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Science

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Blindness, Myocilin, Glaucoma, glaucoma research, hereditary glaucoma, olfactomedin, Propeller, Protein Misfolding, Protein Misfolding Disease, Trabecular Meshwork, Trabecular, Prion, Amyloid Fibrils, Amyloid, Clogging, y-shape, tripartite, Coiled Coil, dimer, tetramer

‘Y’ a Protein Unicorn Might Matter in Blindness

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A protein shaped like a "Y" makes scientists do a double-take and may change the way they think about a protein sometimes implicated in glaucoma. The Y is a centerpiece in myocilin, binding four other components nicknamed propellers together like balloons on strings.

Medicine

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Prostate Cancer, Beta Blockers, Nervous System

Study Shows How Nerves Drive Prostate Cancer

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In a study in today’s issue of Science, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore Medicine, report that certain nerves sustain prostate cancer growth by triggering a switch that causes tumor vessels to proliferate. Their earlier research—which first implicated nerves in fueling prostate cancer—has prompted Montefiore-Einstein to conduct a pilot study testing whether beta blockers (commonly used for treating hypertension) can kill cancer cells in tumors of men diagnosed with prostate cancer.

Medicine

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Genetics, genes, TMEM106B, Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration, Ftld, ALS, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, Neurology, Neurons, Neurodegeneration

Penn Researchers Drill Down into Gene Behind Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

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A new study published online this week in the American Journal of Human Genetics from Penn researchers uncovers the mechanisms of the genetic mutations, or variants, associated with the TMEM106B gene.

Medicine

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brain training, Brain Tasks, Hearing, Hearing Aid

Brain Training Can Improve Our Understanding of Speech in Noisy Places

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For many people with hearing challenges, trying to follow a conversation in a crowded restaurant or other noisy venue is a major struggle, even with hearing aids. Now, Mass. Eye and Ear researchers reporting in Current Biology on October 19th have some good news: time spent playing a specially designed, brain-training audiogame could help.

Medicine

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HIV-1, GP41, AIDS, Envelope Protein, Structural Biology, NMR, Retrovirus

Last unknown structure of HIV-1 solved, another step in efforts to disarm the AIDS virus

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Researchers have solved the last unknown protein structure of HIV-1, the retrovirus that can cause AIDS. This will further explain how the virus infects human cells and how progeny viruses are assembled and released from infected cells.

Medicine

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ferroptosis, Hülya Bayɪr, Valerian Kagan, Sally Wenzel, Cell Death, PEBP1, Asthma, Kidney Injury, Brain Trauma, 15LO

Tracing Cell Death Pathway Points to Drug Targets for Brain Damage, Kidney Injury, Asthma

University of Pittsburgh scientists are unlocking the complexities of a recently discovered cell death process that plays a key role in health and disease, and new findings link their discovery to asthma, kidney injury and brain trauma. The results, reported today in the journal Cell, are the early steps toward drug development that could transform emergency and critical care treatment.

Medicine

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Cancer, job lock, Health Insurance

New Study Finds Childhood Cancer Survivors Commonly Stay at Jobs to Keep Health Insurance

The results of a national cancer survey find a significant number of childhood cancer survivors are worried about keeping their health insurance, to the point of letting it affect their career decisions. The findings were published today in JAMA Oncology.

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Insulin Signaling Molecule in Liver Controls Levels of Triglyceride in Blood

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A new animal study shows how insulin controls the movement and storage of fat molecules in the liver and how a breakdown in this system could lead to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and changes in circulating lipid levels associated with cardiovascular disease.

Medicine

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Cataract Surgery, Wayne State University, National Eye Institute, endophthalmitis

Wayne State Receives $1.9 Million NIH Grant to Develop Novel Approach to Treat Bacterial Endophthalmitis

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A Wayne State University research team recently received a $1.9 million grant from the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health to develop new treatment approaches for Endophthalmitis, a severe inflammation of the interior of the eye caused by contaminating microorganisms that enter the eye following trauma or surgery.

Science

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Ammonia, Harvard Medical School, Marcia Haigis, Breast Cancer, Recycling

New Study Reveals Breast Cancer Cells Recycle Their Own Ammonia Waste as Fuel

Breast cancer cells recycle ammonia, a waste byproduct of cell metabolism, and use it as a source of nitrogen to fuel tumor growth. The insights shed light on the biological role of ammonia in cancer and may inform the design of new therapeutic strategies to slow tumor growth.







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