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  • A researcher holds a tray of Zika virus growing in animal cells at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. There is no treatment available to block Zika virus in a pregnant woman from infecting her fetus and potentially causing severe birth defects. But researchers have identified a human antibody that prevents, in pregnant mice, the fetus from becoming infected and the placenta from being damaged. The antibody also protects adult mice from Zika disease.
    Huy Mach
    A researcher holds a tray of Zika virus growing in animal cells at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. There is no treatment available to block Zika virus in a pregnant woman from infecting her fetus and potentially causing severe birth defects. But researchers have identified a human antibody that prevents, in pregnant mice, the fetus from becoming infected and the placenta from being damaged. The antibody also protects adult mice from Zika disease.
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