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Released: 1-Oct-2020 2:50 PM EDT
UC San Diego Partners with San Ysidro Health to Expand COVID-19 Testing
University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, in collaboration with local partners, have been awarded a $5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to implement a program of widespread testing for COVID-19 in San Ysidro, focused on pregnant women and children.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 2:35 PM EDT
Being a selfish jerk doesn’t get you ahead, research finds
University of California, Berkeley Haas School of Business

The evidence is in: Nice guys and gals don’t finish last, and being a selfish jerk doesn’t get you ahead.

Newswise: Promising COVID-19 Rapid Test Technology Enters Phase 1 of NIH Challenge
Released: 1-Oct-2020 2:25 PM EDT
Promising COVID-19 Rapid Test Technology Enters Phase 1 of NIH Challenge
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

A promising new COVID-19 rapid-testing technology platform developed by Rover Diagnostics and Columbia Engineering has been selected by the NIH to enter Phase 1 of the RADx initiative to support new COVID-19 testing technologies. The affordable, portable, and ultrafast point-of-care Rover platform provides reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction results in eight minutes, faster than any other test of its kind, with targeted accuracy to match laboratory-based tests.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 2:20 PM EDT
Canisius College Class Ring - Lost 45 Years Ago - Returned to Its Owner
Canisius College

Some things defy all odds. It was nearly 45 years ago when Canisius College alumnus (Ret.) Lt. Col. James McNicholas lost his class ring somewhere outside his home in El Paso, TX, where he was stationed with the U.S. Army. The ring never turned up. Until recently.

30-Sep-2020 10:30 AM EDT
Researchers call for loss of smell to be recognized globally as a symptom of COVID-19
PLOS

Four out of five people experiencing the recent loss of smell and/or taste tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies—and of those who tested positive, 40 percent did not have cough or fever, reports a new study in PLOS Medicine by Prof. Rachel Batterham at University College London and colleagues.

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VIDEO
28-Sep-2020 4:55 PM EDT
How Cells Build Organisms
Harvard Medical School

Harvard scientists discovered a key control mechanism that cells use to self-organize in early embryonic development. The findings shed light on a process fundamental to multicellular life and open new avenues for improved tissue and organ engineering .

Newswise: Building an antiracist lab: Scientists offer steps to take action now
30-Sep-2020 1:00 PM EDT
Building an antiracist lab: Scientists offer steps to take action now
DePaul University

“Ten simple rules for building an antiracist lab,” is the subject of a paper by scientists at DePaul University in Chicago and the University of California in Merced. The paper is published Oct. 1 in the journal PLOS Computational Biology.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 1:55 PM EDT
There is no evidence to support claims that the ballots were disposed of by mail carriers in Pennsylvania
Newswise

Diamond and Silk—the former Fox Nation online personalities, claim that the recently discovered nine discarded ballots in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania were tossed out by anti-Trump United States Postal Service mail carriers. The pair shared the article on social media where it received thousands of likes and shares.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 1:35 PM EDT
COVID vs. Flu vs. Common Cold: What You Need to Know
Children's Hospital Los Angeles

With cold and flu season underway, plus the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, infectious disease specialist Jeffrey Bender, MD, shares how to tell the difference between the three illnesses, and the most important thing parents can do to keep children safe.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 1:35 PM EDT
UB awarded grant to help pharmacies build community health worker programs
University at Buffalo

University at Buffalo researchers have received a grant from the Community Pharmacy Foundation to help add community health workers to pharmacies to better connect patients to critical services and lower health care costs.

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Released: 1-Oct-2020 1:20 PM EDT
Population distribution can greatly impact COVID-19 spread, UCI-led study finds
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., Oct. 1, 2020 — Uneven population distribution can significantly impact the severity and timing of COVID-19 infections within a city or county, leading individual communities to have vastly different experiences with the pandemic, according to a recent study led by the University of California, Irvine. Findings published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences show that the heterogeneous spatial features of interpersonal connections may produce dramatic local variations in exposures to those with the illness.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 1:15 PM EDT
Arizona State University researchers awarded $4.7M by NIH to expand COVID-19 testing in underserved Arizona communities
Arizona State University (ASU)

In Arizona, as in other parts of the country, data shows that COVID-19 has disproportionately affected the American Indian, African American and Latinx communities, as well as other vulnerable populations. A $4.7 million grant from the National Institute of Health to ASU’s Southwest Interdisciplinary Research Center (SIRC) is on the way to help address this by funding a rapid and large-scale increase in COVID-19 testing of underserved communities across Arizona.

