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Embargo will expire:
24-Jan-2019 2:00 PM EST
Released to reporters:
17-Jan-2019 4:35 PM EST

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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Jan-2019 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706305

Blocking Hormone Uptake Burns More Fat

PLOS

A newly discovered regulatory mechanism helps the body control the rate of fat metabolism, according to a new study publishing on January 17 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Ligong Chen of Tsinghua University in Beijing and colleagues. The finding may lead to new drugs to help burn stored fat and reduce weight.

Released:
10-Jan-2019 12:05 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    17-Jan-2019 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706555

First Clinical Study Shows Mavoglurant Improves Eye Gaze Behavior in Fragile X Syndrome Patients

Rush University Medical Center

Researchers at Rush University Medical Center and the MIND Institute at UC Davis have found that mavoglurant, an experimental drug known as an mGluR5 negative modulator, can positively modify a key characteristic behavior in individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS).

Released:
15-Jan-2019 6:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Jan-2019 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706556

Experimental Drug Improves Eye Gaze Behavior in Fragile X Syndrome

UC Davis MIND Institute

Researchers at MIND Institute at UC Davis and Rush University Medical Center have found that mavoglurant, an experimental drug known as an mGluR5 negative modulator, can positively modify a key characteristic behavior in individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS).

Released:
15-Jan-2019 6:05 PM EST
Embargo will expire:
23-Jan-2019 2:00 PM EST
Released to reporters:
16-Jan-2019 4:50 PM EST

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 23-Jan-2019 2:00 PM EST

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Article ID: 706614

New AI can detect urinary tract infections

University of Surrey

New AI developed at the University of Surrey could identify and help reduce one of the top causes of hospitalisation for people living with dementia: urinary tract infections (UTI).

Released:
16-Jan-2019 2:50 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jan-2019 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706304

Many endangered marine mammals and sea turtles are recovering after Endangered Species Act protection

PLOS

More than three-quarters of marine mammal and sea turtle populations have significantly increased after listing of the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA), according to a study published January 16 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Abel Valdivia of the Center for Biological Diversity in California, and colleagues. The findings suggest that conservation measures such as tailored species management and fishery regulations, in addition to other national and international measures, appear to have been largely successful in promoting species recovery, leading to the delisting of some species and to increases in most populations.

Released:
10-Jan-2019 11:50 AM EST
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Article ID: 706559

Smartphones: are they just a pain in the neck?

University of South Australia

A large majority of the world’s 3.4 billion smartphone users are putting their necks at risk every time they send a text, according to new research involving the University of South Australia.

Released:
15-Jan-2019 8:05 PM EST

Article ID: 706531

Difficulties with audiovisual processing contributes to dyslexia in children

University at Buffalo

A University at Buffalo psychologist has published a neuroimaging study that could help develop tests for early identification of dyslexia.

Released:
15-Jan-2019 3:05 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    15-Jan-2019 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706154

Back to the future with CD4 testing: improving HIV care in low- and middle-income countries

PLOS

A practical resource-based public health approach for the rapid initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected individuals living in low- and middle-income countries could save thousands of lives, according to an Essay published January 15 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Mark Tenforde of the University of Washington School of Medicine, and colleagues.

Released:
8-Jan-2019 2:00 PM EST

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