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Newswise: Here, There and Everywhere: Large and Giant Viruses Abound Globally

Here, There and Everywhere: Large and Giant Viruses Abound Globally

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

In Nature, a team led by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) researchers uncovered a broad diversity of large and giant viruses that belong to the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV) supergroup, expanding virus diversity in this group 10-fold from just 205 genomes.

Channels: Environmental Health, Environmental Science, Infectious Diseases, Microbiome, Public Health, West Nile Virus, Zika Virus, Nature (journal), DOE Science News, All Journal News,

Released:
23-Jan-2020 2:25 PM EST
Newswise: High-Protein Diets Boost Artery-Clogging Plaque, Mouse Study Shows

High-Protein Diets Boost Artery-Clogging Plaque, Mouse Study Shows

Washington University in St. Louis

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis reveals how high-protein diets increase atherosclerosis, especially unstable plaque that increases the risk of a heart attack.

Channels: Cardiovascular Health, Heart Disease, Nutrition, Obesity, Weight Loss, Nature (journal), All Journal News,

Released:
23-Jan-2020 1:40 PM EST
Research Results
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Adrenaline Handbrake

Harvard Medical School

Researchers have solved the long-standing mystery of how adrenaline regulates a key class of membrane proteins that are responsible for initiating the contraction of heart cells. The findings provide a mechanistic description of how adrenaline stimulates the heart and present new targets for cardiovascular drug discovery, including the potential development of alternative therapeutics to beta-blockers.

Channels: All Journal News, Cardiovascular Health, Cell Biology, Pharmaceuticals, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Nature (journal),

Released:
23-Jan-2020 12:05 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: For now, river deltas gain land worldwide

For now, river deltas gain land worldwide

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Researchers from Utrecht University in the Netherlands, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), and colleagues found that delta areas worldwide have actually gained land in the past 30 years, despite river damming. However, recent land gains are unlikely to last throughout the 21st century due to expected, accelerated sea level rise. The researchers published their findings in the journal Nature.

Channels: Environmental Science, Geology, Nature, All Journal News, Nature (journal),

Released:
23-Jan-2020 10:25 AM EST
Research Results
  • Embargo expired:
    23-Jan-2020 5:00 AM EST

New Drug Target for Prostate Cancer Found in the Non-Coding Genome

University Health Network (UHN)

Scientists at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have identified the drivers of a crucial gene involved in prostate cancer, revealing new targets for drug design.

Channels: Cancer, Healthcare, Men's Health, Pharmaceuticals, Cell Biology, Genetics, Nature (journal), All Journal News,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 5:55 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Global river deltas increasingly shaped by humans, study says

Global river deltas increasingly shaped by humans, study says

Tulane University

The study by current and former researchers at Tulane University looked at nearly every delta in the world.

Channels: Environmental Science, Geology, Nature, Nature (journal), All Journal News,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 3:15 PM EST
Research Results
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Chemistry finding could make solar energy more efficient

Ohio State University

Scientists for the first time have developed a single molecule that can absorb sunlight efficiently and also act as a catalyst to transform solar energy into hydrogen, a clean alternative to fuel for things like gas-powered vehicles. This new molecule collects energy from the entire visible spectrum, and can harness more than 50% more solar energy than current solar cells can. The finding could help humans transition away from fossil fuels and toward energy sources that do not contribute to climate change.

Channels: Chemistry, Climate Science, DOE Science News, Energy, Nature (journal), All Journal News,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 3:05 PM EST
Research Results
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Nature Study: First Ancient DNA from West Africa Illuminates the Deep Human Past

Saint Louis University

The research team sequenced DNA from four children buried 8,000 and 3,000 years ago at Shum Laka in Cameroon, a site excavated by a Belgian and Cameroonian team 30 years ago. The findings, “Ancient West African foragers in the context of African population history," published Jan. 22 in Nature, represent the first ancient DNA from West or Central Africa, and some of the oldest DNA recovered from an African tropical context.

Channels: All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology, History, African News, Nature (journal),

Released:
22-Jan-2020 2:20 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: First Ancient DNA from West and Central Africa Illuminates Deep Human Past
  • Embargo expired:
    22-Jan-2020 1:00 PM EST

First Ancient DNA from West and Central Africa Illuminates Deep Human Past

Harvard Medical School

An international team led by Harvard Medical School scientists has produced the first genome-wide ancient human DNA sequences from west and central Africa.

Channels: Archaeology and Anthropology, History, Nature (journal), African News, Evolution and Darwin, Genetics, Staff Picks,

Released:
17-Jan-2020 1:00 PM EST
Research Results
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Jan-2020 1:00 PM EST

Researchers Reverse HIV Latency, Important Scientific Step Toward Cure

University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Overcoming HIV latency – activating HIV in CD4+ T cells that lay dormant – is a needed step toward a cure. Scientists at UNC-Chapel Hill, Emory University, and Qura Therapeutics – a partnership between UNC and ViiV Healthcare – showed it’s possible to drive HIV out of latency in two animal models.

Channels: AIDS and HIV, Blood, Healthcare, Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Pharmaceuticals, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), Nature (journal), All Journal News,

Released:
21-Jan-2020 11:10 AM EST
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