logo
Latest News
    Thinning Out the Carbon Capture Viscosity Problem

    Thinning Out the Carbon Capture Viscosity Problem

    Researchers have used computer modeling to design these liquid materials so that they retain a low viscosity after sponging up carbon dioxide, based on a surprise they found in their explorations. Although the chemists still have to test the predicted liquid in the lab, being able to predict viscosity will help researchers find and design cheaper, more efficient carbon capture materials, they report in Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.

    Gone with the Wind: Argonne Coating Shows Surprising Potential to Improve Reliability in Wind Power

    Gone with the Wind: Argonne Coating Shows Surprising Potential to Improve Reliability in Wind Power

    A group of researchers from the Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Akron discovered that a particular form of carbon coating not necessarily designed for wind turbines may indeed prove a boon to the wind industry--a serendipitous finding that was recently highlighted in the journal Tribology International.

    Speeding Up Key Oxygen-Oxygen Bond-Formation Step in Water Oxidation

    Speeding Up Key Oxygen-Oxygen Bond-Formation Step in Water Oxidation

    By accelerating the formation of the oxygen-oxygen bond in water oxidation, newly developed ruthenium catalysts could drive the reaction needed to efficiently store solar energy in the chemical bonds of clean fuels.

    $40M to Establish New Observatory Probing Early Universe

    $40M to Establish New Observatory Probing Early Universe

    A new astronomy facility, the Simons Observatory, is planned in Chile's Atacama Desert to boost ongoing studies of the evolution of the universe, from its earliest moments to today. The observatory will probe the subtle properties of the universe's first light, known as cosmic microwave background radiation.

    Berkeley Lab Scientists Discover Surprising New Properties in a 2-D Semiconductor

    Berkeley Lab Scientists Discover Surprising New Properties in a 2-D Semiconductor

    Researchers found how substantial linear defects in a new semiconductor create entirely new properties. Some of these properties indicate the defects might even mediate superconducting states.

    Scientists Take a Major Leap Toward a 'Perfect' Quantum Metamaterial

    Scientists Take a Major Leap Toward a 'Perfect' Quantum Metamaterial

    Scientists have devised a way to build a "quantum metamaterial"--an engineered material with exotic properties not found in nature--using ultracold atoms trapped in an artificial crystal composed of light. The theoretical work represents a step toward manipulating atoms to transmit information, perform complex simulations or function as powerful sensors.

    Berkeley Lab Scientists Brew Jet Fuel in One-Pot Recipe

    Berkeley Lab Scientists Brew Jet Fuel in One-Pot Recipe

    Berkeley Lab scientists have engineered a strain of bacteria that enables a "one-pot" method for producing advanced biofuels from a slurry of pre-treated plant material. The achievement, described in a study to be published May 10 in Green Chemistry, is a critical step in making biofuels a viable competitor to fossil fuels.

    Argonne Rolls Out New Version of Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Analysis Tool

    Argonne Rolls Out New Version of Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Analysis Tool

    This week Argonne National Laboratory is releasing an updated version of its alternative fuels and advanced vehicles analysis tool to reflect the latest advances in alternative fuels and vehicle technologies and updated emissions data. The free, publicly-available tool provides users with a roadmap for assessing which types of vehicles and fuels are right for them.

    Berkeley Lab Scientists Part of New Particle-Hunting Season at CERN's LHC

    Berkeley Lab Scientists Part of New Particle-Hunting Season at CERN's LHC

    Berkeley Lab scientists thousands of collaborators worldwide who will be sifting through loads of new data expected from this latest experimental run at CERN's Large Hadron Collider, which could reveal unexpected twists in the makeup of matter and shed more light on the known pantheon of particles including the Higgs boson.

    Neutrons Tap Into Magnetism in Topological Insulators at High Temperatures

    Neutrons Tap Into Magnetism in Topological Insulators at High Temperatures

    Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and their collaborators used neutron scattering to reveal magnetic moments in hybrid topological insulator (TI) materials at room temperature, hundreds of degrees Fahrenheit warmer than the extreme sub-zero cold where the properties are expected to occur. The discovery promises new opportunities for next-generation electronic and spintronic devices such as improved transistors and quantum computing technologies.

    Visualizing the Lithiation of a Nanosized Iron-Oxide Material in Real Time

    Visualizing the Lithiation of a Nanosized Iron-Oxide Material in Real Time

    An electron microscopy technique for visualizing how lithium ions migrate at the nanoscale could help improve the performance of lithium-ion batteries.

    Speedy Ion Conduction in Solid Electrolytes Clears Road for Advanced Energy Devices

    Speedy Ion Conduction in Solid Electrolytes Clears Road for Advanced Energy Devices

    A team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory detected a feature in a solid electrolyte and experimentally verified its importance to fast ion transport. The work points out a new strategy for design of highly conductive solid electrolytes.

