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Medicine

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Brain, Neuron, Neuroscience, Alzheimer's

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 18-Dec-2017 7:00 AM EST

Medicine

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James Kirby, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

BIDMC Researchers Use Artificial Intelligence to Identify Bacteria Quickly and Accurately

Microscopes enhanced with artificial intelligence (AI) could help clinical microbiologists diagnose potentially deadly blood infections and improve patients’ odds of survival, according to microbiologists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC).

Medicine

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Race, age, End Of Life, End Of Life Care, Hospital Admission, Emergency Medicine, Emergency Admissions, hospice and palliative care, Hospice, palliative and end-of-life care, Palliative Care, African American, Medicare Beneficiaries, Demograhics, Elderly Care, Elderly, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai Health System

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 18-Dec-2017 12:00 AM EST

Medicine

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Pollution, Asthma, Children, Corinne Keet

Exposure to Larger Air Particles Linked to Increased Risk of Asthma in Children

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Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University report statistical evidence that children exposed to airborne coarse particulate matter — a mix of dust, sand and non-exhaust tailpipe emissions, such as tire rubber — are more likely to develop asthma and need emergency room or hospital treatment for it than unexposed children.

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Cancer, lncRNA, Thor

How Defeating THOR Could Bring a Hammer Down on Cancer

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Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center uncovered a novel gene they named THOR. It's a long non-coding RNA that plays a role in cancer development. Knocking it out can halt the growth of tumors.

Medicine

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Brain, Glutamate, Receptor, Albert Lau, Neurotransmitter

Johns Hopkins Scientists Chart How Brain Signals Connect to Neurons

Scientists at Johns Hopkins have used supercomputers to create an atomic scale map that tracks how the signaling chemical glutamate binds to a neuron in the brain. The findings, say the scientists, shed light on the dynamic physics of the chemical’s pathway, as well as the speed of nerve cell communications.

Medicine

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muscle stem cells, skeletal muscle, Muscular Diseases, Muscular dystrophies, Aging, tissue damage, MUSCLE ATROPHY

Researchers Track Muscle Stem Cell Dynamics in Response to Injury and Aging

A new study led by SBP describes the biology behind why muscle stem cells respond differently to aging or injury. The findings, published in Cell Stem Cell, have important implications for the normal wear and tear of aging.

Medicine

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Fertility, Miscarriage, Cells, Natural Killer Cells

Womb Natural Killer Cell Discovery Could Lead to Screening for Miscarriage Risk

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For the first time the functions of natural killer cells in the womb have been identified.

Medicine

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Case Western Reserve University School Of Medicine, NIH, Grants, Jonathan Haines, population and quantitative health sciences, Gene Sequencing, Amish, Seniors, Geriatric Medicine, Mental Health, Clinical Trials

Probing Alzheimer’s at Both Ends of the Spectrum

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have received two grant awards, in partnership with investigators from other institutions, from the National Institutes of Health to conduct major studies on Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of memory loss and other forms of dementia in older persons.

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National Institute Of Environmental Health Sciences, Niehs, Allergens, pets, Pests, Nhanes

Allergens Widespread in Largest Study of U.S. Homes

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Allergens are widespread, but highly variable in U.S. homes, according to the nation’s largest indoor allergen study to date. Researchers from the National Institutes of Health report that over 90 percent of homes had three or more detectable allergens, and 73 percent of homes had at least one allergen at elevated levels. The findings were published November 30 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.







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