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  • Embargo expired:
    15-Nov-2018 5:00 AM EST

Article ID: 703568

Studies Examine Sexual and Reproductive Empowerment in Sub-Saharan Africa

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Women in Ethiopia, Nigeria and Uganda are often pressured by family and through societal expectations to have more children, but commonly resort to covert or indirect means of contraception to maintain some reproductive autonomy. This is a central finding from a cross-country study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Released:
7-Nov-2018 3:05 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    15-Nov-2018 1:00 AM EST

Article ID: 703569

News Brief: 2018 International Conference on Family Planning in Kigali, Rwanda

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

At the fifth International Conference on Family Planning (ICFP) in Kigali, Rwanda, taking place Nov. 12 to 15, 2018, there will be four new research findings presented. The 2018 ICFP is co-hosted by the Bill & Melinda Gates Institute for Population and Reproductive Health, which is based at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Rwanda.

Released:
7-Nov-2018 3:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 703542

UIC to host event exploring Chicago's native communities

University of Illinois at Chicago

The University of Illinois at Chicago's Great Cities Institute and Native American Support Program will present Natives in Chicago, a discussion on the impact of policies and the work of community organizations to provide services and programs that contribute to the city's thriving native communities.

Released:
7-Nov-2018 12:05 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 703540

UIC scholar honored for work serving the 'public good'

University of Illinois at Chicago

Barbara Ransby, a University of Illinois at Chicago historian, writer and activist, is the recipient of the American Studies Association's 2018 Angela Y. Davis Prize for Public Scholarship, which recognizes scholars who have applied or used their scholarship for the betterment of society.

Released:
7-Nov-2018 11:05 AM EST

Arts and Humanities

Article ID: 702274

Religious Leaders’ Support May Be Key to Modern Contraception Use

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Women in Nigeria whose clerics extol the benefits of family planning were significantly more likely to adopt modern contraceptive methods, new research suggests, highlighting the importance of engaging religious leaders to help increase the country’s stubbornly low uptake of family planning services.

Released:
16-Oct-2018 10:20 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 701658

Reducing HIV, other STIs among young black women in South Africa

University of Illinois at Chicago

The University of Illinois at Chicago is one of eight universities awarded funding by the National Institutes of Health to prevent and treat sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, among adolescents and young adults in Africa and Brazil. Collectively, the international projects are known as Prevention and Treatment through a Comprehensive Care Continuum for HIV-affected Adolescents in Resource Constrained Settings (PATC3H).

Released:
4-Oct-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 701512

Prince William Visits United for Wildlife Project At the College of African Wildlife Management, Mweka in Tanzania

Wildlife Conservation Society

The Duke of Cambridge, Prince William visited Tanzania’s College of African Wildlife Management (CAWM), Mweka, as part of his current visit to Africa as President of United for Wildlife. While there, the Duke took part in an exercise as part of SMART training at the college being supported by United for Wildlife and implemented by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).

Released:
2-Oct-2018 4:40 PM EDT
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Article ID: 700262

Drought, Conflict and Migration in Kenya

University of Utah

The study is the first to use a nationwide survey representing an entire country in sub-Saharan Africa to find connections between droughts, migration and violence. The survey asked if respondents had to move because of drought, were victims of violence, and, using an indirect questioning method, whether they have latent support violence.

Released:
10-Sep-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Aug-2018 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 699219

Sequencing Genomes of Nigerian Women Could Help Prevent Many Lethal Breast Cancers

University of Chicago Medical Center

A study that enrolled more than 2,000 Nigerian women found that disparities in breast cancer mortality disproportionately impact women of African ancestry. Nigerian women with mutations in breast cancer genes have higher risks than women in the U.S. with mutations in the same genes. Inherited breast cancer plays a bigger role in Nigeria.

Released:
20-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Aug-2018 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 699030

Archaeologists Reveal Massive Monumental Cemetery Built by Eastern Africa’s Earliest Herders Near Lake Turkana, Kenya

Stony Brook University

A groundbreaking study has found the earliest and largest monumental cemetery in eastern Africa built 5,000 years ago by early pastoralists living around Lake Turkana, Kenya. This group is believed to have lived without major inequalities and hierarchies, contradicting long-standing narratives about the origins of early civilizations. The study, led by Elisabeth Hildebrand, PhD, Department of Anthropology at Stony Brook University, will be published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Released:
15-Aug-2018 12:15 PM EDT

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