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Article ID: 708550

Medicaid expansion in Kentucky led to an increase in screening and improved survival for colorectal cancer patients

American College of Surgeons (ACS)

The number of low-income patients screened for colorectal cancer more than tripled after Medicaid expansion in 2014, according to study findings in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

Released:
22-Feb-2019 12:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 708534

Older Biologic Age Linked to Elevated Breast Cancer Risk

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

Biologic age, a DNA-based estimate of a person’s age, is associated with future development of breast cancer, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health. If a woman’s biologic age was older than her chronologic age, she had a 15 percent increased risk of developing breast cancer.

Released:
22-Feb-2019 10:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 708514

Study: CommunityRx helps patients gain confidence to find, navigate nearby health resources

University of Chicago Medical Center

Research published in the American Journal of Public Health shows CommunityRx helps patients gain confidence finding health resources in their own neighborhoods.

Released:
21-Feb-2019 4:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Feb-2019 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 708273

ACA’s Pre-Existing Condition & Age Clauses Had Immediate Impact on People with Diabetes

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A pair of Affordable Care Act clauses had a sizable effect on the ability of people with diabetes to get health insurance, a new study suggests. Before the requirements took effect, the percentage of people with private health insurance who had diabetes had declined, but it began to increase again after the ACA required insurers to accept people with pre-existing conditions, and limited their ability to charge higher rates to older people.

Released:
19-Feb-2019 8:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 708496

Building a better part for your heart

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Bioengineers are designing aortic heart valve replacements made of polymers rather than animal tissues. The goal is to optimize valve performance and enable increased use of a minimally-invasive method for valve replacement over the current practice of open heart surgery.

Released:
21-Feb-2019 2:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Feb-2019 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 708364

More Flexible Nanomaterials Can Make Fuel Cell Cars Cheaper

Johns Hopkins University

A new method of increasing the reactivity of ultrathin nanosheets, just a few atoms thick, can someday make fuel cells for hydrogen cars cheaper, finds a new Johns Hopkins study.

Released:
20-Feb-2019 11:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Feb-2019 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 708466

Electric car batteries inspire safer, cheaper way to manufacture compounds used in medicines

Scripps Research Institute

Scientists at Scripps Research, inspired by electric car batteries, have developed a battery-like system that allows them to make potential advancements for the manufacturing of medicines.

Released:
21-Feb-2019 2:00 PM EST
Embargo will expire:
25-Feb-2019 11:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
21-Feb-2019 10:30 AM EST

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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Feb-2019 10:00 AM EST

Article ID: 708338

Unnecessary testing for UTIs cut by nearly half

Washington University in St. Louis

Over-testing for urinary tract infections (UTIs) leads to unnecessary antibiotic use, which spreads antibiotic resistance. Infectious disease specialists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis made changes to hospital procedures that cut urine tests by nearly half without compromising doctors’ abilities to detect UTIs.

Released:
19-Feb-2019 4:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 708435

Earning a bee’s wings

Washington University in St. Louis

When a honey bee turns 21 days old, she leaves the nest to look for pollen and nectar. For her, this is a moment of great risk, and great reward. It’s also the moment at which she becomes recognizable to other bees.

Released:
21-Feb-2019 7:05 AM EST

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