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Article ID: 705504

Research suggests path to vaccine or drug for late-onset Alzheimer’s

UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern researchers have succeeded in neutralizing what they believe is a primary factor in late-onset Alzheimer’s disease, opening the door to development of a drug that could be administered before age 40, and taken for life, to potentially prevent the disease in 50 to 80 percent of at-risk adults.

Released:
14-Dec-2018 2:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    14-Dec-2018 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 705431

An exceptional surgical intervention

Universite de Montreal

Thanks to the efforts of a pediatric medical team at CHU Sainte-Justine in Montreal, a 2-year-old girl suffering from an extreme form of hydrocephalus may someday lead a more normal life.

Released:
13-Dec-2018 12:05 PM EST

Article ID: 705437

Ritalin drives greater connection between brain areas key to memory, attention

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Luis Populin and UW–Madison collaborators published a study this week in the Journal of Neuroscience describing increased connections between key parts of the brains of monkeys who have taken methylphenidate (Ritalin).

Released:
13-Dec-2018 4:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 705455

Parents’ brain activity ‘echoes’ their infant’s brain activity when they play together

PLOS

When infants are playing with objects, their early attempts to pay attention to things are accompanied by bursts of high-frequency activity in their brain. But what happens when parents play together with them? New research, publishing December 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, by Dr Sam Wass of the University of East London in collaboration with Dr Victoria Leong (Cambridge University and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore) and colleagues, shows for the first time that when adults are engaged in joint play together with their infant, their own brains show similar bursts of high-frequency activity. Intriguingly, these bursts of activity are linked to their baby’s attention patterns and not their own.

Released:
13-Dec-2018 3:25 PM EST
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Article ID: 705447

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Announces Endowed Chair in Pediatric Neuroblastoma Research

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Pediatric oncologist and researcher Yael Mossé, MD, Director of the Neuroblastoma Development Therapeutics Program at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, has been named the inaugural holder of the Patricia Brophy Endowed Chair in Neuroblastoma Research.

Released:
13-Dec-2018 2:40 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    13-Dec-2018 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 705380

Researchers uncover molecular mechanisms linked to autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Two studies have linked DNA changes to their molecular effects in the brain, revealing new mechanisms for psychiatric diseases. The findings provide a roadmap for developing a new generation of therapies for conditions like autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

Released:
12-Dec-2018 6:00 PM EST
Embargo will expire:
17-Dec-2018 11:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
13-Dec-2018 12:05 PM EST

EMBARGOED

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Article ID: 705363

In Mice, Johns Hopkins Researchers Find the Cause of and Cure for Brain Injury Associated With Gut Condition in Preemies

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Using a mouse model of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) — a potentially fatal condition that causes a premature infant’s gut to suddenly die — researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have uncovered the molecular causes of the condition and its associated brain injury. The discovery enabled the team to combine efforts with colleagues studying brain inflammation and to identify potential drugs that reverse the brain injury in mice.

Released:
13-Dec-2018 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 705406

Researchers identify widespread brain alterations in children with callousness

Elsevier

Children with elevated levels of callous traits—such as a lack of remorse and disregard for other people’s feelings—show widespread differences in brain structure compared with children with lower levels of the traits, according to a new study published in Biological Psychiatry. The differences, which included large- and small-scale structural alterations, support the idea of callous traits as a neurodevelopmental condition.

Released:
13-Dec-2018 11:10 AM EST
Embargo will expire:
17-Dec-2018 11:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
13-Dec-2018 11:05 AM EST

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 17-Dec-2018 11:00 AM EST

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.


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