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  • Using state-of-the-art flow measurements, engineering professor Timothy Wei and students at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y., are employing science and technology to help the U.S. skeleton team trim track times and gain an edge over other sliders in the upcoming Winter Olympics. The researchers built a replica section of a skeleton track, outfit the track with several sensors and other technology, and brought in 10 skeleton athletes for a test run on the new system. Pictured is one of the athletes using the test system, which yields more information than ever before about the science behind skeleton sliding.
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
    Using state-of-the-art flow measurements, engineering professor Timothy Wei and students at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y., are employing science and technology to help the U.S. skeleton team trim track times and gain an edge over other sliders in the upcoming Winter Olympics. The researchers built a replica section of a skeleton track, outfit the track with several sensors and other technology, and brought in 10 skeleton athletes for a test run on the new system. Pictured is one of the athletes using the test system, which yields more information than ever before about the science behind skeleton sliding.
  • Using state-of-the-art flow measurements, engineering professor Timothy Wei and students at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y., are employing science and technology to help the U.S. skeleton team trim track times and gain an edge over other sliders in the upcoming Winter Olympics. The researchers built a replica section of a skeleton track, outfit the track with several sensors and other technology, and brought in 10 skeleton athletes for a test run on the new system. Pictured is one of the athletes using the test system, which yields more information than ever before about the science behind skeleton sliding.
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
    Using state-of-the-art flow measurements, engineering professor Timothy Wei and students at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y., are employing science and technology to help the U.S. skeleton team trim track times and gain an edge over other sliders in the upcoming Winter Olympics. The researchers built a replica section of a skeleton track, outfit the track with several sensors and other technology, and brought in 10 skeleton athletes for a test run on the new system. Pictured is one of the athletes using the test system, which yields more information than ever before about the science behind skeleton sliding.
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