copper's role in fat metabolism, further burnishing the metal's reputation as an essential nutrient for human physiology.

    Story Tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, June 2016

    Story Tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, June 2016

    New battery technology a boost for Formula E race cars; New ORNL roof coating helps keep roofs cool; ORNL technique reveals defects in solar cell material; ORNL finding shows promise for alternating current conduction for oxide electronics.

    Echo Technique Developed at SLAC Could Make X-Ray Lasers More Stable

    Echo Technique Developed at SLAC Could Make X-Ray Lasers More Stable

    Researchers from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China have developed a method that could open up new scientific avenues by making the light from powerful X-ray lasers much more stable and its color more pure.

    Scientists Use a Frozen Gas to Boost Laser Light to New Extremes

    Scientists Use a Frozen Gas to Boost Laser Light to New Extremes

    Researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University and Louisiana State University have achieved an even more dramatic HHG shift by shining an infrared laser through argon gas that's been frozen into a thin, fragile solid whose atoms barely cling to each other.

    New Alloy Promises to Boost Rare Earth Production While Improving Energy Efficiency of Engines

    New Alloy Promises to Boost Rare Earth Production While Improving Energy Efficiency of Engines

    Researchers have developed aluminum alloys that are both easier to work with and more heat tolerant than existing products.