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Embargo will expire: 30-May-2022 4:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 26-May-2022 9:00 AM EDT

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Newswise: A Quarter of World's Internet Users Rely on Infrastructure at High Risk of Attack
Released: 26-May-2022 8:00 AM EDT
A Quarter of World's Internet Users Rely on Infrastructure at High Risk of Attack
University of California San Diego

About a quarter of the world’s Internet users live in countries that are more susceptible than previously thought to targeted attacks on their Internet infrastructure. Many of the at-risk countries are located in the Global South.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 1-Jun-2022 8:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 26-May-2022 8:00 AM EDT

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Newswise: A Nanoparticle and Inhibitor Trigger the Immune System, Outsmarting Brain Cancer
24-May-2022 10:05 AM EDT
A Nanoparticle and Inhibitor Trigger the Immune System, Outsmarting Brain Cancer
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Scientists at the University of Michigan fabricated a nanoparticle to deliver an inhibitor to brain tumor in mouse models, where the drug successfully turned on the immune system to eliminate the cancer. The process also triggered immune memory so that a reintroduced tumor was eliminated—a sign that this potential new approach could not only treat brain tumors but prevent or delay recurrences.

Released: 26-May-2022 7:30 AM EDT
An alarming prevalence of smell, taste loss during COVID’s delta surge
Ohio State University

The loss of smell and taste with a COVID-19 infection during the delta surge was a prevalent symptom and wasn’t prevented by vaccination, new research suggests. The study also found some people with the earliest COVID infections had loss of these senses months later and didn’t even realize it.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 26-May-2022 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 26-May-2022 7:05 AM EDT

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Released: 26-May-2022 6:05 AM EDT
Drugs Used to Treat Blood Cancer Could Activate “Sleeping” Cancer-Causing Gene
National University of Singapore

Hypomethylating agents (HMA) are currently used as a first-line treatment for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) - a group of disorders where there is insufficient production of healthy mature blood cells in the bone marrow - and increasingly in other diseases, but their mechanism of action remains unclear.

23-May-2022 12:45 PM EDT
More Young People Begin Recreational Cannabis Use Illegally in States that Legalize It
University of California San Diego

Once a state legalizes recreational cannabis and increase in youth using it illegally occurs, report researchers at University of California San Diego Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science.

Newswise:Video Embedded visual-system-brain-development-implicated-in-infants-who-develop-autism
VIDEO
24-May-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Visual System Brain Development Implicated in Infants who Develop Autism
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

For the first time, scientists have found that brain differences in the visual brain systems of infants who later are diagnosed with autism are associated with inherited genetic factors.

Newswise:Video Embedded sea-turtle-conservation-gets-boost-from-new-dna-detection-method
VIDEO
Released: 25-May-2022 7:00 PM EDT
Sea Turtle Conservation Gets Boost From New DNA Detection Method
University of Florida

A study led by University of Florida researchers is the first to sequence environmental DNA, or eDNA, from sea turtles — genetic material shed as they travel over beaches and in water. The research project is also the first to successfully collect animal eDNA from beach sand. The techniques could be used to trace and study other kinds of wildlife, advancing research and informing conservation strategies.

Newswise: Self-Powered Fabric Can Help Correct Posture in Real Time with the Help of Machine Learning
Released: 25-May-2022 5:55 PM EDT
Self-Powered Fabric Can Help Correct Posture in Real Time with the Help of Machine Learning
Tsinghua University Press

Posture is an important part of health. Prolonged poor posture, such as slouching or leaning to one side, can lead to pain and discomfort.

Newswise: Hot-blooded T. rex and cold-blooded Stegosaurus: chemical clues reveal dinosaur metabolisms
Released: 25-May-2022 5:50 PM EDT
Hot-blooded T. rex and cold-blooded Stegosaurus: chemical clues reveal dinosaur metabolisms
Field Museum

For decades, paleontologists have debated whether dinosaurs were warm-blooded, like modern mammals and birds, or cold-blooded, like modern reptiles.