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Released: 1-Oct-2020 12:55 PM EDT
High risk of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients with COVID-19
Medical University of Vienna (MedUni Wien)

In a systematic review of the worldwide published data on "Venous thromboembolism (VTE) in COVID-19 patients", Cihan Ay, Stephan Nopp, and Florian Moik from the Department of Medicine I, Clinical Division of Haematology and Haemostaseology, now for the first time, provide an in-depth analysis on the risk of VTE in patients hospitalised for COVID-19.

Newswise: Study reveals element in blood is part of human — and hibernating squirrel — stress response
Released: 1-Oct-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Study reveals element in blood is part of human — and hibernating squirrel — stress response
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

A new study published in the journal Critical Care Explorations shows for the first time that part of the stress response in people and animals involves increasing the levels of a naturally circulating element in blood. The discovery demonstrates a biological mechanism that rapidly responds to severe physiologic stress and potentially serves to protect us from further damage due to life-threatening conditions.

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Embargo will expire: 5-Oct-2020 10:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 1-Oct-2020 12:30 PM EDT

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access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 5-Oct-2020 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 1-Oct-2020 12:25 PM EDT

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Newswise: MSU, USDA Agricultural Research Service celebrate new partnership, “Atlas” supercomputer housed in Starkville
Released: 1-Oct-2020 12:25 PM EDT
MSU, USDA Agricultural Research Service celebrate new partnership, “Atlas” supercomputer housed in Starkville
Mississippi State University

Building on decades of successful collaborations, Mississippi State University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service celebrated the new “Atlas” supercomputer Wednesday [Sept. 30] with a virtual event.

Newswise: Ecological Restoration Institute to lead new center aimed at building a skilled workforce to help with forest management
Released: 1-Oct-2020 12:15 PM EDT
Ecological Restoration Institute to lead new center aimed at building a skilled workforce to help with forest management
Northern Arizona University

Northern Arizona University forestry professor Han-Sup Han is leading the creation of the Forest Operations Training Center, which aims to make use of abundant forest resources in Coconino County, the need to properly manage those forests and the need for workers who are trained in the necessary skillsets.

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Released: 1-Oct-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Why writing by hand makes kids smarter
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

Professor Audrey van der Meer at NTNU believes that national guidelines should be put into place to ensure that children receive at least a minimum of handwriting training.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 6-Oct-2020 2:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 1-Oct-2020 11:55 AM EDT

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Released: 1-Oct-2020 11:50 AM EDT
Fact-checking Trump's Claim that Mail-in Ballots Will Lead to a ‘Rigged’ Election
Newswise

In the first debate between incumbant President Donald Trump and the Democratic nominee, Former Vice President Joe Biden, Trump reiterated that mail-in ballots lead to voter fraud and will lead to a rigged election. This claim is false. There is no evidence that mail-in ballots are rigging the election. "Unsolicited" mail-in ballots have been used for years in several states, with little to no evidence of voter fraud.

Newswise: Student Receives Health Policy Research Scholars Fellowship
Released: 1-Oct-2020 11:50 AM EDT
Student Receives Health Policy Research Scholars Fellowship
Rutgers School of Public Health

Grace Ibitamuno, a MD/PhD student at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and Rutgers School of Public Health, has received the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Research Scholars Fellowship to support her work advancing health equity.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 11:40 AM EDT
Vanderbilt University Medical Center to Acquire Tennova Shelbyville and Tullahoma Hospitals from Community Health Systems, Inc., and Partner with Tennova Clarksville Hospital
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Leaders of Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) today announced plans to purchase Tennova Healthcare-Shelbyville and Tennova Healthcare-Harton hospitals from subsidiaries of Community Health Systems, Inc. (CHS). At the same time, VUMC will acquire minority ownership in CHS’s Tennova Healthcare-Clarksville hospital.

Newswise: New material senses neurotransmitters in the brain
Released: 1-Oct-2020 11:35 AM EDT
New material senses neurotransmitters in the brain
Argonne National Laboratory

Scientists have developed a new material that can sense glutamate in the brain, and may lead to new tools to combat neurological disorders.

