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Article ID: 709720

Scientists discover how Proteins interact along Metabolic Pathway

University of California San Diego

New research from scientists at the University of California San Diego and the University of Michigan has opened a new chapter in the story about what happens between two key metabolic enzymes, setting chemical biologists on their own path to a new understanding of fatty acid biosynthesis.

Released:
18-Mar-2019 3:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 709739

Study finds resurgence of malaria cases at the Ecuador-Peru border linked to the Venezuelan crisis

SUNY Upstate Medical University

As Ecuador and other South American countries receive influx of Venezuelan migrants, the public health sector struggles to control infectious disease epidemics, including malaria, presenting a regional public health threat. As a result, migrant populations and people living near border crossings are susceptible to these infectious diseases.

Released:
18-Mar-2019 12:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 709582

When is Best Time to Get Flu Shot? Pitt Analysis Compares Scenarios

Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

When flu season peaks after mid-winter, tens of thousands of influenza cases and hundreds of deaths can likely be avoided if older adults wait until October to get their flu immunization, a University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine analysis reveals.

Released:
14-Mar-2019 8:30 AM EDT

Article ID: 709613

Shield Diagnostics announces launch of Target-NG test for antibiotic susceptibility in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

Shield Diagnostics

Shield Diagnostics, an Andreessen Horowitz-backed clinical laboratory tackling antibiotic resistance by bringing precision medicine to infectious disease, announced the launch of Target-NG, a rapid molecular test for antibiotic susceptibility in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

Released:
14-Mar-2019 4:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 709596

UC San Diego Study Points to Virus-Related Acceleration in Some Cancers

University of California San Diego

While the human T- cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is known to cause a rare cancer of the immune system’s T-cells called adult T-cell leukemia or ATL in about five percent of those infected, researchers from the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) and Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego recently hypothesized that this virus, as well as another lesser-known “cousin” called bovine leukemia virus (BLV), may also play a role in the accelerated development of breast cancer, esophageal cancer, pancreatic cancer, and glioblastoma.

Released:
13-Mar-2019 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 709561

NYU College of Dentistry Awarded $2 Million NIH Grant to Study HIV Latency

New York University

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases awarded a grant to researchers at New York University College of Dentistry to study HIV latency. The grant provides nearly $2 million over five years to support research led by David N. Levy, PhD, associate professor of basic science and craniofacial biology at NYU Dentistry.

Released:
13-Mar-2019 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 709494

Advanced Biological Laboratories, Mayo Clinic Laboratories collaborate on test development to help patients with cytomegalovirus infection

Mayo Clinic

Advanced Biological Laboratories (ABL), S.A., a Luxembourg-based diagnostics company and leader in virology genotyping, and Mayo Clinic Laboratories have announced a collaboration. The two organizations are working together to develop a clinical test that will detect mutations associated with antiviral resistance in human cytomegalovirus.

Released:
12-Mar-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 709391

Winning the arms race: Analysis reveals key gene for bacterial infection

Osaka University

Osaka, Japan - To successfully infect their hosts, bacteria need to evade the host immune system in order to reproduce and spread. Over the course of evolution, hosts--such as humans--develop increasingly sophisticated defenses against bacterial infection, while bacteria in turn develop new strategies to overcome these defenses in a biological arms race.

Released:
11-Mar-2019 11:05 AM EDT

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