Newswise: Researchers Identify Biomarker Panel That Could Help Predict Gestational Diabetes in Early Pregnancy
Released: 25-May-2022 5:35 PM EDT
Researchers Identify Biomarker Panel That Could Help Predict Gestational Diabetes in Early Pregnancy
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA researchers have taken the initial step in identifying what may be an effective way to detect gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) earlier in pregnancy, potentially improving diagnosis and treatment for what is the most common disorder of pregnancy.

Released: 25-May-2022 5:30 PM EDT
Protein nanoparticle vaccine shows potential for broader, safe SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, biomedical sciences researchers find
Georgia State University

A nanoparticle vaccine that combines two proteins that induce immune responses against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that has caused the global pandemic, has the potential to be developed into broader and safe SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, according to researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.

Released: 25-May-2022 5:15 PM EDT
Double agents: How stomach stem cells change allegiance upon injury
Institute of Molecular Biotechnology

A stomach adult stem cell population can fulfill two distinct functions: either help with digestion under normal conditions or take the lead on injury response.

Released: 25-May-2022 5:05 PM EDT
Newly discovered ancient Amazonian cities reveal how urban landscapes were built without harming nature
University of Exeter

A newly discovered network of “lost” ancient cities in the Amazon could provide a pivotal new insight into how ancient civilisations combined the construction of vast urban landscapes while living alongside nature.

Released: 25-May-2022 5:05 PM EDT
What a load of trash: New study finds UK litter is dominated by plastics and drinks packaging
Loughborough University

A new study looking at litter in the UK has revealed the types of materials and products being dumped in our hedgerows and waterways.

Newswise: Tiny Robotic Crab Is Smallest-Ever Remote-Controlled Walking Robot
Released: 25-May-2022 5:05 PM EDT
Tiny Robotic Crab Is Smallest-Ever Remote-Controlled Walking Robot
Northwestern University

Northwestern University engineers have developed the smallest-ever remote-controlled walking robot — and it comes in the form of a tiny, adorable peekytoe crab.

Released: 25-May-2022 4:45 PM EDT
Children and Adolescents Can Walk Efficiently at the Same Pace as Adults
Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH)

Ana Mateos and Jesús Rodríguez, scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), have published an experimental energy study in the American Journal of Biological Anthropology, which shows that children and adolescents can walk at a speed close to the optimal pace for adults, with hardly any locomotion energy costs or departing from their own optimal speed.

Released: 25-May-2022 4:35 PM EDT
Study shows that vaccinated individuals develop more robust and broadly reactive antibody responses against SARS-CoV-2 variants than the unvaccinated after an Omicron infection
University of Hong Kong

A recent study jointly conducted by the LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong (HKUMed) and the Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CU Medicine) shows that vaccinated individuals can develop more robust and broadly reactive antibody responses against SARS-CoV-2 variants than unvaccinated individuals after an Omicron infection.

Released: 25-May-2022 4:10 PM EDT
Fingerprinting Techniques to Identify Olive Oils
University of Barcelona

Olive oil is one of the most prestigious agri-foods in Spain and it is the base of the Mediterranean diet.

Newswise: Snake, Lizard T Cell Mystery
Released: 25-May-2022 4:05 PM EDT
Snake, Lizard T Cell Mystery
Flinders University

The intriguing Australian sleepy lizard has raised new questions about vertebrate immunity after the surprise discovery of the evolutionary disappearance of genes needed for some T cell production in squamates.

Released: 25-May-2022 4:05 PM EDT
New Discovery About Distant Galaxies: Stars Are Heavier Than We Thought
University of Copenhagen

A team of University of Copenhagen astrophysicists has arrived at a major result regarding star populations beyond the Milky Way.

20-May-2022 10:30 AM EDT
Does the Size of Air Pollution Particles Affect a Person’s Risk of Death from Stroke?
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Living in areas with higher air pollution is associated with an increased risk of in-hospital death from stroke, and the risk varies depending on the size of the air pollution particles, according to a new study published in the May 25, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

20-May-2022 10:30 AM EDT
Seven Healthy Habits Linked to Lower Risk of Dementia in Those with Genetic Risk
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Seven healthy habits and lifestyle factors may play a role in lowering the risk of dementia in people with the highest genetic risk, according to research published in the May 25, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Newswise: Danish Astrophysics Student Discovers Link Between Global Warming and Locally Unstable Weather
Released: 25-May-2022 3:50 PM EDT
Danish Astrophysics Student Discovers Link Between Global Warming and Locally Unstable Weather
University of Copenhagen

Climate change gives rise to more unstable weather, local droughts and extreme temperature records, but a coherent theory relating local and global climate is still under active development.

