Press "esc" to clear
Go to Advanced Search

Showing results

110 of 4010
Worklifebalance.jpg

Article ID: 702612

Leave the Job at Work to Ensure Better Health and Sleep

University of South Australia

Feeling tired, sluggish and sleep-deprived? The culprit could be work-creep, according to new research from the University of South Australia released today.

Released:
23-Oct-2018 3:30 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

bernard-fraga.jpg

Article ID: 702646

Election 'turnout gap' between white and nonwhite voters is large and decisive, book shows

Indiana University

The gap in voter turnout between white and nonwhite citizens is large and growing, resulting in profound challenges for American democracy, according to a new research-based book by an Indiana University political scientist.

Released:
23-Oct-2018 12:05 PM EDT

Law and Public Policy

Article ID: 702635

NYC-based mobile lab brings studies to under-represented groups

Cornell University

A New York City-based mobile communication lab is enabling researchers to diversify their pool of study participants to include those rarely surveyed and hardest hit by society’s problems.

Released:
23-Oct-2018 11:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 702558

Motion Sickness vs. Cybersickness: Two Different Problems or Variations on the Same Condition?

American Physiological Society (APS)

Contrary to previous research, severe motion sickness and cybersickness—a type of motion sickness that stems from exposure to virtual reality—may be considered the same clinical condition, according to researchers. The findings, the first to study both conditions in the same group of people, are published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.

Released:
23-Oct-2018 7:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 702606

Inside Fear and its Disorders

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Why are some people’s nightmares other people’s joyrides?

Released:
22-Oct-2018 4:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 702589

Knowledge is power: Knowing the potential risks of hormonal birth control can help college women make more informed choices for their health and well-being

Northern Arizona University

Northern Arizona University professor Sean Gregory's research found hormonal contraception use among young women is correlated with an increased risk of depression, which is correlated with adverse results in academic performance.

Released:
22-Oct-2018 2:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Embargo will expire:
25-Oct-2018 4:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
22-Oct-2018 12:05 PM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 25-Oct-2018 4:00 PM EDT

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Article ID: 702565

Antipsychotics Ineffective For Treating ICU Delirium

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Critically ill patients are not benefitting from antipsychotic medications that have been used to treat delirium in intensive care units (ICUs) for more than four decades, according to a study released today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Released:
22-Oct-2018 11:05 AM EDT
SajatovicSept2018.jpg

Article ID: 702556

Database Funded to Help Researchers Understand the Effect of Bipolar Disorder throughout Adult Lifespan

Case Western Reserve University

Not much is known about how bipolar disorder (BD) affects people throughout their lives. Do women and men differ in the severity of their symptoms? Does a person’s age when a bipolar diagnosis is made have any bearing on how severe the symptoms are? How do other medical conditions affect symptoms of BD across the life-span? These questions and others like them are the focus of an international team of researchers, joined by Martha Sajatovic, MD, professor of psychiatry and of neurology at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, who has received a three-year, $600,000 grant from the International Society for Bipolar Disorders. She and her colleagues will develop the first-of-its-kind multi-national database that can be used to help researchers address questions about BD throughout the adult lifespan.

Released:
22-Oct-2018 10:05 AM EDT

Showing results

110 of 4010

Chat now!