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  • This map shows the part of the Crandall Canyon Mine that was being mined in August, 2007, when a collapse occurred. A smaller collapse in March 2007 (red rectangle marked
    University of Utah Seismograph Stations.
    This map shows the part of the Crandall Canyon Mine that was being mined in August, 2007, when a collapse occurred. A smaller collapse in March 2007 (red rectangle marked "March Damage") forced coal miners out of the north barrier pillar. Mining later resumed in the south part of the mine. The solid red rectangle marked "Aug 6 Collapse" represents the Mine Safety and Health Administration's original estimate of how much of the mine collapsed. A new study by University of Utah seismologists concludes the collapse covered an area four times larger, or 50 acres, represented by red-dashed rectangle. The new study also concludes the mine collapse's "hypocenter" -- the underground point (red star) where a seismic event begins -- was located very near where miners were working at the time of the collapse and near areas that had been mined during July and early August.
  • The Wasatch Plateau-Book Cliffs coal-mining area of central-eastern Utah is shown in this map. Epicenters of
    University of Utah Seismograph Stations.
    The Wasatch Plateau-Book Cliffs coal-mining area of central-eastern Utah is shown in this map. Epicenters of "seismic events" during almost 30 years are shown as red circles and yellow stars. Of the total 17,417 events, about 98 percent were induced by mining and less than 2 percent were natural earthquakes. One of the larger events, marked "August 6, 2007," was the tragic collapse in the Crandall Canyon Mine, which led to the deaths of six miners and three rescuers.
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