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Acid reflux drugs may have negative side effects for breast cancer survivors

Ohio State University

Acid reflux drugs that are sometimes recommended to ease stomach problems during cancer treatment may have an unintended side effect: impairment of breast cancer survivors’ memory and concentration.

Channels: Cancer, Clinical Trials, Cognition and Learning, Digestive Disorders, Neuro, Pharmaceuticals, Women's Health, All Journal News, Staff Picks,

Released:
17-Jan-2020 10:25 AM EST
Embargo will expire:
22-Jan-2020 9:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
17-Jan-2020 9:00 AM EST

EMBARGOED

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Research Results
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Released:
17-Jan-2020 1:40 AM EST
Research Results
Embargo will expire:
20-Jan-2020 8:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
16-Jan-2020 3:05 PM EST

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 20-Jan-2020 8:00 AM EST

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Research Results
Newswise: FSU Research: Male and female firefighters have different problems with protective suits

FSU Research: Male and female firefighters have different problems with protective suits

Florida State University

When female firefighters put on the protective suits they need for their work, they’re often using gear that has been designed for a male body.Because of that mismatch, the suits don’t fit as well as they should, and their mobility is impaired. Firefighters working in gear that restricts their movement must work harder to move around in a stressful and physically demanding environment, which puts them at greater risk of overexertion and heart attacks, the leading cause of on-duty deaths.

Channels: Cardiovascular Health, Gender Issues, In the Workplace, Men's Health, Patient Safety, Women's Health, All Journal News,

Released:
16-Jan-2020 10:40 AM EST
Research Results
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Texas Abortion Patients’ Attempts to End Their Pregnancy on Their Own is Higher than the National Rate, New Study Finds

University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

Seven percent of Texas abortion patients in the study reported trying to self-manage abortion before coming to a clinic for services. Women cited cost and long distance to clinics as reasons for choosing to self-manage abortion.

Channels: Government/Law, Healthcare, OBGYN, Women's Health, Local - Texas, All Journal News,

Released:
15-Jan-2020 2:20 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Study: Women’s Blood Vessels Age Faster Than Men's
  • Embargo expired:
    15-Jan-2020 11:05 AM EST

Study: Women’s Blood Vessels Age Faster Than Men's

Cedars-Sinai

Many medical experts have long believed that women simply 'catch up' to men in terms of their cardiovascular risk, but new research shows for the first time that women's blood vessels age at a faster rate than men's. The findings could help to explain why women tend to develop different types of cardiovascular disease and with different timing than men.

Channels: Cardiovascular Health, Healthcare, Heart Disease, Women's Health, JAMA, All Journal News,

Released:
13-Jan-2020 4:05 PM EST
Research Results
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Certified nurse-midwives lead collaborative care model as solution to obstetrician shortage

Mayo Clinic

Fewer physicians are pursuing careers in obstetrics, in part because of the intense, round-the-clock demands of the job and a high burnout rate. An unusually large number of practicing obstetricians are expected to retire within the next decade, which will add to an already acute physician shortage.

Channels: All Journal News, Nursing, Obesity, Women's Health,

Released:
15-Jan-2020 11:00 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: The Truth About the HPV Vaccine: 7 Myths and Facts You Need to Know

The Truth About the HPV Vaccine: 7 Myths and Facts You Need to Know

Nuvance Health

A vaccine is available to protect against human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection and can cause diseases such as genital warts and cancer. The HPV vaccine now protects against nine strains of HPV. Research shows that the HPV vaccine is safe and effective. The HPV vaccine is approved for men and women between the ages of 9 to 45. The HPV vaccine can protect adults from HPV-related diseases, however it provides the most protection when it is given in childhood before someone becomes sexually active. Parents should talk with their child’s pediatrician about the HPV vaccine. Adult men should ask their primary care provider about the HPV vaccine, and adult women should speak with their gynecologist.

Channels: Infectious Diseases, Men's Health, Sex and Relationships, Vaccines, Women's Health,

Released:
15-Jan-2020 8:05 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Racial disparities in heart failure explained

Racial disparities in heart failure explained

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Researchers at UT Southwestern have uncovered evidence that the higher prevalence of “malignant” enlargement of the heart among blacks contributes to the higher incidence of heart failure in this population.

Channels: Cardiovascular Health, Healthcare, Heart Disease, Men's Health, Race and Ethnicity, Women's Health, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), All Journal News,

Released:
14-Jan-2020 3:00 PM EST
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