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Article ID: 711947

Maternal-fetal medicine specialist first in US to lead clinical trial on life-threatening fetal blood disorder

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

An investigational drug that may block harmful antibodies from passing through the placenta of an expectant mother to the fetus is the focus of a new clinical trial led by Kenneth Moise, MD, a maternal-fetal medicine specialist at UTHealth.

Released:
25-Apr-2019 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 711950

Impeding White Blood Cells in Antiphospholipid Syndrome Reduced Blood Clots

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study examined APS at the cellular level and found that two drugs reduced development of blood clots in mice affected with the condition.

Released:
25-Apr-2019 3:00 PM EDT
Embargo will expire:
30-Apr-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
25-Apr-2019 12:05 PM EDT

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Article ID: 711866

Chemotherapy or not?

Case Western Reserve University

Case Western Reserve University researchers and partners, including a collaborator at Cleveland Clinic, are pushing the boundaries of how “smart” diagnostic-imaging machines identify cancers—and uncovering clues outside the tumor to tell whether a patient will respond well to chemotherapy.

Released:
24-Apr-2019 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 711848

The Medical Minute: When PMS becomes debilitating

Penn State Health

Many women suffer from premenstrual syndrome, or PMS. But some experience a severe and possibly disabling subset of PMS known as premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

Released:
24-Apr-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 711681

National Comprehensive Cancer Network Working with Health Officials in Bolivia to Improve Cancer Care

National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

National Comprehensive Cancer Network to adapt NCCN Guidelines® for Breast, Cervical, and Rectal Cancer to better meet cancer burden and resource levels in Bolivia.

Released:
24-Apr-2019 8:30 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Apr-2019 12:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 711607

Use of Genetic Testing in Women Diagnosed with Breast Cancer Decreases Cost of Care Nationwide

Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center

A new study suggests that Oncotype DX-guided treatment could reduce the cost for the first year of breast cancer care in the U.S. by about $50 million (about 2 percent of the overall costs in the first year). The study by Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center and National Cancer Institute researchers was published April 24, in JNCI.

Released:
19-Apr-2019 10:30 AM EDT
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Article ID: 711792

Women underreport prevalence and intensity of their own snoring

American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM)

A new study of adults who were referred for evaluation of a suspected sleep disorder suggests that women tend to underreport snoring and underestimate its loudness.

Released:
23-Apr-2019 1:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    23-Apr-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 711690

Majority of U.S. states restrict decision making for incapacitated pregnant women, report shows

Mayo Clinic

Half of all U.S. states have laws on the books that invalidate a pregnant woman's advance directive if she becomes incapacitated, and a majority of states don't disclose these restrictions in advance directive forms, according to a study by physicians and bioethicists at Mayo Clinic and other institutions.

Released:
22-Apr-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 711645

Number of Women Who Aren't Physically Active Enough is High And Growing

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Using data from a national survey representing more than 19 million U.S. women with established cardiovascular disease, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say that more than half of women with the condition do not do enough physical activity and those numbers have grown over the last decade. These results imply that targeted counseling to exercise more could reduce risk of cardiovascular disease as well as associated health care costs over their lifetimes.

Released:
23-Apr-2019 9:00 AM EDT

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