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Article ID: 705485

For These Critically Endangered Marine Turtles, Climate Change Could be a Knockout Blow

Florida State University

Researchers from FSU’s Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science suggest that projected increases in air temperatures, rainfall inundation and blistering solar radiation could significantly reduce hawksbill hatching success at a selection of major nesting beaches.

Released:
14-Dec-2018 11:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 705455

Parents’ brain activity ‘echoes’ their infant’s brain activity when they play together

PLOS

When infants are playing with objects, their early attempts to pay attention to things are accompanied by bursts of high-frequency activity in their brain. But what happens when parents play together with them? New research, publishing December 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, by Dr Sam Wass of the University of East London in collaboration with Dr Victoria Leong (Cambridge University and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore) and colleagues, shows for the first time that when adults are engaged in joint play together with their infant, their own brains show similar bursts of high-frequency activity. Intriguingly, these bursts of activity are linked to their baby’s attention patterns and not their own.

Released:
13-Dec-2018 3:25 PM EST
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Article ID: 705453

Genetically modified pigs resist infection with the classical swine fever virus

PLOS

Researchers have developed genetically modified pigs that are protected from classical swine fever virus (CSFV), according to a study published December 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Hongsheng Ouyang of Jilin University, and colleagues. As noted by the authors, these pigs offer potential benefits over commercial vaccination and could reduce economic losses related to classical swine fever.

Released:
13-Dec-2018 2:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    13-Dec-2018 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 704976

Control HIV by treating schistosomiasis, new study suggests

PLOS

Of the 34 million people worldwide with HIV, and the 200 million with schistosomiasis, the majority live in Africa— where millions of people are simultaneously infected with both diseases. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have shown that schistosomiasis infections are associated with increased HIV onward transmission, HIV acquisition in HIV negative women with urogenital schistosomiasis, and progression to death in HIV positive women.

Released:
5-Dec-2018 12:45 PM EST
Embargo will expire:
19-Dec-2018 2:00 PM EST
Released to reporters:
13-Dec-2018 11:05 AM EST

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Embargo will expire:
19-Dec-2018 11:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
13-Dec-2018 9:45 AM EST

EMBARGOED

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Embargo will expire:
19-Dec-2018 2:00 PM EST
Released to reporters:
12-Dec-2018 3:50 PM EST

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Pop Culture

Embargo will expire:
18-Dec-2018 2:00 PM EST
Released to reporters:
12-Dec-2018 3:05 PM EST

EMBARGOED

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  • Embargo expired:
    12-Dec-2018 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 705009

First-ever look at complete skeleton of Thylacoleo, Australia’s extinct “marsupial lion”

PLOS

Thyalacoleo carnifex, the “marsupial lion” of Pleistocene Australia, was an adept hunter that got around with the help of a strong tail, according to a study released December 12, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Roderick T. Wells of Flinders University and Aaron B. Camens of the South Australia Museum, Adelaide. These insights come after newly-discovered remains, including one nearly complete fossil specimen, allowed these researchers to reconstruct this animal’s entire skeleton for the first time.

Released:
5-Dec-2018 4:15 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    12-Dec-2018 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 705341

UK General Practitioners Skeptical That Artificial Intelligence Could Replace Them

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

In a UK-wide survey published in the journal PLOS ONE, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), and colleagues investigated primary care physicians’ views on AI’s looming impact on health professions.

Released:
12-Dec-2018 2:05 PM EST

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