Newswise: France Córdova Named Founding Chair of AIP Foundation, Will Help American Institute of Physics Reach Ambitious Goals, New Levels of Impact
Released: 1-Oct-2020 11:20 AM EDT
France Córdova Named Founding Chair of AIP Foundation, Will Help American Institute of Physics Reach Ambitious Goals, New Levels of Impact
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

France Córdova, former director of the National Science Foundation, NASA chief scientist, and president of Purdue University, has been appointed as the first chair of the newly formed AIP Foundation. The Foundation was established to support the charitable, scientific, and educational mission of the American Institute of Physics by amplifying philanthropic support of the Institute, bolstering and innovating funding models for AIP programs and activities and supporting the Institute’s overarching strategy of advancing the physical sciences with a unifying voice of strength from diversity.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 11:15 AM EDT
One year out, cancer center countdown to applying for NCI comprehensive status kicks into high gear
University of Kansas Cancer Center

In one year, The University of Kansas Cancer Center will submit its application to renew its prestigious National Cancer Institute (NCI) designation in the hopes of attaining “comprehensive” status, the NCI’s highest ranking.

Newswise: Rounds with Leadership: Combating Racism and Cultivating Inclusion
Released: 1-Oct-2020 11:10 AM EDT
Rounds with Leadership: Combating Racism and Cultivating Inclusion
American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN)

At a time when our nation is struggling to address systemic racism and the inequities that have long plagued communities of color, it is truly unsettling to see the recent Executive Order on Combating Race and Sex Stereotyping, which calls for restrictions on diversity training offered at federal agencies.

Newswise: Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine Dean Bonita Stanton Named to NJBIZ ‘Power 50 for Education’
Released: 1-Oct-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine Dean Bonita Stanton Named to NJBIZ ‘Power 50 for Education’
Hackensack Meridian Health

Bonita Stanton, the founding dean of the Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, was named to NJBIZ’s “Power 50 for Education.”

30-Sep-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Mud-slurping chinless ancestors had all the moves
University of Bristol

A team of researchers, led by the University of Bristol, has revealed our most ancient ancestors were ecologically diverse, despite lacking jaws and paired fins.

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Embargo will expire: 5-Oct-2020 4:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 1-Oct-2020 10:45 AM EDT

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Newswise: Using Machine Learning to Predict Pediatric Brain Injury
Released: 1-Oct-2020 10:40 AM EDT
Using Machine Learning to Predict Pediatric Brain Injury
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Oct. 1, 2020 – When newborn babies or children with heart or lung distress are struggling to survive, doctors often turn to a form of life support that uses artificial lungs. This treatment, called Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO), has been credited with saving countless lives. But in some cases, it can also lead to long-term brain injury.

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Embargo will expire: 1-Oct-2020 4:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 1-Oct-2020 10:40 AM EDT

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Released: 1-Oct-2020 10:35 AM EDT
Study finds women want more information from religious hospitals on their reproductive care restrictions
University of Chicago Medical Center

Religious hospital policies that restrict reproductive health care are poorly understood by patients, according to new bioethics research from UChicago Medicine.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 10:25 AM EDT
UChicago Medicine, in partnership with Solis Mammography, opens two new breast health centers
University of Chicago Medical Center

Solis Mammography, the nation’s largest independent provider of breast health and diagnostic services, is expanding access to 3D mammography and diagnostic breast health procedures through a partnership with University of Chicago Medicine.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 10:10 AM EDT
Sickness doesn’t fight fair. Neither do we.
University of Chicago Medical Center

The University of Chicago Medicine launched a new brand marketing campaign that highlights the academic health system’s commitment to advancing healthcare and its relentless quest to finding answers to the most difficult medical problems that patients face.

Newswise:Video Embedded hubble-watches-exploding-star-fade-into-oblivion
VIDEO
Released: 1-Oct-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Hubble Watches Exploding Star Fade into Oblivion
Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

Hubble Space Telescope images have been assembled into a time-lapse video of an exploding star fading into oblivion inside a distant galaxy. The video compresses one-year's worth of observations into seconds. When it exploded the supernova was as bright as 5 billion Suns.

Newswise: UI Health performs first-ever robotic kidney transplant for patient with polycystic kidney disease
Released: 1-Oct-2020 10:00 AM EDT
UI Health performs first-ever robotic kidney transplant for patient with polycystic kidney disease
University of Illinois at Chicago

Surgeons at UI Health — the University of Illinois Chicago’s clinical and academic health enterprise — have performed the world’s first robotic-assisted double-kidney removal followed immediately by a living-donor kidney transplant in a patient with severe polycystic kidney disease.

