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  • Embargo expired:
    16-Aug-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 699081

When Sulfur Disappears Without Trace

University of Vienna

Many natural products and drugs feature a so-called dicarbonyl motif – in certain cases however their preparation poses a challenge to organic chemists. In their most recent work, Nuno Maulide and his coworkers from the University of Vienna present a new route for these molecules. They use oxidized sulfur compounds even though sulfur is not included in the final product. The results are now published in the prestigious journal "Science".

Released:
16-Aug-2018 4:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 699107

Missouri S&T Chemist Rolls the Dice to Better Identify Chiral Molecules in Drugs

Missouri University of Science and Technology

“High risk, high reward” is the kind of discovery Dr. Garry Grubbs seeks with a new experiment designed to rapidly identify the atomic structure of chiral molecules widely used in pharmaceutical drugs. The finding could significantly reduce the time and costs involved in pharmaceutical development and manufacturing.

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16-Aug-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 699099

Taking a Closer Look at Unevenly Charged Biomolecules

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Clinicians most often monitor antibodies because these small proteins attach to antigens, or foreign substances, we face every day. Most biomolecules, however, have complicated charge characteristics, and the sensor response from conventional carbon nanotube systems can be erratic. A team in Japan recently revealed how these systems work and proposed changes to dramatically improve biomolecule detection. They report their findings in the Journal of Applied Physics.

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16-Aug-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 699032

Increasing Influence of ECS Journals

The Electrochemical Society

The journal impact factors (JIFs) for the ECS journals continue to grow. Increase in citations and downloads are just some of the factors that are placing ECS journals among the top ranked.

Released:
15-Aug-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698920

Common WiFi Can Detect Weapons, Bombs and Chemicals in Bags

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Ordinary WiFi can easily detect weapons, bombs and explosive chemicals in bags at museums, stadiums, theme parks, schools and other public venues, according to a Rutgers University–New Brunswick-led study. The researchers’ suspicious object detection system is easy to set up, reduces security screening costs and avoids invading privacy such as when screeners open and inspect bags, backpacks and luggage. Traditional screening typically requires high staffing levels and costly specialized equipment.

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15-Aug-2018 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698979

Tulane researcher awarded $1.65M to study fundamentals behind protein build-up linked to Alzheimer’s

Tulane University

Tulane University research could shed light on the molecular details of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

Released:
14-Aug-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    14-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698903

Simulating Biomolecules Just Got Faster and More Accurate

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Researchers from the University of Florida and the Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul in Brazil have used state of the art simulations to assess the effect of both pH and redox potential, or rate of electron transfer, on a biomolecule.

Released:
13-Aug-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698904

Argonne chemist receives gold medal from The Combustion Institute

Argonne National Laboratory

Argonne chemist Stephen Klippenstein has received a gold medal from The Combustion Institute, one of the highest honors given in the field of combustion chemistry.

Released:
13-Aug-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698778

Experts available to talk about the rollback of asbestos regulations

West Virginia University

Released:
9-Aug-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Law and Public Policy

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Article ID: 698730

Milsmann earns prestigious NSF CAREER Award

West Virginia University

Carsten Milsmann, assistant professor in the C. Eugene Bennett Department of Chemistry at West Virginia University, has earned the National Science Foundation’s prestigious CAREER Award for research that could help develop solar energy applications that are more efficient and cheaper to produce.

Released:
8-Aug-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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