Newswise: On Mars, NASA's Perseverance Rover's Playlist Like No Other #ASA182
18-May-2022 8:05 AM EDT
On Mars, NASA's Perseverance Rover's Playlist Like No Other #ASA182
Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

After more than a year of recording on the surface, the team reduced the data to a Martian playlist that features about five hours of sounds.

Newswise: Some Monkeys Might Pull a Poker Face
Released: 25-May-2022 3:25 PM EDT
Some Monkeys Might Pull a Poker Face
Kyoto University

How could a human mother tell that her child is upset? Humans can distinguish the meanings of facial expressions of our fellow species either explicitly through speech or implicitly by context.

Released: 25-May-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Epigenetic markers predict complications in patients with type 2 diabetes
Lund University

A new study by researchers at Lund University in Sweden supports the notion that patients with type 2 diabetes patient should be divided into subgroups and given individualised treatment.

Released: 25-May-2022 2:30 PM EDT
Researchers Find New Mechanism to Turn on Cancer-Killing T Cells
University of Chicago Medical Center

In a new study, researchers at the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center and the University of Amsterdam have brought insight into one crucial step in the anti-cancer immune response process: T cell priming.

Released: 25-May-2022 2:25 PM EDT
Common Prostate Cancer Medications May Be Less Safe Than Previously Thought
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Men taking either of the two most common oral medications for advanced prostate cancer who had also undergone hormone therapy to treat their disease were at higher risk of serious metabolic or cardiovascular issues than patients who were only receiving hormone therapy, Michigan Medicine researchers found.

Newswise: Secrets of Tree Hyraxes in Kenya Uncovered with New Research Techniques
Released: 25-May-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Secrets of Tree Hyraxes in Kenya Uncovered with New Research Techniques
University of Helsinki

Tree hyraxes are medium-sized mammals living in the canopies of tropical forests. They are shy and only move at night, which is why next to nothing has been known about their living habits or behaviour so far.

19-May-2022 12:45 PM EDT
Breastfeeding duration associated with cognition
PLOS

Link between breastfeeding duration and cognitive test scores later in childhood persists even after controlling for socioeconomics and maternal intelligence.

18-May-2022 8:05 AM EDT
Turning Hearing Aids into Noise-Canceling Devices #ASA182
Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

For someone using an assistive listening device in a crowded place, it might make little difference whether the device is on or off. Nearby conversation directed at the user might be drowned out by distant conversation between other people, ambient noise from the environment, or music or speech piped through a loudspeaker system. Corey and his colleagues worked to eliminate at least one source of noise, the one emanating from loudspeakers or other broadcast systems.

Newswise: Is Excavated Soil and Rock a Waste? Sintering Utilization Says No
Released: 25-May-2022 1:35 PM EDT
Is Excavated Soil and Rock a Waste? Sintering Utilization Says No
Tsinghua University Press

Urban construction, especially the ongoing large-scale expansion and utilization of underground space, has resulted in massive excavated soil and rock (ESR) from buildings and subways.

Released: 25-May-2022 1:15 PM EDT
Why COVID Vaccines Are Deemed Non-Essential for UK Young Children
University of Huddersfield

Throughout the pandemic the University of Huddersfield’s Department of Pharmacy has been raising awareness on what vaccines are, how they are formulated, and why they're an important part of the healthcare strategy as well as the progress on further developments in COVID vaccines, so that people can make an educated decision on becoming vaccinated or if choosing for their children.

Newswise: Carnegie Mellon Roboticists go off road to compile data that could train self-driving ATVs
Released: 25-May-2022 1:05 PM EDT
Carnegie Mellon Roboticists go off road to compile data that could train self-driving ATVs
Carnegie Mellon University

Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University took an all-terrain vehicle on wild rides through tall grass, loose gravel and mud to gather data about how the ATV interacted with a challenging, off-road environment.