Newswise: Zika infections drastically underreported during 2015 epidemic
Released: 1-Oct-2020 9:55 AM EDT
Zika infections drastically underreported during 2015 epidemic
University of Notre Dame

More than 100 million infections of Zika virus within Central and South America and the Caribbean went undetected between 2015 and 2018, according to a new study.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 9:40 AM EDT
Scientists at Texas Biomed develop new tool to aid in the development of SARS-CoV-2 antivirals and vaccines
Texas Biomedical Research Institute

Researchers apply a novel reverse genetics approach to create recombinant SARS-CoV-2San Antonio, Texas (October 1, 2020) – Researchers at Texas Biomedical Research Institute (Texas Biomed) recently published findings from an innovative SARS-CoV-2 study that will assist in the development of new vaccines and antivirals for COVID-19.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 9:30 AM EDT
COVID-19 Study Retractions Drive Research Transparency Partnership and Push for Increased Publication of Negative/Null Findings
Wolters Kluwer Health

Together, The Center for Biomedical Research Transparency (CBMRT), the American Heart Association (AHA) and Wolters Kluwer continue to address the issue of publication bias – and the importance of publishing research with negative findings – by launching the Null Hypothesis Initiative for all of the AHA's 12 peer-reviewed, scientific research journals.

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Released: 1-Oct-2020 9:30 AM EDT
Niagara Falls ‘Miracle’ Baby Beats Aggressive Leukemia After Successful CAR-T Cancer Immunotherapy in Buffalo
Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

“She’s a bundle of joy, she’s a blessing. She’s just life.” That’s what Cariorl Mayfield of Niagara Falls, NY, says about his young daughter, Chastity, a year after she went through a complex series of therapies at the Roswell Park Oishei Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Program to treat the leukemia she was diagnosed with at only 5 weeks old.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 8:50 AM EDT
Benefits manager policy disrupts patient-physician decision making for breast and prostate cancer radiation treatments
American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO)

Radiation oncologists today expressed serious concerns about a new private insurance coverage policy that could undermine patient-centered care for two of the most common cancers in the United States. Leaders of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) urge eviCore, a radiation oncology benefits management company, to halt and make meaningful changes to a new policy for radiation therapy coverage. Under the new policy, EviCore mandates that most breast and prostate cancer treatments use a shorter, hypofractionated radiation therapy regimen even if it runs counter to a physician’s clinical recommendation.

Newswise: Rutgers Cancer Institute Research: Breastfeeding is Safe for Breast Cancer Survivors of Reproductive Age
Released: 1-Oct-2020 8:40 AM EDT
Rutgers Cancer Institute Research: Breastfeeding is Safe for Breast Cancer Survivors of Reproductive Age
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Is breastfeeding safe and possible for mothers who have a history of breast cancer? Investigators at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey recently explored this question by conducting a systematic review on the feasibility and challenges of breastfeeding among breast cancer survivors of reproductive age.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 8:40 AM EDT
Two molecular handshakes for hearing
Ohio State University

Scientists have mapped and simulated filaments in the inner ear at the atomic level, a discovery that shed lights on how the inner ear works and that could help researchers learn more about how and why people lose the ability to hear.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 8:20 AM EDT
The GovLab and the IDB bring innovative ideas to Latin American government officials
New York University

The Governance Lab at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) share the results of the first two “Smarter Crowdsourcing in the Age of Coronavirus” online sessions

Newswise: Edward M. Barksdale, Jr., MD, named president-elect of the American Pediatric Surgery Association
Released: 1-Oct-2020 8:20 AM EDT
Edward M. Barksdale, Jr., MD, named president-elect of the American Pediatric Surgery Association
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

Edward M. Barksdale, Jr., MD, Surgeon-in-Chief at University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital (UH Rainbow), has been named president-elect of the American Pediatric Surgery Association (APSA). Dr. Barksdale will be APSA’s 53rd President, and will begin his one year term of service in May 2021.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 8:15 AM EDT
How (and Why) Steak-umm Became a Social Media Phenomenon During the Pandemic
North Carolina State University

A new study outlines how a brand of frozen meat products took social media by storm – and what other brands can learn from the phenomenon.

Newswise: The Medical Minute: Planning ahead for a potential emergency department visit
Released: 1-Oct-2020 8:15 AM EDT
The Medical Minute: Planning ahead for a potential emergency department visit
Penn State Health

Medical emergencies, by their nature, come with very little or no warning. While any injury or illness that requires a trip to the emergency department will likely cause distress, putting an action plan in place now can help minimize the anxiety and fear of a future visit.


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