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  • Building quantum memories on a chip: Diamond photonic crystal cavities (ladder-like structures) are integrated on a silicon substrate. Green laser light (green arrow) excites electrons on impurity atoms trapped within the cavities, picking up information about their spin states, which can then be read out as red light (red arrow) emitted by photoluminescence from the cavity. The inset shows the nitrogen-vacancy (NV)-nanocavity system, where a nitrogen atom (N) is substituted into the diamond crystal lattice in place of a carbon atom (gray balls) adjacent to a vacancy (V). Layers of diamond and air keep light trapped within these cavities long enough to interact with the nitrogen atom's spin state and transfer that information via the emitted light.
    MIT
    Building quantum memories on a chip: Diamond photonic crystal cavities (ladder-like structures) are integrated on a silicon substrate. Green laser light (green arrow) excites electrons on impurity atoms trapped within the cavities, picking up information about their spin states, which can then be read out as red light (red arrow) emitted by photoluminescence from the cavity. The inset shows the nitrogen-vacancy (NV)-nanocavity system, where a nitrogen atom (N) is substituted into the diamond crystal lattice in place of a carbon atom (gray balls) adjacent to a vacancy (V). Layers of diamond and air keep light trapped within these cavities long enough to interact with the nitrogen atom's spin state and transfer that information via the emitted light.
  • A scanning electron micrograph of one of the one-dimensional diamond crystal cavities.
    MIT
    A scanning electron micrograph of one of the one-dimensional diamond crystal cavities.
  • Similar to these funhouse mirrors, diamond crystal nanocavities reflect and trap light around an impurity atom in the diamond crystal lattice so that the light can more readily pick up and transmit information about the atom's spin state. This spin-photon interaction is essential for quantum computing applications.
    Similar to these funhouse mirrors, diamond crystal nanocavities reflect and trap light around an impurity atom in the diamond crystal lattice so that the light can more readily pick up and transmit information about the atom's spin state. This spin-photon interaction is essential for quantum computing applications.
  • Members of the MIT team (l to r): Luozhou Li, Dirk Englund, Michael Walsh, Edward Chen, and Tim Schroder.
    MIT
    Members of the MIT team (l to r): Luozhou Li, Dirk Englund, Michael Walsh, Edward Chen, and Tim Schroder.
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