    Scientists Watch Bacterial Sensor Respond to Light in Real Time

    Scientists Watch Bacterial Sensor Respond to Light in Real Time

    Researchers have made a giant leap forward in taking snapshots of these ultrafast reactions in a bacterial light sensor. Using the world's most powerful X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, they were able to see atomic motions as fast as 100 quadrillionths of a second - 1,000 times faster than ever before.

    Getting a Better Measure of Spin with Diamond

    Getting a Better Measure of Spin with Diamond

    Diamonds are one of the most coveted gemstones. But while some may want the perfect diamond for its sparkle, physicists covet the right diamonds to perfect their experiments. The gem is a key component in a novel system that enables precision measurements that could lead to the discovery of new physics in the sub-atomic realm -- the domain of the particles and forces that build the nucleus of the atom.

    Story Tips From the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory May 2016

    Story Tips From the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory May 2016

    ORNL's GLIDES features advanced energy storage technology; Old tires get new life in sodium-ion batteries; Silicon carbide shows promise for reactor fuel, core structures; ORNL, Boeing collaboration delivers impressive results

    PPPL Scientists Challenge Conventional Understanding and Improve Predictions of the Bootstrap Current at the Edge of Fusion Plasmas

    PPPL Scientists Challenge Conventional Understanding and Improve Predictions of the Bootstrap Current at the Edge of Fusion Plasmas

    Article describes new finding of the composition of the bootstrap current at the edge of fusion plasmas.

    A Cleansing Rain Falls; A Soil-Filled Mist Arises

    A Cleansing Rain Falls; A Soil-Filled Mist Arises

    Scientists have found that rain triggers the release of a mist of particles from wet soils into the air, a finding with consequences for how scientists model our planet's climate and future. The evidence comes in the form of tiny glassy spheres, less than one-hundredth the width of a human hair, discovered in the Great Plains.

    Math Helps Scientists Capture Molecules in Motion

    Math Helps Scientists Capture Molecules in Motion

    Using data from the world's most powerful X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, an international team of scientists has made a crucial advance in analyzing ultrafast motions of molecules. They developed a computational method that increases the accuracy of this analysis 300 times - to one femtosecond, which is a millionth of a billionth of a second.

    Seeing Atoms and Molecules in Action with an Electron 'Eye'

    Seeing Atoms and Molecules in Action with an Electron 'Eye'

    A unique rapid-fire electron source--originally built as a prototype for driving next-generation X-ray lasers--will help scientists at Berkeley Lab study ultrafast chemical processes and changes in materials at the atomic scale.

    ORNL Researchers Discover New State of Water Molecule

    ORNL Researchers Discover New State of Water Molecule

    Neutron scattering and computational modeling have revealed unique and unexpected behavior of water molecules under extreme confinement that is unmatched by any known gas, liquid or solid states.

    Bakery Switches to Propane Vans

    Bakery Switches to Propane Vans

    A switch to propane from diesel by a major Midwest bakery fleet showed promising results, including a significant displacement of petroleum, a drop in greenhouse gases and a fuel cost savings of 7 cents per mile, according to a study recently completed by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory.

    Cleaning Up Hybrid Battery Electrodes Improves Capacity and Lifespan

    Cleaning Up Hybrid Battery Electrodes Improves Capacity and Lifespan

    Hybrid batteries that charge faster than conventional ones could have significantly better electrical capacity and long-term stability when prepared with a gentle-sounding way of making electrodes. Called ion soft-landing, the high-precision technique resulted in electrodes that could store a third more energy and had twice the lifespan compared to those prepared by a conventional method, the researchers report today in Nature Communications.

    Advances in Extracting Uranium From Seawater Announced in Special Issue

    Advances in Extracting Uranium From Seawater Announced in Special Issue

    The oceans hold more than four billion tons of uranium--enough to meet global energy needs for the next 10,000 years if only we could capture the element from seawater to fuel nuclear power plants. Major advances in this area have been published.

    What Screens Are Made Of: New Twists (and Bends) in LCD Research

    What Screens Are Made Of: New Twists (and Bends) in LCD Research

    A research team has directly measured a spiral molecular arrangement formed by liquid crystals that could help unravel its mysteries and possibly improve the performance of electronic displays.

    Unexpected Discovery Leads to a Better Battery

    Unexpected Discovery Leads to a Better Battery

    An unexpected discovery has led to a zinc-manganese oxide rechargeable battery that's as inexpensive as conventional car batteries, but has a much higher energy density.