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Medicine

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Systolic Blood Pressure, Hypertension, High Blood Pressure, Sprint, Intensive blood pressure control

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 23-Aug-2017 5:00 PM EDT

Medicine

Science

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National Institute Of Environmental Health Sciences, Niehs, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, mouse embryo, Male Reproductive Tract, Sex-Specific Reproductive System, COUP-TF11 Protein

Female Mouse Embryos Actively Remove Male Reproductive Systems

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A protein called COUP-TFII determines whether a mouse embryo develops a male reproductive tract, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health and their colleagues at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston. The discovery, which appeared online August 17 in the journal Science, changes the long-standing belief that an embryo will automatically become female unless androgens, or male hormones, in the embryo make it male.

Science

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Biochemistry, Neurochemistry, Neurobiolgy, Parkinson's Disease

Researchers Make Surprising Discovery About How Neurons Talk to Each Other

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New findings challenge existing dogma that neurons release fixed amounts of chemical signal at any one time and could have implications for brain disorders including Parkinson's and schizhophrenia.

Medicine

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Victor Velculescu, Cancer, Blood Test

Scientists Develop Blood Test That Spots Tumor-Derived DNA in People with Early-Stage Cancers

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In a bid to detect cancers early and in a noninvasive way, scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report they have developed a test that spots tiny amounts of cancer-specific DNA in blood and have used it to accurately identify more than half of 138 people with relatively early-stage colorectal, breast, lung and ovarian cancers.

Science

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electrochromic polymer, Aqueous Chemistry, aqueous dispersions, electrochromic film, Conjugated Polymers, printable electronics, spray coatings

Spray-on Electric Rainbows: Making Safer Electrochromic Inks

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A flick of a switch, and electrochromic films change their colors, making sunglasses, windows, and mirrors tint, or textiles flip their shades. Now they can be applied more safely and more commonly thanks to an innovative chemical process that makes them water soluble.

Medicine

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MRI, MRI contrast agents, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents , Veins, internal organs, Disease Diagnosis, nature scientific reports, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cancer, Genetic Diseases, Cystic Fibrosis, Metabolic Diseases, Diabetes, imaging applications, biomarkers, molecular therapies

Multicolor MRIs Could Aid Disease Detection

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have developed a method that could make magnetic resonance imaging—MRI—multicolor. Current MRI techniques rely on a single contrast agent injected into a patient’s veins to vivify images. The new method uses two at once, which could allow doctors to map multiple characteristics of a patient’s internal organs in a single MRI. The strategy could serve as a research tool and even aid disease diagnosis.

Medicine

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Nanoengineering, nanotechnnology, micromotors, Micromachines, Drug Delivery, UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, Stomach Infection, Helicobacter Pylori, In Vivo

Drug-Delivering Micromotors Treat Their First Bacterial Infection in the Stomach

Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have demonstrated for the first time using micromotors to treat a bacterial infection in the stomach. These tiny vehicles, each about half the width of a human hair, swim rapidly throughout the stomach while neutralizing gastric acid and then release their cargo of antibiotics at the desired pH.

Science

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Additive, additive manufacturing, 3-D printing, Security, Quality Assurance

Print No Evil – Three-Layer Technique Helps Secure Additive Manufacturing

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Researchers have developed a three-layer system to verify that components produced using additive manufacturing have not been compromised.

Medicine

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Weight, Appetite Control, Diabetes, Endocrinology, Brain, Insula, Walnuts, Satiety, fMRI

In a Nutshell: Walnuts Activate Brain Region Involved in Appetite Control

Packed with nutrients linked to better health, walnuts are also thought to discourage overeating by promoting feelings of fullness. Now, in a new brain imaging study, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have demonstrated that consuming walnuts activates an area in the brain associated with regulating hunger and cravings. The findings, published online in the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, reveal for the first time the neurocognitive impact these nuts have on the brain.

Medicine

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zika, West Nile, Zika disease severity, Zika infection, West Nile Vaccine, Vaccine Development, TTUHSC El Paso, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El, Anjali Joshi, Himanshu Garg, Dengue, antibody-dependent enhancement

Can Previous Exposure to West Nile Alter the Course of Zika?

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EL PASO, Texas - West Nile virus is no stranger to the U.S.-Mexico border; thousands of people in the region have contracted the mosquito-borne virus in the past. But could this previous exposure affect how intensely Zika sickens someone now?







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