Newswise: Johns Hopkins Medicine Researchers Link Sugar-Studded Protein to Alzheimer’s Disease
Released: 25-May-2022 12:40 PM EDT
Johns Hopkins Medicine Researchers Link Sugar-Studded Protein to Alzheimer’s Disease
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they discovered that a special sugar molecule could play a key role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. If further research confirms the finding, the molecule, known as a glycan, could serve as a new target for early diagnostic tests, treatments and perhaps prevention of Alzheimer’s disease, say the researchers.

18-May-2022 7:05 AM EDT
Snap, Crackle, Pop: Healthy Coral Reefs Brimming with Noise #ASA182
Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Altogether, the hundreds of thousands of animals living in the reef sound like static on the radio, or the snap, crackle, and pop of a bowl of Rice Krispies as you pour milk on the cereal, when the coral reef is healthy. The sound changes for reefs that are not healthy, becoming quieter and less diverse.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 1-Jun-2022 5:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 25-May-2022 11:20 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 1-Jun-2022 5:00 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 25-May-2022 11:05 AM EDT
New Research Reveals How the Heart Repairs After a Heart Attack
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Immune response and the lymphatic system are central to cardiac repair after a heart attack, according to a study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago and Northwestern University Feinberg Cardiovascular Research Institute. These insights into the basic mechanisms of cardiac repair are the first step towards developing novel therapeutic approaches to preserve heart function. Findings were published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Released: 25-May-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Artificial Cilia Could Someday Power Diagnostic Devices
Cornell University

Cilia are the body’s diligent ushers. These microscopic hairs, which move fluid by rhythmic beating, are responsible for pushing cerebrospinal fluid in your brain, clearing the phlegm and dirt from your lungs, and keeping other organs and tissues clean.

24-May-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Neuroscientists Identify How the Brain Links Related Memories
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA scientists have discovered how the brain links memories and a way to restore this function in aging mice--as well as an FDA-approved drug that achieves the same thing. The Nature findings suggest a new method for combatting middle-aged memory loss.

23-May-2022 1:05 PM EDT
Long COVID Poses Risks to Vaccinated People, Too
Washington University in St. Louis

Vaccinated people with mild breakthrough COVID-19 infections can experience debilitating, lingering symptoms that affect the heart, brain, lungs and other parts of the body, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health Care System. However, a new study of more than 13 million veterans also found that vaccination against the virus that causes COVID-19 reduced the risk of death by 34% and the risk of getting long COVID-19 by 15%, compared with unvaccinated patients infected with the virus.

23-May-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Genetic roots of 3 mitochondrial diseases ID’d via new approach
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Wisconsin–Madison identified the genetic causes of three mitochondrial diseases by figuring out what dozens of poorly understood mitochondrial proteins do.

18-May-2022 7:05 AM EDT
Explosions Help Probe Elusive Atmospheric Waves #ASA182
Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Infrasound waves can probe some of the most complex weather patterns hidden to normal observations, but finding a powerful enough source of infrasound waves can be a challenge unless there is a munitions factory nearby.

Newswise: Species Thrive Through Social Connections
Released: 25-May-2022 10:50 AM EDT
Species Thrive Through Social Connections
Kyoto University

The term biodiversity invites images of lush rainforests, dynamic estuaries, and other biomes where a kaleidoscope of species interact within their communities. We could assume the same holds true for biodiversity at the microscopic level.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 1-Jun-2022 2:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 25-May-2022 10:25 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 1-Jun-2022 2:00 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: New Study: Longer Duration of Exclusive Breastfeeding Has Protective Effect on Childhood Asthma
Released: 25-May-2022 10:10 AM EDT
New Study: Longer Duration of Exclusive Breastfeeding Has Protective Effect on Childhood Asthma
American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)

A new study in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology shows that a longer period of exclusive breastfeeding was associated with decreased odds of current asthma.

Newswise: Kelp Mitigates Ocean Acidification, a Key to the Health and Abundance of Important Shellfish
Released: 25-May-2022 9:35 AM EDT
Kelp Mitigates Ocean Acidification, a Key to the Health and Abundance of Important Shellfish
Stony Brook University

A new study led by Christopher Gobler, PhD, and a team of scientists at the Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) shows that the presence of kelp significantly reduces ocean acidification, a result of climate change.


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