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  • Georgia Tech researchers have developed a polymer material that can reliably conduct heat from electronic devices. Shown (l-r) are Thomas Bougher, a Ph.D. student in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Virendra Singh, a research scientist in the Woodruff School, and Baratunde Cola, an assistant professor.
    Georgia Tech Photo: Candler Hobbs
    Georgia Tech researchers have developed a polymer material that can reliably conduct heat from electronic devices. Shown (l-r) are Thomas Bougher, a Ph.D. student in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Virendra Singh, a research scientist in the Woodruff School, and Baratunde Cola, an assistant professor.
  • Research scientist Virendra Singh, from the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech, holds a test sample used to measure thermal conductance and thermal cycle reliability in a new polymer material developed to remove heat from electronic devices.
    Georgia Tech Photo: Candler Hobbs
    Research scientist Virendra Singh, from the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech, holds a test sample used to measure thermal conductance and thermal cycle reliability in a new polymer material developed to remove heat from electronic devices.
  • Assistant professor Baratunde Cola, from the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech, and Ph.D. student Tom Bougher, show photoacoustic test equipment used to measure heat conductance of a new polymer material developed for thermal management.
    Georgia Tech Photo: Candler Hobbs
    Assistant professor Baratunde Cola, from the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech, and Ph.D. student Tom Bougher, show photoacoustic test equipment used to measure heat conductance of a new polymer material developed for thermal management.
  • This scanning electron microscope image shows vertical polythiophene nanofiber arrays grown on a metal substrate. The arrays contained either solid fibers or hollow tubes, depending on the diameter of the pores used to grow them.
    Credit: Virendra Singh
    This scanning electron microscope image shows vertical polythiophene nanofiber arrays grown on a metal substrate. The arrays contained either solid fibers or hollow tubes, depending on the diameter of the pores used to grow them.
  • This image shows testing of a polythiophene nanofiber array grown on a copper heat sink and dried in contact with a silicon carbide RF device simulator.
    Credit: Daniel P. Resler
    This image shows testing of a polythiophene nanofiber array grown on a copper heat sink and dried in contact with a silicon carbide RF device simulator.
  • This transmission electron microscope image shows four nanofibers with hollow structure. The thickness of the walls of the tubes ranged from 40 to 80 nanometers, depending on the amount of current applied and the growth time.
    Credit: Ye Cai
    This transmission electron microscope image shows four nanofibers with hollow structure. The thickness of the walls of the tubes ranged from 40 to 80 nanometers, depending on the amount of current applied and the growth time.
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