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    Extreme-Scale Code Models Extremely Hot Plasma to Explain Spontaneous Transition

    Extreme-Scale Code Models Extremely Hot Plasma to Explain Spontaneous Transition

    For the first time, scientists modeled the spontaneous bifurcation of turbulence to high-confinement mode, solving a 35-year-old mystery.

    Launching a Supercomputer: How to Set Up Some of the World's Fastest Computers

    Launching a Supercomputer: How to Set Up Some of the World's Fastest Computers

    Setting up a supercomputer is far more complicated than just bringing it home from the electronics store. Staff members of the Department of Energy's supercomputing user facilities spend years on the process, from laying out requirements through troubleshooting. In the end, they run some of the most powerful computers in the world to help solve some of science's biggest problems.

    A New Oxidation State for Plutonium

    A New Oxidation State for Plutonium

    Plutonium has more verified and accessible oxidation states than any other actinide element, an important insight for energy and security applications.

    A Traffic Cop for Molecules

    A Traffic Cop for Molecules

    Easily manufactured, rigid membranes with ultra-small pores provides to be ultra-selective in separating chemicals.

    Creating a Molecular Super Sponge, From the Ground Up

    Creating a Molecular Super Sponge, From the Ground Up

    A new uranium-based metal-organic framework, NU-1301, could aid energy producers and industry.

    Physicists Move Closer to Listening in on Sub-Atomic Conversation

    Physicists Move Closer to Listening in on Sub-Atomic Conversation

    Calculations of a subatomic particle called the sigma provide insight into the communication between subatomic particles deep inside the heart of matter.

    Meet the Director: Chuck Black

    Meet the Director: Chuck Black

    This is a continuing profile series on the directors of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facilities. These scientists lead a variety of research institutions that provide researchers with the most advanced tools of modern science including accelerators, colliders, supercomputers, light sources and neutron sources, as well as facilities for studying the nano world, the environment, and the atmosphere.

    Making an Ultra-small Silicon "Chip"

    Making an Ultra-small Silicon "Chip"

    A new polymer, created with a structure inspired by crystalline silicon, may make it easier to build better computers and solar cells.

    How to Keep a Vital Diagnostic Isotope in Stock

    How to Keep a Vital Diagnostic Isotope in Stock

    Researchers succeed in producing larger quantities of a long-lived radioisotope, titanium-44, that generates a needed isotope, scandium-44g, on demand.

    When Strontium Is Away, Iridium Comes Out to Play

    When Strontium Is Away, Iridium Comes Out to Play

    Developing a highly active and acid-stable catalyst for water splitting could significantly impact solar energy technologies.

    On Track Towards a Zika Virus Vaccine

    On Track Towards a Zika Virus Vaccine

    Antibody's molecular structure reveals how it recognizes the Zika virus

    Quantum Computing Building Blocks

    Quantum Computing Building Blocks

    Scientists invented an approach to creating ordered patterns of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamonds, a promising approach to storing and computing quantum data.

    Loosening of Lignocellulose: Switchgrass and Success in Sugar Release

    Loosening of Lignocellulose: Switchgrass and Success in Sugar Release

    Using a genetically modified line of switchgrass, scientists reduced plant cell wall recalcitrance while increasing sugar release over three generations.

    Extending the Life of Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Extending the Life of Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Scientists offer new insights into how the source of electrons in batteries fails.

    Speeding Up Catalysts for Energy Storage

    Speeding Up Catalysts for Energy Storage

    Researchers develop the fastest synthetic catalyst for producing hydrogen gas, potentially leading to a new environmentally friendly, affordable fuel.

    Watching Neutrons Flow

    Watching Neutrons Flow

    Like water, neutrons seek their own level, and watching how they flow may teach us about how the chemical elements were made.

    FIONA to Take on the Periodic Table's Heavyweights

    FIONA to Take on the Periodic Table's Heavyweights

    FIONA (For the Identification Of Nuclide A) is a newly installed device designed to measure the mass numbers of individual atoms of heavy and superheavy elements. FIONA will let researchers learn about the shape and structure of heavy nuclei, guide the search for new elements, and offer better measurements for nuclear fission and related processes.

    Graphene Ribbons Result in 100-Fold Increase in Gold Catalyst's Performance

    Graphene Ribbons Result in 100-Fold Increase in Gold Catalyst's Performance

    Bottom-up synthesis of tunable carbon nanoribbons provides a new route to enhance industrial, automotive reactions.

    Breaking the Rules to Make Electricity from Waste Heat

    Breaking the Rules to Make Electricity from Waste Heat

    More atomic bonds is the key for performance in a newly discovered family of cage-structured compounds.

    New Class of Porous Materials Better Separates Carbon Dioxide from Other Gases

    New Class of Porous Materials Better Separates Carbon Dioxide from Other Gases

    Enhanced stability in the presence of water could help reduce smokestack emissions of greenhouse gases.

    Oxygen: The Jekyll and Hyde of Biofuels

    Oxygen: The Jekyll and Hyde of Biofuels

    Scientists are devising ways to protect plants, biofuels and, ultimately, the atmosphere itself from damage caused by an element that sustains life on earth.

    Electrifying Magnetism

    Electrifying Magnetism

    Researchers create materials with controllable electrical and magnetic properties, even at room temperature.

    One Step Closer to Practical Fast Charging Batteries

    One Step Closer to Practical Fast Charging Batteries

    Novel electrode materials have designed pathways for electrons and ions during the charge/discharge cycle.

    Discovering the Ultimate Limit of Heat Transport: Measurements across a Single-Atom Junction

    Discovering the Ultimate Limit of Heat Transport: Measurements across a Single-Atom Junction

    First observation of "quantum" heat transport uncovers the ultimate limits for nanoscale devices.

    Nothing Boring About the Thinnest Boron Ever

    Nothing Boring About the Thinnest Boron Ever

    Researchers made a sheet of boron only one atom thick with the potential to change solar panels, computers, and more.