Curated News:

PLoS One

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Channels:

zika, Chikungunya, Zika outbreak, Chikungunya outbreak, Public Health, predicting epidemics, Rainfall, mosquito-borne diseases

Rainfall Can Indicate That Mosquito-Borne Epidemics Will Occur Weeks Later

Aedes_aegypti_during_blood_meal.jpg

A new study demonstrates that outbreaks of mosquito-borne viruses Zika and Chikungunya generally occur about three weeks after heavy rainfall. Researchers also found that Chikungunya will predominate over Zika when both circulate at the same time.

Science

Channels:

Archeology, China, Eurasia, Fertile Crescent, Barley, Wheat, food globalization, Tibet, India, Domestication

Ancient Barley Took High Road to China, Changed to Summer Crop in Tibet

XinyiLiu200.jpg

First domesticated 10,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East, wheat and barley took vastly different routes to China, with barley switching from a winter to both a winter and summer crop during a thousand-year detour along the southern Tibetan Plateau, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis,

Medicine

Channels:

Rheumatoid Arthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis Drugs, Keck School Of Medicine Of Usc, University Of Southern California, Peptide, Research Results, Autoimmune Disease, RTD-1, Methotrexate, Etanercept, Primates

Old World Monkeys Could Be Key to a New, Powerful Rheumatoid Arthritis Therapy

RTD-1ribbonmodel.jpg

A study from the Keck School of Medicine of USC finds that a peptide only found in Old World monkeys has the potential to stop rheumatoid arthritis progression better than established treatments.

Medicine

Channels:

zika, Infectious Diseases, Pregnancy, Immunity, acquired immunity, PLoS Pathogens, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Study Raises Possibility of Naturally Acquired Immunity Against Zika Virus

Way_PLOSpath_Zikaplaque.jpg

Birth defects in babies born infected with Zika virus remain a major health concern. Now, scientists suggest the possibility that some women in high-risk Zika regions may already be protected and not know it. New research in PLOS Pathogens on Nov. 16, performed in mice, shows women who develop symptom-free Zika infections may be able to acquire immunity that would protect them from future infections and their offspring in a future pregnancy.

Medicine

Channels:

University of Vienna, Pavel Kovarik, Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL), Medical University of Vienna, Queen’s University Belfast, PLoS Pathogens, Natural Killer Cells, Superbug, Klebsiella, Multidrug Resistance, Human Health, Sepsis

Veni Vidi Vici: How Natural Killer Cells Conquer the Superbug Klebsiella

Kovarik_Pic_CreditNIAIDonFlickrCC2.0.jpg

Multidrug resistance of microbes poses a serious global threat to human health. Such resistant strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae significantly reduce therapeutic options for the treatment of Klebsiella-induced, potentially fatal pneumonia or sepsis. Pavel Kovarik and his team at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL), a joint venture of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna, together with colleagues at Queen’s University Belfast now report new insights into how immune cells communicate at the site of infection and join forces in the fight against Klebsiella infections. Their results, published in the journal PLOS Pathogens, might be used for the development of alternatives to ineffective anti-microbial drugs.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

UTEP, UTEP College of Science, cutaneous leishmaniasis, Biological Sciences, tropical diseases, Parasites, Vaccine, Rosa Maldonado, Ph.D., Igor Almeida, Ph.D.

UTEP Team Advances in Developing Vaccine for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

KatjaMichaelPh.D.EvaIniguezRosaMaldonadoPh.D.andIgorAlmeidaPh.D..jpg

A research team at The University of Texas at El Paso is one step closer to developing an effective human vaccine for cutaneous leishmaniasis, a tropical disease found in Texas and Oklahoma, and affecting some U.S. troops stationed in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Medicine

Channels:

Antibiotic Resistance, klebsiella pneumoniae, Microbiology, Immunology, Interferons

Queen’s Researchers Make Killer Superbug Breakthrough

AntibioticResistance.jpg

Researchers at Queen’s University Belfast together with the University of Vienna have discovered that treatment for the antibiotic resistant bacteria Klebsiella pneumoniae could lie within our bodies’ natural defences.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Computational Biology, Computational Biomedicine, Hypertension, Genomics

Using a Mathematical Lens to Look at Disease as a Whole Body Problem

wholebodydiseasegenomevadigepalli.jpg

A novel computational method allows researchers to parse how multiple organs contribute to a disease over time, giving a more holistic view of disease and potentially revealing new avenues for intervention.

Science

Channels:

Nutrition & Children, Developing Countries, Vitamin A, Vitamin E, Blindness, Potatoes

“Golden” Potato Delivers Bounty of Vitamins A and E

An experimental “golden” potato could hold the power to prevent disease and death in developing countries where residents rely heavily upon the starchy food for sustenance, new research suggests. A serving of the yellow-orange lab-engineered potato has the potential to provide as much as 42 percent of a child’s recommended daily intake of vitamin A and 34 percent of a child’s recommended intake of vitamin E, according to a recent study co-led by researchers at The Ohio State University.

Science

Channels:

University of Vienna, Alice Auersperg, Cornelia Habl, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Goffin cockatoo, NUT, tool-use, cognitive biologists, Parrot

The Key to a Nut

The Goffin's cockatoo is not a specialised tool user in the wild but has shown the capacity to invent and use different types of tools in captivity. Now cognitive biologists from the University of Vienna and the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna tested these parrots in a tool use task, requiring the birds to move objects in relation to a surface. The animals had to choose the correct "key" to insert into a "keyhole" in a box, aligning its shape to the shape of a surface cutout inside the box during insertion. The parrots were not only able to select the correct key but also required fewer placement attempts to align simple shapes than primates in a similar study.







Chat now!