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  • This close-up image shows a Western Shovel-nosed snake, a species native to the deserts of the Southwest United States.
    Allison Carter, Georgia Tech
    This close-up image shows a Western Shovel-nosed snake, a species native to the deserts of the Southwest United States.
  • A Georgia Tech researcher holds a Western Shovel-nosed snake (Chionactis occipitalis). The desert snakes were used in a study of how the animals interact with obstacles while moving through their environment.
    Photo: Allison Carter, Georgia Tech
    A Georgia Tech researcher holds a Western Shovel-nosed snake (Chionactis occipitalis). The desert snakes were used in a study of how the animals interact with obstacles while moving through their environment.
  • Perrin Schiebel, a recent Georgia Tech Ph.D. graduate, shows how snakes were placed into an arena to observe how they responded to obstacles. The snakes use an S-shaped wave to move through the sand and did not alter it when encountering a set of rubber pegs.
    Photo: Allison Carter, Georgia Tech
    Perrin Schiebel, a recent Georgia Tech Ph.D. graduate, shows how snakes were placed into an arena to observe how they responded to obstacles. The snakes use an S-shaped wave to move through the sand and did not alter it when encountering a set of rubber pegs.
  • A Western Shovel-nosed snake moves through a force-sensitive set of rubber pegs. The pegs altered the direction of the snakes’ travel, but didn’t vary the waveform they used to move.
    Photo: Allison Carter, Georgia Tech
    A Western Shovel-nosed snake moves through a force-sensitive set of rubber pegs. The pegs altered the direction of the snakes’ travel, but didn’t vary the waveform they used to move.
  • Georgia Tech undergraduate student Lillian Chen demonstrates how she and colleague Alex Hubbard studied snakes as they moved through an arena covered with shag carpet to mimic sand.
    Photo: Allison Carter, Georgia Tech
    Georgia Tech undergraduate student Lillian Chen demonstrates how she and colleague Alex Hubbard studied snakes as they moved through an arena covered with shag carpet to mimic sand.
  • Researchers (l-r) Perrin Schiebel, Lillian Chen, Jennifer Rieser and Dan Goldman are shown with a snake moving through an experimental arena.
    Photo: Allison Carter, Georgia Tech
    Researchers (l-r) Perrin Schiebel, Lillian Chen, Jennifer Rieser and Dan Goldman are shown with a snake moving through an experimental arena.
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