Understanding the Rice Genome for Bioenergy Research

Genome-wide rice studies yield first major, large-scale collection of mutations for grass model crops, vital to boosting biofuel production.

Columbia Researchers Observe Exotic Quantum Particle in Bilayer Graphene

A Columbia team has definitively observed an intensely studied anomaly in condensed matter physics--the even-denominator fractional quantum Hall  state--via transport measurement in bilayer graphene. "Observing the 5/2 state in any system is a remarkable scientific opportunity, since it encompasses some of the most perplexing concepts in modern condensed matter physics, such as emergence, quasi-particle formation, quantization, and even superconductivity ...[It may have] great potential for real-world applications, particularly in quantum computing." (Science)

Liverwort Genes and Land Plant Evolution

An international team including DOE Joint Genome Institute researchers analyzed the genome sequence of the common liverwort (Marchantia polymorpha) to identify genes and gene families deemed crucial to plant evolution and have been conserved over millions of years and across plant lineages.

Paper-Based Supercapacitor Uses Metal Nanoparticles to Boost Energy Density

Using a simple layer-by-layer coating technique, researchers from the U.S. and Korea have developed a paper-based flexible supercapacitor that could be used to help power wearable devices. The device uses metallic nanoparticles to coat cellulose fibers in the paper, creating supercapacitor electrodes with high energy and power densities - and the best performance so far in a textile-based supercapacitor.

New 'Molecular Trap' Cleans More Radioactive Waste From Nuclear Fuel Rods

A new method for capturing radioactive waste from nuclear power plants is cheaper and more effective than current methods, a potential boon for the energy industry, according to new research published in the journal Nature Communications.

Story Tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, October 2017

A method developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory could protect connected and autonomous vehicles from possible network intrusion. A new ORNL technique makes ultrafast measurements using atomic force microscopy.

SLAC Invention Could Lead to Novel Terahertz Light Sources That Help Us See the World with Different Eyes

Ever since the discovery of X-rays in 1895, their ability to reveal things hidden to the human eye has created endless opportunities. But X-rays by far aren't the only option to see the world with different eyes. Researchers hope to make better use of a different form of light, called terahertz radiation, which has broad applications in science, radar, security, medicine and communications.

Assessing Regional Earthquake Risk and Hazards in the Age of Exascale

Researchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore Lab and UC Davis are building the first-ever end-to-end simulation code to precisely capture the geology and physics of regional earthquakes, and how the shaking impacts buildings

In Iceland Stream, Possible Glimpse Of Warming Future

When a normally cold stream in Iceland was warmed, the make-up of life inside changed as larger organisms thrived while smaller ones struggled. The findings carry implications for life in a warming climate.

Tungsten Offers Nano-Interconnects a Path of Least Resistance

As microchips become smaller and faster, the shrinking size of their copper interconnects leads to increased electrical resistivity at the nanoscale. Finding a solution to this technical bottleneck is a problem for the semiconductor industry; one possibility involves reducing the resistivity size effect by altering the crystalline orientation of interconnect materials. Researchers conducted electron transport measurements in epitaxial single-crystal layers of tungsten as one potential solution. The work is published in this week's Journal of Applied Physics.

Benchmarking Computational Methods for Metagenomes

In Nature Methods, a team including DOE JGI researchers described the results of the Critical Assessment of Metagenome Interpretation (CAMI) Challenge, the first-ever, community-organized benchmarking assessment of computational tools for metagenomes.

Surrounded by Potential: New Science in Converting Biomass

To take full advantage of biomass, lignin needs to be processed into usable components along with the plant cellulose. Ames Laboratory scientists are working to develop a method to deconstruct lignin in a way that is economically feasible and into stable, readily useful components.

Drawing at the One-Nanometer Length Scale

Scientists set record resolution for patterning materials at sizes as small as a single nanometer using microscope-based lithography.

The Road Less Traveled: How to Switch Assembly Pathways

Big impacts on crystal formation result from small changes and reveal design principles for new materials for solar cells, more.

Blurring the Line between Animate and Inanimate: "Active" Matter Drives Self-Propelled Fluid

For the first time, self-organized, soft machines powered by molecular motors propelled fluid for hours across meters.

New Efficient Catalyst for Key Step in Artificial Photosynthesis

UPTON, NY--Chemists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have designed a new catalyst that speeds up the rate of a key step in "artificial photosynthesis"--an effort to mimic how plants, algae, and some bacteria harness sunlight to convert water and carbon dioxide into energy-rich fuels.

A Sea of Spinning Electrons

Picture two schools of fish swimming in clockwise and counterclockwise circles. It's enough to make your head spin, and now scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick and the University of Florida have discovered the "chiral spin mode" - a sea of electrons spinning in opposing circles.

A Potential New and Easy Way to Make Attosecond Laser Pulses: Focus a Laser on Ordinary Glass

Scientists from the Stanford PULSE Institute at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have found a potential new way to make attosecond laser pulses using ordinary glass - in this case, the cover slip from a microscope slide.

Small Scale Energy Harvesters Show Large Scale Impact

Nano-scale modeling of piezoelectric energy harvester offers a new nano-scale sensor design and demonstrates important design elements for efficient implementation.

New Study Finds Expected Savings from School Energy Efficiency Upgrade Outpace Actual Returns

Students returning to school this Fall may not think much about the significant amount of energy it takes to keep the lights on and their classroom smartboards operating, but principals, superintendents, and building managers are taking note. According to the EPA, schools nationwide spend $8 billion a year on energy - second only to personnel in K-12 operating budgets.

Turbocharging Engine Design

Researchers at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have moved the development process into the passing lane. For the first time, Argonne's scientists and engineers pinpointed engine designs for a given fuel using the Mira supercomputer at the heart of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

Researchers Develop a Way to Better Predict Corrosion from Crude Oil

Using X-ray techniques, scientists are developing an analysis tool that can more accurately predict how sulfur compounds in a batch of crude oil might corrode equipment- an important safety issue for the oil industry.

IceCube Helps Demystify Strange Radio Bursts From Deep Space

A University of Wisconsin-Madison physicist and his colleagues are turning IceCube, the world's most sensitive neutrino telescope, to the task of helping demystify powerful pulses of radio energy generated up to billions of light-years from Earth.

Nanoparticle Supersoap Creates 'Bijel' With Potential as Sculptable Fluid

A new type of "bijel" created by Berkeley Lab scientists could one day lead to applications in soft robotics, liquid circuitry, and energy conversion.

With Extra Sugar, Leaves Get Fat Too

Eat too much without exercising and you'll probably put on a few pounds. As it turns out, plant leaves do something similar. In a new study at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, scientists show that retaining sugars in plant leaves can make them get fat too. In plants, this extra fat accumulation could be a good thing.