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Embargo will expire:
25-Jul-2019 11:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
23-Jul-2019 1:05 PM EDT

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Newswise: Study In Mice Advances Understanding of How Brains Remember Decisions — For Better or Worse

Article ID: 716179

Study In Mice Advances Understanding of How Brains Remember Decisions — For Better or Worse

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Mammal brains — including those of humans — store and recall impressive amounts of information based on our good and bad decisions and interactions in an ever-changing world. Now, in a series of new experiments with mice, scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine report they have added to evidence that such “decision-based” memories are stored in very particular parts of the brain.

Released:
23-Jul-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Newswise: To Assess a Cell’s Health, Follow the Glucose

Article ID: 716209

To Assess a Cell’s Health, Follow the Glucose

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

A new spectroscopic technique reveals that glucose use in live cells provides valuable information about the functional status of cells, tissues, and organs. Shifts in a cell’s use of glucose can signal changes in health and progress of disease.

Released:
23-Jul-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Newswise: Garlic on Broccoli: A Smelly Approach to Repel a Major Pest
  • Embargo expired:
    23-Jul-2019 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 716116

Garlic on Broccoli: A Smelly Approach to Repel a Major Pest

University of Vermont

A University of Vermont study offers a novel framework to test strategies for managing invasive pests. Applying the framework to swede midge, a new invasive fly causing 100% crop losses for organic broccoli growers, the researchers have uncovered which odors are most effective at repelling the pest.

Released:
21-Jul-2019 3:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    23-Jul-2019 12:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 716083

People Are More Likely to Try Drugs for the First Time During the Summer

NYU Langone Health

American teenagers and adults are more likely to try illegal or recreational drugs for the first time in the summer, a new study shows.

Released:
19-Jul-2019 12:30 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Jul-2019 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 716107

Genes linked to death from sepsis ID’d in mice

Washington University in St. Louis

Bacteria in the bloodstream can trigger an overwhelming immune response that causes sepsis. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found genes that help protect the body's cells from dying during sepsis, which could lead to new treatments for the life-threatening condition.

Released:
19-Jul-2019 3:05 PM EDT
Newswise: New study explains the molecular mechanism for the therapeutic effects of cilantro

Article ID: 716153

New study explains the molecular mechanism for the therapeutic effects of cilantro

University of California, Irvine

Herbs, including cilantro, have a long history of use as folk medicine anticonvulsants. Until now, many of the underlying mechanisms of how the herbs worked remained unknown. In a new study, researchers uncovered the molecular action that enables cilantro to effectively delay certain seizures common in epilepsy and other diseases.

Released:
22-Jul-2019 12:05 PM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    22-Jul-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 715932

Molecular Sensor Scouts DNA Damage and Supervises Repair

Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Using single-molecule imaging, researchers witness how molecules find and fix damaged DNA

Released:
17-Jul-2019 11:00 AM EDT
Newswise: Common Feature of Cancer Cells That Makes Them Appear Overstuffed May Also Be Their Achilles’ Heel

Article ID: 716097

Common Feature of Cancer Cells That Makes Them Appear Overstuffed May Also Be Their Achilles’ Heel

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a study using yeast cells and data from cancer cell lines, Johns Hopkins University scientists report they have found a potential weak spot among cancer cells that have extra sets of chromosomes, the structures that carry genetic material. The vulnerability, they say, is rooted in a common feature among cancer cells — their high intracellular protein concentrations — that make them appear bloated and overstuffed, and which could be used as possible new targets for cancer treatments.

Released:
22-Jul-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Embargo will expire:
25-Jul-2019 2:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
21-Jul-2019 8:00 PM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 25-Jul-2019 2:00 PM EDT

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