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  • Embargo expired:
    28-Mar-2018 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 691792

Decade of Fossil Collecting in Africa Gives New Perspective on Triassic Period, Emergence of Dinosaurs

University of Washington

A project spanning countries, years and institutions has attempted to reconstruct what the southern end of the world looked like during the Triassic period, 252 to 199 million years ago.

Released:
27-Mar-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    13-Mar-2018 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 690946

Fossils Found of Giant Flying Creatures Wiped Out with the Dinosaurs

University of Portsmouth

Fossils of six new species of pterosaurs, giant flying reptiles that flew over the heads of the dinosaurs, have been discovered by a team of researchers.

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12-Mar-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    12-Feb-2018 3:00 PM EST

Article ID: 689335

Middle Earth Preserved in Giant Bird Dung

University of Adelaide

While the giant birds that once dominated New Zealand are all extinct, a study of their preserved dung (coprolites) has revealed many aspects of their ancient ecosystem, with important insights for ongoing conservation efforts.

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12-Feb-2018 8:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 688041

Why Don’t Turtles Still Have Tail Spikes?

North Carolina State University

In a study covering 300 million years of evolutionary history, researchers from North Carolina State University and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences found four necessary components to tail weapon development: size, armor, herbivory and thoracic stiffness.

Released:
17-Jan-2018 10:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 687981

University of Arkansas Scientists Digitally Preserve Important Arkansas Dinosaur Tracks

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

University of Arkansas researchers used LiDAR imaging to digitally preserve and study important dinosaur tracks.

Released:
16-Jan-2018 12:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    11-Jan-2018 7:00 AM EST

Article ID: 687727

New Turkey-Sized Dinosaur From Australia Preserved in an Ancient Log-Jam

PeerJ

The partial skeleton of a new species of turkey-sized herbivorous dinosaur has been discovered in 113 million year old rocks in southeastern Australia. The fossilized tail and foot bones give new insight into the diversity of the small, bipedal herbivorous dinosaurs called ornithopods.

Released:
10-Jan-2018 7:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    4-Jan-2018 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 687275

The Secret World of Dinosaur Tracks

Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB)

Scans of fossilized dinosaur prints show how some dinosaur feet moved not just on top of but through the earth. The results of this study will be presented at the annual conference of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology in San Francisco, CA on January 4, 2018

Released:
27-Dec-2017 4:40 PM EST
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Article ID: 686238

Evolutionary Biologists Say Recently Discovered Fossil Shows Transition of a Reptile From Life on Land to Life in the Sea

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Using modern research tools on a 155-million-year-old reptile fossil, scientists at Johns Hopkins and the American Museum of Natural History report they have filled in some important clues to the evolution of animals that once roamed land and transitioned to life in the water.

Released:
6-Dec-2017 9:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Nov-2017 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 685141

Plesiosaur Flippers Inspire a Steering Mechanism for Swimming Robotic Vehicle

American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Plesiosaurs, who thrived during the early to middle Jurassic Period, used four paddlelike flippers of nearly equal size and musculature to swim. Despite the seemingly subpar engineering, the fossil record reveals that plesiosaurs were widespread and prolific. This inspired a team in the U.K. to explore how swimming with four flippers might be advantageous compared to two. They’ll present their work during the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, 2017.

Released:
14-Nov-2017 8:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Nov-2017 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 685181

Stinging Cells Pack a Powerful Pressure

American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

The stinging cells of jellyfish, called nematocytes, have evolved to be one of the world’s most efficient predation tools. The nematocysts consist of a capsule and folded tubule, and use high pressure and acceleration for defense and locomotion and, more importantly, to capture prey. Inconsistencies in a previous conceptual explanation of the stinging cell mechanism were identified using a microfluidic system and mathematical models. Researchers will share their mathematical model of nemotocytes at the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, 2017. The model demonstrates how environmental modifications can reduce the impact of jellyfish stinging capacity.

Released:
14-Nov-2017 1:05 PM EST
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