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  • Visualization of laser-induced motions of atoms (black and yellow spheres) in a molybdenum disulfide monolayer: The laser pulse creates wrinkles with large amplitudes – more than 15 percent of the layer’s thickness – that develop in a trillionth of a second.
    K.-A. Duerloo/Stanford
    Visualization of laser-induced motions of atoms (black and yellow spheres) in a molybdenum disulfide monolayer: The laser pulse creates wrinkles with large amplitudes – more than 15 percent of the layer’s thickness – that develop in a trillionth of a second.
  • Illustrations (each showing a top and two side views) of a single layer of molybdenum disulfide (atoms shown as spheres). Top left: In a hypothetical world without motions, the “ideal” monolayer would be flat. Top right: In reality, the monolayer is wrinkled as shown in this room-temperature simulation. Bottom: If a laser pulse heats the monolayer up, it sends ripples through the layer. These wrinkles, which researchers have now observed for the first time, have large amplitudes and develop on ultrafast timescales.
    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
    Illustrations (each showing a top and two side views) of a single layer of molybdenum disulfide (atoms shown as spheres). Top left: In a hypothetical world without motions, the “ideal” monolayer would be flat. Top right: In reality, the monolayer is wrinkled as shown in this room-temperature simulation. Bottom: If a laser pulse heats the monolayer up, it sends ripples through the layer. These wrinkles, which researchers have now observed for the first time, have large amplitudes and develop on ultrafast timescales.
  • Researchers have used SLAC’s experiment for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED), one of the world’s fastest “electron cameras,” to take snapshots of a three-atom-thick layer of a promising material as it wrinkles in response to a laser pulse. Understanding these dynamic ripples could provide crucial clues for the development of next-generation solar cells, electronics and catalysts.
    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
    Researchers have used SLAC’s experiment for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED), one of the world’s fastest “electron cameras,” to take snapshots of a three-atom-thick layer of a promising material as it wrinkles in response to a laser pulse. Understanding these dynamic ripples could provide crucial clues for the development of next-generation solar cells, electronics and catalysts.
  • To study ultrafast atomic motions in a single layer of molybdenum disulfide, researchers followed a pump-probe approach: They excited motions with a laser pulse (pump pulse, red) and probed the laser-induced structural changes with a subsequent electron pulse (probe pulse, blue). The electrons of the probe pulse scatter off the monolayer’s atoms (blue and yellow spheres) and form a scattering pattern on the detector – a signal the team used to determine the monolayer structure. By recording patterns at different time delays between the pump and probe pulses, the scientists were able to determine how the atomic structure of the molybdenum disulfide film changed over time.
    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
    To study ultrafast atomic motions in a single layer of molybdenum disulfide, researchers followed a pump-probe approach: They excited motions with a laser pulse (pump pulse, red) and probed the laser-induced structural changes with a subsequent electron pulse (probe pulse, blue). The electrons of the probe pulse scatter off the monolayer’s atoms (blue and yellow spheres) and form a scattering pattern on the detector – a signal the team used to determine the monolayer structure. By recording patterns at different time delays between the pump and probe pulses, the scientists were able to determine how the atomic structure of the molybdenum disulfide film changed over time.
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