Previous Article Next Article
  • A clymene dolphin leaps into the air. A newly published study on the clymene dolphin, a small and sleek marine mammal 	living in the Atlantic Ocean, shows that the species arose through natural hybridization between two closely related dolphins species, the spinner dolphin and the striped dolphin.
    Photo credit: R. Pitman
    A clymene dolphin leaps into the air. A newly published study on the clymene dolphin, a small and sleek marine mammal living in the Atlantic Ocean, shows that the species arose through natural hybridization between two closely related dolphins species, the spinner dolphin and the striped dolphin.
  • Group of three clymene dolphins. Scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the American Museum of Natural History, the University of Lisbon, and other groups conclude that the clymene dolphin is the product of natural hybridization, a 	process that is more common for plants, fishes, and birds, but quite rare in mammals.
    Photo credit: NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center.
    Group of three clymene dolphins. Scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the American Museum of Natural History, the University of Lisbon, and other groups conclude that the clymene dolphin is the product of natural hybridization, a process that is more common for plants, fishes, and birds, but quite rare in mammals.
  • The clymene dolphin grows up to nearly seven feet in length and inhabits the tropical and temperate waters of the 	Atlantic Ocean.
    Photo credit: NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center.
    The clymene dolphin grows up to nearly seven feet in length and inhabits the tropical and temperate waters of the Atlantic Ocean.




Chat now!