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Article ID: 690038

Exercising with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: I Want to Be Fit and Strong

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Signing up for 5Ks and even a 10K is a feat many people with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may not have dared to attempt a decade or two ago. Fear of tragedy leads many HCM patients to a sedentary lifestyle.

Released:
22-Feb-2018 6:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 690033

Less Expensive, Post-Acute Care Options for Seniors Underutilized

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Long-term acute care (LTAC) facilities are designed to meet the needs of older adults with severe, complex illnesses who are recovering from hospitalization, but less expensive options sometimes overlooked may also be available, population health researchers at UT Southwestern found.

Released:
22-Feb-2018 5:05 PM EST
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All Journal News, Healthcare, Public Health, JAMA, Local - Texas, Local - Dallas Metro

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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Feb-2018 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689955

Study Shows Need for Early Support Among People with Uveal Melanoma

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA researchers found that nearly all people diagnosed with uveal melanoma had a number of unmet psychological and health information needs, particularly during the first three months after their diagnoses. The study is the first prospective, longitudinal approach to examine supportive care needs among patients with this disease, and suggested more acute needs among people with uveal melanoma than people with other cancers.

Released:
22-Feb-2018 11:00 AM EST
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All Journal News, Cancer, Vision, JAMA, Local - California, Local - LA Metro

Article ID: 689599

University of Pennsylvania Researchers Conduct Comprehensive Evaluation of Patients with Concussion-Like Symptoms Following Reports of Audible Phenomena in Cuba

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A comprehensive evaluation by clinical researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania identified a neurological syndrome that left U.S. government personnel serving in Havana, Cuba with persistent memory and thinking dysfunction, as well as vision and balance problems after hearing unusual noises in their homes or hotel rooms. The team published their findings today in JAMA.

Released:
15-Feb-2018 8:05 AM EST
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All Journal News, Government/Law, Neuro, Surgery, U.S. Foreign Relations, JAMA, Local - Pennsylvania

  • Embargo expired:
    12-Feb-2018 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689158

Family History Increases Breast Cancer Risk Even in Older Women: Weighing Screening Options

Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center

Family history of breast cancer continues to significantly increase chances of developing invasive breast tumors in aging women — those ages 65 and older, according to research published in JAMA Internal Medicine. The findings could impact mammography screening decisions later in life.

Released:
8-Feb-2018 12:45 PM EST
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Aging, All Journal News, Cancer, Women's Health, JAMA, Local - DC, Local - DC Metro

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  • Embargo expired:
    12-Feb-2018 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689212

Which Commonly Prescribed Drug is More Effective for Infants with Epilepsy?

Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Comparison of two of the most commonly prescribed drugs for infants with nonsyndromic epilepsy revealed that levetiracetam was more effective than phenobarbital, according a multicenter, observational study published in JAMA Pediatrics. After six months of single-drug treatment, 40 percent of infants who received levetiracetam met criteria for successful outcome – they did not require a second anti-epileptic drug to control their seizures and they became seizure-free within three months of starting treatment. Only 16 percent of infants treated with phenobarbital achieved the same outcome.

Released:
8-Feb-2018 10:05 AM EST
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All Journal News, Children's Health, Epilepsy, Pharmaceuticals, JAMA, Local - Illinois

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Article ID: 689062

Children Affected by Prenatal Drinking More Numerous than Previously Estimated

University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found a significant number of children across four regions in the United States were determined to have fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). The new findings may represent more accurate prevalence estimates of FASD among the general population than prior research.

Released:
6-Feb-2018 12:05 PM EST
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Addiction, Alcohol and Alcoholism, All Journal News, OBGYN, JAMA, Local - California

Article ID: 688873

Uncovering the Long-Term Health Impact of Playing in the NFL

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

In 1987, National Football League players went on strike. As a response, NFL teams scrambled to fill their rosters with “replacement players,” individuals who had some experience with college or professional football, but who weren’t part of NFL rosters that year. The replacement players themselves became a footnote in sports history. It turns out these players may actually play a critical role in football today - by helping us understand how playing in the NFL affects long-term health. In our recent study, published in JAMA, we compared the life expectancies of professional NFL players who debuted between 1982 and 1992 to the life expectancies of replacement players from the 1987 strike.

Released:
2-Feb-2018 9:10 AM EST
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Article ID: 688849

Study: Chaplains Crucial for Advance Care Planning in Medical Practice

Rush University Medical Center

In a study, 80 percent of participants completed an advance directive after meeting with a chaplain as part of a doctor’s appointment

Released:
1-Feb-2018 4:00 PM EST
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Emergency Medicine, Healthcare, Religion, All Journal News, JAMA, Local - Illinois

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  • Embargo expired:
    1-Feb-2018 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 688469

Patients and Doctors Often Disagree in Evaluation of Surgical Scarring

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

When it comes to the physical scars surgery leaves behind, a new study shows patients and doctors often don’t assess their severity the same way. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found patients and physicians disagreed in their scar evaluations 28 percent of the time, with patients more likely to focus on the depth of the scar while physicians were more likely to emphasize coloration and texture.

Released:
25-Jan-2018 8:05 AM EST
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All Journal News, Dermatology, Surgery, JAMA, Local - Pennsylvania, Healthcare


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